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Author Topic: Best display solution NEC 2690 v. P221W Lots of questions  (Read 6189 times)
ChuckH
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« on: July 03, 2009, 11:02:00 AM »
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I am looking for the best quality v. price solution for the following photo education scenario:

I am building a photography concentration in a small to mediums size university art department.  I currently teach a digital course in an iMac lab w/ an Epson 4880, I just ordered a xRite i1xtreme to calibrate the lab.
I am setting up a single "advanced" workstation in a different room w/ Epson 9900 driven by a MacPro and print viewing area w/ Solux 3500K track lights for print judging.  This station will be to print potentially larger and more color critical exhibition quality prints (and more tightly regulated advanced student usage).  I am looking for the best monitor to be on this station for a reasonable cost.  I could could possibly stretch the budget to $1100 USD (NEC2690), but would like to spend less if possible.  I think I can do better than the 24" apple LED.  I would look at size range from 22" - 26".  I've been recommended the NEC 2690 (Epson Print Academy)... but have a few questions for which I could not figure out from reading a reasonable amount of forum archives.

1. Am I correct to assume that how much of the Adobe RGB space a display can cover is one of my top considerations to a better display for my purposes (soft proofing)?

2. Is my understanding correct that I would be best served to use the NEC SpectraViewII software (and not the i1Match Software I'll be using on the imacs)?  I see on NEC website that the SV version of the NEC LCD2690WUXi2 allow me to calibrate w/ xrite i1Pro Device, but is it to the full potential?  In other words, would my i1Pro calibration device be in any way sub par to puck included in the SV bundle 2690? It seems I read on the forum that SpectraView II software is necessary to take full advantage of the display's capabilities. Is this true?

3. Does my i1Pro measurement device give the same hardware calibration (as the NEC SV bundle puck) or would it only be a graphics card calibration?  (my lack of understanding here may be answered from question #2)

4. If the SV version of the 2690 is necessary to take full advantage, that might be a bit over budget for me (nearly double my budget for the 24" apple display).  Any other better-than-24" Apple LCD- recommendations?   I was thinking NEC P221W SV (if SV is optimal) over Apple 24".  

5.  What advantages does the 2690 offer compared to the NEC MultiSync P221W? or better, why is the P221W so inexpensive?  For my use (as described at top of post) would the P221W not suffice?  

Even w/ educational pricing available on the EIzo, the only comparable Eizo for the price is CG222W and it seems the NEC 2690 gives more bang for the buck (26" v 22").

Thanks for any input!!  Chuck
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Czornyj
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2009, 12:37:40 PM »
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1. the color space of your display should cover as much of 9900 color space, as possible. You may expect, that the more aRGB it covers - the better, but it's not that simple
2. SVII is an excellent profiler, and it allows to utilize the whole potencial of NEC x90/P221W. I use i1pro to calibrate NEC panels and it works like a charm
3. i1pro is supported by SVII so yes it'll calibrate the NECs
4. You may also consider NEC 2490WUXi, but it's not a wide gamut panel (neither is the Apple 24")
5. 2690WUXi is larger, has higher resolution, higher bit (12) LUT, electronic uniformity compensation and H-IPS A-TW panel with slightly wider gamut. P221W has only 10 bit LUT, no uniformity compensation and S-PVA panel - in practice it doesn't calibrate as good as x90 NEC series panels.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2009, 12:39:20 PM by Czornyj » Logged

ChuckH
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2009, 03:54:52 PM »
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Thanks for your input...

Quote from: Czornyj
2. SVII is an excellent profiler, and it allows to utilize the whole potencial of NEC x90/P221W. I use i1pro to calibrate NEC panels and it works like a charm
3. i1pro is supported by SVII so yes it'll calibrate the NECs

So, absolutely no difference is using the i1Pro or the NEC puck so long as I use SVII software?

Quote
5. 2690WUXi is larger, has higher resolution, higher bit (12) LUT, electronic uniformity compensation and H-IPS A-TW panel with slightly wider gamut. P221W has only 10 bit LUT, no uniformity compensation and S-PVA panel - in practice it doesn't calibrate as good as x90 NEC series panels.

WOuld you say the P221W is a step above the quality and capability of the Apple 24"?  

Is there a huge visible difference in 10 bit LUT v. 12 bit?  What is the visible difference in S-PVA panel v. H-IPS A TW?  

THanks again for your help!  I'm trying to stretch dollars but I do realize you typically get what you pay for.  I just trying to prioritize this need with many other equipment needs.

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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2009, 05:01:47 PM »
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Quote from: ChuckH
5.  What advantages does the 2690 offer compared to the NEC MultiSync P221W? or better, why is the P221W so inexpensive?  For my use (as described at top of post) would the P221W not suffice?

The 2690 is a higher quality panel and has ColorComp, AutoLuminance which the P221 doesn't. The P221 is quite a nice unit for the money but think of it as a poor man's SpectraView II. Great for a classroom, but if you have the funds, go for the 2690.

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WOuld you say the P221W is a step above the quality and capability of the Apple 24"?

By leaps and bounds.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2009, 05:03:04 PM by digitaldog » Logged

Andrew Rodney
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Phil Indeblanc
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2009, 05:49:33 PM »
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Why do you use Solux 3500K temp for image viewing?

As far as the Apple monitors...they are average screens at best. Either you mention will be far better than the Apple.

I thought I had a nice 30" Apple cinema display.... until I had other displays next to it.  (so disappointing). The Dell screens are better.
Do yourself a favor and don't look at the Samsung XL LED series, you will not want to take your eyes off of it.
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ChuckH
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2009, 07:10:50 PM »
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Quote from: Phil Indeblanc
Why do you use Solux 3500K temp for image viewing?

I believe the 3500K SoLux is preferred (reading up on reviews on Solux website that backs this thought), and in my head its closer to real world gallery / museum lighting scenario than 4700K or 5000K.   Especially as most of the exhibition spaces I've worked with (not MAJOR nationally recognized institutions) probably use a range of lights from warmer incandescent floods to 'daylight' bulbs in their fixtures - and I don't always know which venue or type of bulb I'm printing for when the work is produced.  So, I'm fine with it.  The space I have for print judging has blinds but an unavoidable wall of north facing windows.  I'll admit its not perfect (controlled) and will give different results day v. night, but many galleries also have lots of natural light in the day mixed with track lighting.


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ChuckH
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2009, 07:20:21 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
The 2690 is a higher quality panel and has ColorComp, AutoLuminance which the P221 doesn't. The P221 is quite a nice unit for the money but think of it as a poor man's SpectraView II. Great for a classroom, but if you have the funds, go for the 2690.

Thanks Andrew.  So, I think the SVII software alone is $99.00, and I might just have to splurge on the 2690 and software, but use the i1Pro device to calibrate.

Didn't I see you mention in a previous topic that the i1Pro device can't read all the colors of the WG display, but should only be off on the color temp by 500K? (and that was negligible?)

NEC's website does mention special education pricing, but of course these prices are not available online.  It might not include such "professional" equipment as the *90 series.  I'll call them up after the holiday and see about this.


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digitaldog
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2009, 07:53:46 PM »
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Quote from: ChuckH
Didn't I see you mention in a previous topic that the i1Pro device can't read all the colors of the WG display, but should only be off on the color temp by 500K? (and that was negligible?)

No, just the opposite. The i1Pro is a Spectrophotometer, no issues with wide gamut units. The EyeOne Display-2, a colorimeter might, as its filter set isn't optimized for this kind of wide gamut device. NEC however has a special mated EyeOne Colorimeter which is ideal for this task.
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Andrew Rodney
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walter.sk
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« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2009, 09:02:34 AM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
The 2690 is a higher quality panel and has ColorComp, AutoLuminance which the P221 doesn't.
Andrew:

I calibrate/profile my NEC 3090 with SpectraView II, and I have the Color Comp checked but have left the Auto Luminance off.  Do you suggest leaving both of these on when calibrating/profiling?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2009, 09:08:40 AM »
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I leave Auto Luminance on.
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Andrew Rodney
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