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Author Topic: Shifting Back vs Panoheads for stiching  (Read 2104 times)
Whatsnewsisyphus
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« on: July 06, 2009, 04:12:57 PM »
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So Is there a difference between using the two techniques while stiching to obtain a greater resolution image using a longer lens, combining four images for a greater angle of view?
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2009, 05:16:03 PM »
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A quick search on the forum will reveal recent discussion on this topic.

There are differences but good results can be obtained with both techniques. I personnally use both when I have my 24 PCE around.

Overall spherical stitching is a more general technique that has the potential to reach much higher resolutions and that is typically faster to operate in the field. On the other hand, some photographers prefer to be able to use the ground glass of a LF camera do adjust their composition. If you are one of these, then flat stitching might be a better option for you.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Whatsnewsisyphus
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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2009, 12:48:38 AM »
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So do they produce the same photographic result or does spherical stitching need more adjustments before the pieces fit each other? These are architectural shots that we used to shoot 8x10 and drum scanned, to be printed 7' on the long side
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2009, 03:15:57 AM »
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Quote from: Whatsnewsisyphus
So do they produce the same photographic result or does spherical stitching need more adjustments before the pieces fit each other? These are architectural shots that we used to shoot 8x10 and drum scanned, to be printed 7' on the long side

They typically produce very similar results if you use the leading softwares like Autopano Pro/Giga or PTgui in plannar projection mode.

There are of course physical limitations to the angular coverage that can be projected on a plane, so you will need to figure that out, but that is obviously going to be the same with flat stitching.

Regards,
Bernard
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Tyler Mallory
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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2009, 09:47:44 PM »
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You mentioned you are shooting architectural subjects. In that case, you will want to lean towards shifting and stitching, rather than the pan technique. Panning will cause straight lines to bow across the stitched frames, as the lens and sensor change their relationship to those lines in each frame. Shifting will keep the lines continuous through the frames, requiring much less post-prod juggling.

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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2009, 10:03:58 PM »
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Quote from: Tyler Mallory
You mentioned you are shooting architectural subjects. In that case, you will want to lean towards shifting and stitching, rather than the pan technique. Panning will cause straight lines to bow across the stitched frames, as the lens and sensor change their relationship to those lines in each frame. Shifting will keep the lines continuous through the frames, requiring much less post-prod juggling.

That is not the case if a pano head is properlly used and planar projection applied in the stitching application.

The following image is a good example, the image is 180 megapixels and was shot with a Zeiss 100mm lens on a Nikon D3x, pano head from Really right Stuff and stitching done in PTgui (if I recall correctly). Note that the bridges are perfectly straight (they are the only straight item in this building).



Regards,
Bernard
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elf
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2009, 11:44:13 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
That is not the case if a pano head is properlly used and planar projection applied in the stitching application.

Bernard is correct. 3 or 4 years ago most stitchers couldn't handle different projections and most would have had a difficult time with this image.  I believe PTAssembler has the most different types of projections: http://www.tawbaware.com/forum2/viewtopic....e2360bfc09c059a
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