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Author Topic: Beaulieu-Sur-Dordogne  (Read 2740 times)
alangubbay
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« on: July 09, 2009, 03:40:41 PM »
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[attachment=15245:Beaulieu...Dordogne.jpg]
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 03:46:38 PM »
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Has a nice Renaissance feel to it...

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
dalethorn
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2009, 03:57:37 PM »
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Looks great.  I assume you applied a texture in post processing.  It works pretty well here.
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RSL
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2009, 04:21:05 PM »
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Quote from: wolfnowl
Has a nice Renaissance feel to it...

Mike.

Mike, Renaissance? With that much texture it looks more like pointillism, which didn't come along until a bit later.

It's fine composition. I wonder what it looks like as an actual photograph.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 04:22:33 PM by RSL » Logged

alangubbay
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2009, 02:19:10 AM »
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Quote from: alangubbay
[attachment=15245:Beaulieu...Dordogne.jpg]

Thank you for your comments.  Here is the original photgraph after scanning the film and processing in Photoshop.  Later, detail was removed with "Buzz Professional" and the texture applied.  I feel that it is reminiscent of George Saurat's "Les Baigneuses".  Alan
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RSL
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 09:58:00 AM »
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Quote from: alangubbay
Thank you for your comments.  Here is the original photgraph after scanning the film and processing in Photoshop.  Later, detail was removed with "Buzz Professional" and the texture applied.  I feel that it is reminiscent of George Saurat's "Les Baigneuses".  Alan

Alan, The textured version certainly looks like Seurat. I love the composition. That's the kind of thing you learn from looking at great works -- paintings or photographs. Since I'm a photographer I'm really more taken with the photograph, though the photo looks a bit over-sharpened to me, but on a computer monitor it's hard to be sure.

Congratulations. It's a fine piece of work.
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2009, 11:48:59 AM »
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I like the composition, it's well-balanced with plenty of interest for your eye to wonder over. The trees frame the image nicely (especially on the left), and the curving bank adds some nice lines flowing through the frame. Even the areas of shadow and highlight are positioned to serve the composition well. It can be hard to judge what is truly level around rivers and lakes, due irregular shore lines; but looking at the buildings the image appears to be slightly off level.

I think the post-processing works very well for this image. The only thing that bugs me a bit, is that the two people in the foreground seem to have less of that painted/textured look and appear more 'photographic' than the rest of the image.
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2009, 12:10:37 PM »
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Quote from: alangubbay
Later, detail was removed with "Buzz Professional" and the texture applied.    

Alan




Very interesting treatment; never heard of "Buzz Professional" and canīt raise it on Google - assuming it isnīt an insider joke which I canīt see, where can I learn about it?

A convincing effect, of that there is neither doubt nor insider joke!

Rob C
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Ronny Nilsen
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2009, 12:16:01 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Very interesting treatment; never heard of "Buzz Professional" and canīt raise it on Google - assuming it isnīt an insider joke which I canīt see, where can I learn about it?

A convincing effect, of that there is neither doubt nor insider joke!

Rob C

Buzz Professional

Ronny
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cmi
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2009, 12:16:50 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Very interesting treatment; never heard of "Buzz Professional" and canīt raise it on Google - assuming it isnīt an insider joke which I canīt see, where can I learn about it?

A convincing effect, of that there is neither doubt nor insider joke!

Rob C

Seems your google skills need an update   No seriously, I searched for "Buzz Professional" and the first links gives this page. A photoshop plugin.
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2009, 01:10:28 PM »
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Alas, from the page you linked:

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As of November 2007, Fo2Pix is out of business and the company assets are in liquidation. Unfortunately, there is no way to purchase buZZ or other Fo2Pix products at this time
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Rob C
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 03:26:08 AM »
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Buzz Pro

Very odd goings on: I tried the first link from Ronny and got the site with a pop-up that took some killing; the next try, at Christianīs link, produced the same site but without the pop-up but with the additional info that the Buzz people had gone out of business some years ago!

No idea why my own Google search failed - checked the spelling, too.

Either way, seems Iīve missed the ferry. Thanks for your help, regardless.

Rob C
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alangubbay
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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2009, 03:46:58 AM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
Alas, from the page you linked:

I am so sorry to hear that bad news.  It is just too good to lose and I have no doubt it will re-appear in another guise soon.  It was an inexpensive program, once described as the best-kept secret in digital photography, despite the silly name.  It enabled one to remove detail with simplifyers, yet retain focus.  The rationale went something like this: A painter starts with a blank canvas, adds outlines, then broad brush strokes, then fills in some detail. The photographer reverses the process starting with a mass of fine detail which is then removed and broad washes of colour added, fading toward the edges, together with emphasised outlines to get the painterly effect.  However, one did need a lot of time and effort as you would expect.  Some years ago the company stopped advertising it (although remaining still available) and incorporated it into a large expensive stand-alone program - Artmaster.  I tried the demo. version but could not really get on with it.

As this has generated some interest I will put up another picture - Roussillon, where I again used the program for some of the processing.
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alangubbay
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« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2009, 04:20:15 AM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
I like the composition, it's well-balanced with plenty of interest for your eye to wonder over. The trees frame the image nicely (especially on the left), and the curving bank adds some nice lines flowing through the frame. Even the areas of shadow and highlight are positioned to serve the composition well. It can be hard to judge what is truly level around rivers and lakes, due irregular shore lines; but looking at the buildings the image appears to be slightly off level.

I think the post-processing works very well for this image. The only thing that bugs me a bit, is that the two people in the foreground seem to have less of that painted/textured look and appear more 'photographic' than the rest of the image.

Yes, you are absolutely right.  As they are closer and were my wife and son I thought I might let them be sharper !

There is an interesting history to this picture.  It was taken on negative film some 17 years ago.  When we returned from holiday this was the only frame which I thought might be of some use.  I put it on one side planning to return to make a larger print sometime later.  However it then disappeared and no amount of searching would locate it.  Eventually the "bereavment" gradually wore off.  About a year later the film "Schindler's List" came out and I thought that I would refer back to Tom Keneally's book "Shindler's Arc".  When I took it down from the shelf, it fell open revealing the precious negative - perfectly preserved in the dark but perhaps not acid-free environment.  A truly joyful moment!
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