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Author Topic: calibration gurus...  (Read 5197 times)
mbalensiefer
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« on: July 21, 2009, 07:59:25 AM »
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Hello!

 I am trying to make my monitor-profiled pictures look good on my iPod Touch. Pixel and performance-wise this shan't be a good idea...but I'd still like to display the best picture possible therein.

 My Touch is much darker than a calibrated monitor, and colors are more vivid (oversaturated to be sure).

 Instead of calibrating the TOUCH to be able to display my images accurately...
 Is there a way one can profile these devices and then apply such profiles --in a batch process-- to the images before they are uploaded to the Touch?

 My calibration kit's "eye" views 30-odd numbers of colors. I could obtain these and then profile the eye on my Touch...however, the software has a "speed" in reading the colors that I won't be able to match.

 I hope I am not confusing anyone, thanks in advance.

~Michael
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 09:27:27 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
Hello!

 I am trying to make my monitor-profiled pictures look good on my iPod Touch. Pixel and performance-wise this shan't be a good idea...but I'd still like to display the best picture possible therein.

 My Touch is much darker than a calibrated monitor, and colors are more vivid (oversaturated to be sure).

 Instead of calibrating the TOUCH to be able to display my images accurately...
 Is there a way one can profile these devices and then apply such profiles --in a batch process-- to the images before they are uploaded to the Touch?

 My calibration kit's "eye" views 30-odd numbers of colors. I could obtain these and then profile the eye on my Touch...however, the software has a "speed" in reading the colors that I won't be able to match.

 I hope I am not confusing anyone, thanks in advance.

~Michael

Easy version: Because the iTouch is probably not all that stable in its color output to begin with, perhaps the easiest solution would be to create and save a set of adjustment layers (probably just Curves and Hue/Sat would do it) tuned for the iTouch, and then add them to each file heading to the iTouch...
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pherold
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 12:23:24 PM »
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Steve Upton wrote an article about a year ago on the color of the iPhone.  In it he includes a link to download a profile he made of his iPhone.  You could try converting your images to that.  It is a "canned" profile instead of one that's customized for your iTouch, but it's an easy way to start.

http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/Color_on_iPhone
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Czornyj
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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 12:26:52 PM »
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My son has an iPod Touch, so if you'll tell me what luminance level you prefer, I believe I can make a profile of this toy for you.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 01:06:37 PM by Czornyj » Logged

mbalensiefer
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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2009, 06:53:24 PM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
My son has an iPod Touch, so if you'll tell me what luminance level you prefer, I believe I can make a profile of this toy for you.

 This board is great.
 I will try the above tip(s); but in the meantime, I think pictures look best at an 81% brightness adjustment (Version 1, iTouch).)

Thanks a ton.

Michael
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Czornyj
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2009, 07:07:09 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
This board is great.
 I will try the above tip(s); but in the meantime, I think pictures look best at an 81% brightness adjustment (Version 1, iTouch).)

Thanks a ton.

Michael

Here's the profile (created with i1match and i1pro spectro):

http://members.chello.pl/m.kaluza/iPodTouch80%.ICC

I'm not sure what version it really is, so I only hope it will work for you
« Last Edit: July 24, 2009, 07:22:30 AM by Czornyj » Logged

mbalensiefer
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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2009, 08:49:25 AM »
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Hi! I just tried to download it...I think that http links can't carry " % "'s?
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Czornyj
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« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2009, 09:44:09 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
Hi! I just tried to download it...I think that http links can't carry " % "'s?

Sorry

http://members.chello.pl/m.kaluza/iPodTouch80.icc

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mbalensiefer
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« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2009, 09:50:29 AM »
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Thanks.

 I tried your profile and I also read and tried to apply the profile listed at:

 http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/Color_on_iPhone

 Ok.
 So at an approximately 80% brightness level on the iPhone/Touch, I am trying to make Apple's iPod images appear the same as these images when displayed on my calibrated computer.

According to the article above, iPod's iTunes software strips profiles completely before changing the image into iPod's proprietary format for load onto their devices.

 In Photoshop one can ASSIGN profiles and one can CONVERT profiles.
 "Assigned" profiles don't seem to change the appearance of the image as displayed on my desktop(?)...nor then will it change the (oversaturated) appearance I am trying to avoid when installed on my iPod.
 
So should I batch file files from their original RGB state, CONVERT them into the iPod profile, and then load them onto my iPod?

As a note, your profile seems to brighten an image, which is what I want. The "CHROMiX iPhone G1 Aug08" profile seems to be a display of what a normal image will look like once it is loaded ONTO the iPod. What do you think?

~Michael
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 09:52:21 AM by mbalensiefer » Logged
Czornyj
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« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2009, 11:34:38 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
So should I batch file files from their original RGB state, CONVERT them into the iPod profile, and then load them onto my iPod?

As a note, your profile seems to brighten an image, which is what I want. The "CHROMiX iPhone G1 Aug08" profile seems to be a display of what a normal image will look like once it is loaded ONTO the iPod. What do you think?

~Michael

Yes, you should convert images to the iPodTouch profile to get proper look. It won't be same as your computer screen, becouse iPods white point is 8500K, while we usually calibrate our displays at 6500K.

As fot the CHROMiX profile, it seems that iP G1 TRC was gamma 1.57, while my iPod is gamma 2.33 - so that's why images converted to my profile are brighter in the shadow area.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 11:34:56 AM by Czornyj » Logged

Czornyj
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« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2009, 04:14:44 PM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
It won't be same as your computer screen, becouse iPods white point is 8500K, while we usually calibrate our displays at 6500K.

...BTW - if you want to correct the cold look of iPod displayed images, you might try to use this plugin:
http://cliff.rames.googlepages.com/ciecam02plugin

convert the image to my profile, and then activate the plugin:

in section "5" change the white point to D75 or 9300 and click "ok" - iPod is 8500K rather than 7500 or 9300K so the effect will not be perfect, but so or so it will be perceptually closer to what you see on the screen.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 04:16:57 PM by Czornyj » Logged

mbalensiefer
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« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2009, 07:48:24 PM »
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in section "5" change the white point to D75 or 9300 and click "ok" - iPod is 8500K rather than 7500 or 9300K so the effect will not be perfect, but so or so it will be perceptually closer to what you see on the screen.

 Thanks, Czornyj.

 But if I am using your profile, doesn't your profile compensate for the white point?

  ...

 Incidentally, I am using the color-managed ACDSee Pro 2.5 to view my images. I have enabled color management, and my monitor is already running off of a profile. So:
  IF my monitor is already calibrated, then should my image viewer (ACDSee) have "default images to sRGB" checked under the Input color space (no color management)?

  If not; then when I ENABLE color management, should my monitor's profile be selected as the Default Input Profile (so then the profile would be used TWICE??), or should sRGB? sRGB is the color space that I work in.

Also, should I wish to preview, say; what my images will look when transfered onto my iPod, then I would use the Chromix profile and place it under "Emulated Device Profile" in the Output section, correct?

lots to learn

Thanks a ton,
 V/R
~ Michael
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 07:50:46 PM by mbalensiefer » Logged
Czornyj
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« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2009, 03:57:09 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
But if I am using your profile, doesn't your profile compensate for the white point?
No, it's only a relative colorimetrc conversion, so the white point is not compensated.


Quote from: mbalensiefer
Incidentally, I am using the color-managed ACDSee Pro 2.5 to view my images. I have enabled color management, and my monitor is already running off of a profile. So:
  IF my monitor is already calibrated, then should my image viewer (ACDSee) have "default images to sRGB" checked under the Input color space (no color management)?

  If not; then when I ENABLE color management, should my monitor's profile be selected as the Default Input Profile (so then the profile would be used TWICE??), or should sRGB? sRGB is the color space that I work in.

Also, should I wish to preview, say; what my images will look when transfered onto my iPod, then I would use the Chromix profile and place it under "Emulated Device Profile" in the Output section, correct?

lots to learn

Thanks a ton,
 V/R
~ Michael
The "default input profile" is a profile that's used while ACDSee is displaying the untagged pictures. Choose sRGB rather than your monitor profile, otherwise ACDSee will display untagged images in the color space of your display. The "Use embedded profiles when found in image files" option MUST be checked (as it is)!

In Output section you should choose the profile you created for your display in "Monitor Profile" box. And yes, you can choose the iPod profile to check how your images will look on your iPod.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2009, 03:58:23 AM by Czornyj » Logged

mbalensiefer
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« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2009, 07:37:59 AM »
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Thanks!

I am going to do a 'lil experimenting here...and let you know what my results are. Out of curiosity, do you think the Chromix profile was the result of a different luminance (brightness) setting?

V/R
Michael
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Czornyj
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« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2009, 11:10:49 AM »
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Quote from: mbalensiefer
Out of curiosity, do you think the Chromix profile was the result of a different luminance (brightness) setting?

I think the Chromix profile was the result of totally different display in iP G1. The one in my iPod has different TRC (~gamma 2.2) and larger gamut.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2009, 11:11:18 AM by Czornyj » Logged

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