Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: world´s largest spherical panorama  (Read 8014 times)
julian kalmar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« on: August 15, 2009, 03:03:05 AM »
ReplyReply

-1200 raw pics Canon 5D MK II FL 100mm -> 310 for full sphere

-exposure between 15 sec. and 1/2 sec

-focus stacking and 3 wb settings (3000k, 5500k, 9000k)

-NN5

-PTGui

-3 days pc running to calc the sphere

-cube size 32768x32768 (5,3 Gigapixel)

-8 hours photoshooting

-2 month to combine the different focusing layers ,editing the WB and exposure layers
world largest spherical pano
« Last Edit: August 16, 2009, 08:41:37 AM by julian kalmar » Logged
timparkin
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 56


« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2009, 03:36:55 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: julian kalmar
-1200 raw pics Canon 5D MK II FL 100mm -> 310 for full sphere

-exposure between 15 sec. and 1/2 sec

-focus stacking and 3 wb settings (3000k, 5500k, 9000k)

-NN5

-PTGui

-3 days pc running to calc the sphere

-cube size 32768x32768

-8 hours photoshooting

-2 month to combine the different focusing layers ,editing the WB and exposure layers
world largest spherical pano

I was expecting some exceptionally boring technical excercise but this is wonderful - well done, both technically and a wonderful choice of subject
Logged
Derry
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2009, 09:03:50 AM »
ReplyReply

exceptional quality and detail,,

you can spend hours just slowly moving the lens around and enjoying all the small items you would never see in a normal photography,,

Derry
Logged
wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5744



WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2009, 10:18:59 AM »
ReplyReply

Quite the work of art... congratulations!

Love,
Mike.
Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
dmerger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 686


« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 12:01:58 PM »
ReplyReply

Superb!
Logged

Dean Erger
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2009, 12:44:55 PM »
ReplyReply

That is an amazing accomplishment!

Julian was too modest to include his URL in the post, so here it is.  Many other delights are there.

http://photoartkalmar.com/index.html
Logged
Stephane Desnault
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 68


« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2009, 01:06:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Wow! This is amazing. How does one publish cubic panos that are also GigaPixels?
« Last Edit: August 15, 2009, 01:08:42 PM by Stephane Desnault » Logged
bradleygibson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 829


WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2009, 02:52:54 PM »
ReplyReply

Like Tim, I'm often disappointed with the artistic merit of panoramic stitches--they're usually more about being big than great.

You've done something special here--this is beautiful.

It would be nice to have a smoother browsing experience, but that doesn't take away from your accomplishment here--it's both cool and lovely.

Nice job!
Logged

elf
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 232


« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2009, 02:52:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: julian kalmar
-1200 raw pics Canon 5D MK II FL 100mm -> 310 for full sphere

-exposure between 15 sec. and 1/2 sec

-focus stacking and 3 wb settings (3000k, 5500k, 9000k)

-NN5

-PTGui

-3 days pc running to calc the sphere

-cube size 32768x32768 (5,3 Gigapixel)

-8 hours photoshooting

-2 month to combine the different focusing layers ,editing the WB and exposure layers
world largest spherical pano

Excellent shot and well worth the effort.  Thanks for sharing.

p.s. You're 3GP short of the world record though
Logged
julian kalmar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2009, 01:35:50 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: elf
p.s. You're 3GP short of the world record though
I don´t think so
There are many larger zylidrical panos but this is the largest spherical pano
Logged
Guillermo Luijk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1290



WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2009, 05:51:21 AM »
ReplyReply

In two words: im-pressive.

I would be interested to know more about the WB edition, was it manual? what did it consist of?

Regards
« Last Edit: August 22, 2009, 06:00:00 AM by GLuijk » Logged

jdemott
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 434


« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2009, 11:17:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Beautiful work.  Thank you for posting the link.
Logged

John DeMott
Colorwave
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 999


WWW
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2009, 11:51:10 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for sharing this.  Your subject was well chosen for displaying detail as well as geometry.  While there is obvious spherical distortion that is inherent in the process, I see no stitching artifacts and the geometry, exposures and DOF work together to make for a seamless viewing experience.  I have no idea how you pulled this off, but stand in awe of it's technical accomplishment.  How many camera positions were required to not shoot yourself or support structure?
Logged

julian kalmar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2009, 01:49:33 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: GLuijk
I would be interested to know more about the WB edition, was it manual? what did it consist of?
Regards
The problem with the WB: The ceiling is lighted with lamps that have 3000K, the daylight about 5500K and the small lamps you can see everywhere under the ceiling 9000K
I shoot everything in RAW, then I created the pano 3 times with different WB settings and mixed the three panos in PS.
Logged
julian kalmar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2009, 01:55:51 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Colorwave
Thanks for sharing this.  Your subject was well chosen for displaying detail as well as geometry.  While there is obvious spherical distortion that is inherent in the process, I see no stitching artifacts and the geometry, exposures and DOF work together to make for a seamless viewing experience.  I have no idea how you pulled this off, but stand in awe of it's technical accomplishment.  How many camera positions were required to not shoot yourself or support structure?
The Dof problem I solved with focus blending. Some images do have up to 5 different focusing points.
The question about the nadir shooting will remain companies secret.... I worked really a long time to find a solution for this.
The nadir is not manipulated. I simply stitched the nadir images with the other images without any viewpointcorrection or stitching errors
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 07:42:08 AM by julian kalmar » Logged
OldRoy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 428


WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2009, 12:02:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: julian kalmar
The Dof problem I solved with focus blending. Some images do have up to 5 different focusing points.
The question about the nadir shooting will remain companies secret.... I worked really a long time to find a solution for this.
The nadir is not manipulated. I simply stitched the nadir images with the other images without any stitching errors
Julian, I was expecting a brilliant piece of work - and I wasn't disappointed. All of your work that I've seen is superb. As someone who makes VR panos - modestly - I can easily appreciate the amount of work, skill and experience required to complete such a project. And patience of course.

I imagine that your nadir patching uses some type of viewpoint correction (can't see how else it could be done) but at this FL... blimey.

Thanks for showing us what can be done. I think VR panos are very much a poor relation to other forms of panography - probably because the web is the only display medium. Mind you the equirectangular projection of this pano would be stunning as a huge print!

I'd appreciate a couple of bits of info that won't impinge on your trade secrets!
Which head do you use? Which stitching application?
Roy
« Last Edit: August 23, 2009, 12:03:22 PM by OldRoy » Logged
julian kalmar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2009, 01:16:51 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: OldRoy
I imagine that your nadir patching uses some type of viewpoint correction (can't see how else it could be done) but at this FL... blimey.
I'd appreciate a couple of bits of info that won't impinge on your trade secrets!
Which head do you use? Which stitching application?
Roy
Nodalninja5 ( I modified it a little for my needs)
PTgui
..and no viewpointcorrection. With this resulution one would always see this.
Logged
EricWHiss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2412



WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2009, 11:58:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Brilliant work and stunning results.  I'm very impressed! Thank you for sharing this!
Regards,
Eric Hiss
Logged

Authorized Rolleiflex Dealer:
Find product information, download user manuals, or purchase online - Rolleiflex USA
gdwhalen
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 162


WWW
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2009, 08:14:41 PM »
ReplyReply

Impressive for sure.  Very well done.
Logged

BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7984



WWW
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2009, 07:41:35 AM »
ReplyReply

Very nice indeed.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad