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Author Topic: Glamorgan Castle  (Read 4738 times)
dalethorn
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« on: August 17, 2009, 03:43:11 PM »
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Panasonic ZS3.
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Ed Blagden
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2009, 10:53:42 PM »
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I can't see the point of this photograph.
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kikashi
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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2009, 02:36:02 AM »
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Quote from: Ed B
I can't see the point of this photograph.
Well, I suppose it's a pretty enough building even though it's obviously nowhere near as old as its design might suggest. The sky is very blotchy: I don't know whether it's noise or just jpeg artifact.

Perhaps Dale could explain what it's for.

Jeremy
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dalethorn
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« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2009, 06:37:31 AM »
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Quote from: kikashi
Well, I suppose it's a pretty enough building even though it's obviously nowhere near as old as its design might suggest. The sky is very blotchy: I don't know whether it's noise or just jpeg artifact.
Perhaps Dale could explain what it's for.
Jeremy

Google glamorgan castle - it's all there. Interesting for several reasons. Finding a castle in the middle of a small town in Ohio is a unique experience.
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kikashi
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« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2009, 03:26:03 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Google glamorgan castle - it's all there. Interesting for several reasons. Finding a castle in the middle of a small town in Ohio is a unique experience.
Follies are often interesting. I was right about it being a fairly new building in the style of one much older, I see.

You still haven't explained why you took the shot, though. Whilst coming across a castle in a small town in Ohio may be an unusual experience (beware of claiming that anything is unique!), I don't get any of that feeling from your image. There's no context: it might as well have been in the middle of nowhere.

Jeremy
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dalethorn
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« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2009, 07:20:04 PM »
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Quote from: kikashi
Follies are often interesting. I was right about it being a fairly new building in the style of one much older, I see.
You still haven't explained why you took the shot, though. Whilst coming across a castle in a small town in Ohio may be an unusual experience (beware of claiming that anything is unique!), I don't get any of that feeling from your image. There's no context: it might as well have been in the middle of nowhere.
Jeremy

I fail to understand why building a stunningly beautiful home, filled with beautiful objects d'art would be a folly. Perhaps you're one of those people who don't enjoy art or beautiful, unusual architecture.

The meaning here is just as simple as art or life itself, or for some people, just as mysterious.

And indeed, it could have been in the middle of nowhere, but now that you google'd it, you know more than that.

BTW, this is a place you can walk through, touch, and photograph at will.
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Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2009, 08:30:54 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
I fail to understand why building a stunningly beautiful home, filled with beautiful objects d'art would be a folly. Perhaps you're one of those people who don't enjoy art or beautiful, unusual architecture.

The meaning here is just as simple as art or life itself, or for some people, just as mysterious.

And indeed, it could have been in the middle of nowhere, but now that you google'd it, you know more than that.

BTW, this is a place you can walk through, touch, and photograph at will.

Ummm...
"Folly" is a technical term in architecture, not an informal pejorative. A folly is a non-functional structure that superficially mimics a historic form for purely æsthetic reasons. For example, a faux-lighthouse, or a faux-castle keep. These were quite popular among the English aristocracy circa 1700 - 1850 or so.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2009, 08:54:19 PM »
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Quote from: Geoff Wittig
Ummm...
"Folly" is a technical term in architecture, not an informal pejorative. A folly is a non-functional structure that superficially mimics a historic form for purely æsthetic reasons. For example, a faux-lighthouse, or a faux-castle keep. These were quite popular among the English aristocracy circa 1700 - 1850 or so.

I've toured several medieval castles in Germany, and while Glamorgan isn't old, funky, mossy, etc. like the German buildings, it has the quality and heavy-duty build, not to mention style that the faux buildings lack. There's a faux castle on PCH North of downtown Malibu, but it's not in the same league as Glamorgan.
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2009, 09:55:00 PM »
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For me it isn't about what it is 'about' ... I understand the sensibility that wants 'photography' to be distinct from 'painting' ... but I don't share it.

For me, images captured with a camera that are simply beautiful can stand on their own as art without a connection to time and/or human events.

Usually, lighting is key to that.  Beautiful light helps make beautiful photographic images.

That's my take here ... the light isn't doing you any favors.
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kikashi
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« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2009, 02:52:23 AM »
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Quote from: Geoff Wittig
Ummm...
"Folly" is a technical term in architecture, not an informal pejorative. A folly is a non-functional structure that superficially mimics a historic form for purely æsthetic reasons. For example, a faux-lighthouse, or a faux-castle keep. These were quite popular among the English aristocracy circa 1700 - 1850 or so.
Thank you! That saved me the trouble of explaining the word.

Jeremy
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dalethorn
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« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2009, 03:13:48 PM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
For me it isn't about what it is 'about' ... I understand the sensibility that wants 'photography' to be distinct from 'painting' ... but I don't share it.
For me, images captured with a camera that are simply beautiful can stand on their own as art without a connection to time and/or human events.
Usually, lighting is key to that.  Beautiful light helps make beautiful photographic images.
That's my take here ... the light isn't doing you any favors.

I didn't see this until someone sent me the link. Speaking of light, here's another view of the castle for comparison, taken several months apart from the first. The light with this image is flat, the sky plain and drab, no interesting shadows, etc.  In the first, the light is terrific, or so say the hundred or so people who've seen it.
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ARD
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« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2009, 03:27:26 PM »
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It's a well taken photograph, but looks like something from a 'For Sale' brochure.

To make a building like this stand out you need to explore different angles, DOF, Lens options etc.

Possibly HDR, B&W, dusk or dawn etc
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dalethorn
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« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2009, 03:52:05 PM »
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Quote from: ARD
It's a well taken photograph, but looks like something from a 'For Sale' brochure.
To make a building like this stand out you need to explore different angles, DOF, Lens options etc.
Possibly HDR, B&W, dusk or dawn etc

I hope you're referring to the second photo here, not the first. I thought these two made an interesting contrast.
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2009, 03:56:14 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
In the first, the light is terrific

The first two words that come to mind are 'cold' and 'harsh' ... not 'terrific'.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2009, 04:09:36 PM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
The first two words that come to mind are 'cold' and 'harsh' ... not 'terrific'.

Cold and harsh got your attention.  Success!

BTW: Castles do tend to be cold and harsh - we English and Welsh expect that. It wouldn't be the same warm and soft.
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ARD
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« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2009, 04:59:03 AM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
I hope you're referring to the second photo here, not the first. I thought these two made an interesting contrast.

Actually refering to either of them. I do not want to sound negative, but for a building such as this it is the photographer that makes the photo interesting, not the subject.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 04:59:27 AM by ARD » Logged
Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2009, 06:12:17 AM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
I hope you're referring to the second photo here, not the first.

Which is it?  

Are you trying to shoot great-looking, high-quality images or are you trying to shoot snapshots for your content and memory- oriented audience?

Sometimes you seem to be saying one thing and sometimes the other.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2009, 06:45:35 AM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
Which is it?  
Are you trying to shoot great-looking, high-quality images or are you trying to shoot snapshots for your content and memory- oriented audience?
Sometimes you seem to be saying one thing and sometimes the other.

A great prophet once said "unless a man hates his brother he cannot follow me."  And elsewhere he said "love everyone, even your enemies."  People of limited understanding see a contradiction, yet there is none.  Like art and beauty, which are complex and difficult for average minds to understand, so it is with what I "seem to be saying, one thing and sometimes the other."
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kikashi
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« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2009, 12:06:40 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Cold and harsh got your attention.  Success!

BTW: Castles do tend to be cold and harsh - we English and Welsh expect that. It wouldn't be the same warm and soft.
I don't agree. Shoot a castle in the warmth of an English summer evening (seizing the rare occasions on which we get a summer evening that's warm) and the glow can make it look wonderful. Think of Leeds castle, for example.

Jeremy
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kikashi
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« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2009, 12:08:16 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
A great prophet once said "unless a man hates his brother he cannot follow me."  And elsewhere he said "love everyone, even your enemies."  People of limited understanding see a contradiction, yet there is none.  Like art and beauty, which are complex and difficult for average minds to understand, so it is with what I "seem to be saying, one thing and sometimes the other."
I can't find the first quotation, but I confess my biblical knowledge is limited.

I also have to confess that I've no idea what you're talking about.

Jeremy
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