Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: 5x4 ? But I know diddly-squat !  (Read 4126 times)
Ti29er
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« on: August 26, 2009, 09:39:10 AM »
ReplyReply

Stepping up to 5x4?
I have been toying with this for a while.

I have D700’s and ‘blad & Leica film cameras, but on my travels I keep thinking, ”Wonder how that would look at 5x4?”
Funds are not extensive, so we’re looking at 2nd hand, and I think it’d have to be film and not digital.
But where to begin?
Ain’t that a $million question?!
It’s going to need to be portable as we’re talking about landscapes to begin with.
I was looking at a Sinar f2 kit, which looks about right, but am I barking up the wrong tree here?
As a professional photographer I know so little about 5x4 and need to do this to expand my possibilities and knowledge. Some of the places I visit and photograph are going to be worth my while taking the time to get it right.

All thoughts and comments greatly received.
Thanks
Ti
Logged
uaiomex
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1001


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2009, 09:52:58 AM »
ReplyReply

It looks to me that you should start considering a wooden field camera.
They are small, light, inexpensive and a joy to the eye.
Look for a new Tachihara, Ebony and Chamonix. Or used Zone VI, etc.
Eduardo

Quote from: Ti29er
Funds are not extensive, so we’re looking at 2nd hand, and I think it’d have to be film and not digital.
But where to begin?
Ain’t that a $million question?!
It’s going to need to be portable as we’re talking about landscapes to begin with.

Ti
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8080



WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2009, 10:18:38 AM »
ReplyReply

This might help...

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/lf-appeal.shtml

I have been using the camera less recently, mostly because of the cost of film.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Hank
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 679


« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2009, 10:24:05 AM »
ReplyReply

I agree on a used Tach or Zone VI and a couple of lenses, maybe a 210 and a 90.  It won't set you back all that much.

We've been shooting pro for 20 years, picking up digital about 10 years ago.  Throughout that span there has been a constant, low level need for 4x5, to the tune of roughly 200 frames a year.  All but a few uses centered around the need for the 4x5 body movements.  In the last few years 4x5 is the only film we have shot, but I think once you become accustomed to the gear and understand it's specific advantages, you to may find occasional uses in your pro shooting.  

For the learning, I'd recommend also picking up a Polaroid back, which you can use not only to pop a few polaroids during the early learning phases rather than waiting for film processing, but also as a general purpose film holder for quick load film.  We never use our mountain of film holders for sheet film any more, instead using quick loads for convenience.  That's a good approach for learning due to ease and convenience, even if more expensive that sheet film.  If you're shooting lots, yeah, move on to sheet film.  But the savings will come at the expense of effort in the short term while you're learning.
Logged
KevinA
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 898


WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2009, 10:29:21 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Ti29er
Stepping up to 5x4?
I have been toying with this for a while.

I have D700’s and ‘blad & Leica film cameras, but on my travels I keep thinking, ”Wonder how that would look at 5x4?”
Funds are not extensive, so we’re looking at 2nd hand, and I think it’d have to be film and not digital.
But where to begin?
Ain’t that a $million question?!
It’s going to need to be portable as we’re talking about landscapes to begin with.
I was looking at a Sinar f2 kit, which looks about right, but am I barking up the wrong tree here?
As a professional photographer I know so little about 5x4 and need to do this to expand my possibilities and knowledge. Some of the places I visit and photograph are going to be worth my while taking the time to get it right.

All thoughts and comments greatly received.
Thanks
Ti


I would start here http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/ a wealth of knowledge and friendly with it. What a journey you are thinking of starting. Film choice and processing choices will turn your head inside out, but so much fun. Keep it simple to start with.

Kevin.

Kevin.
Logged

Kevin.
jasonrandolph
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 554


WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2009, 10:36:58 AM »
ReplyReply

You may want to start with a Speed Graphic before you step up to more expensive gear.  They're all over Ebay.  Sure, it doesn't have the controls of a tried-and-true field camera, but it will familiarize you with the process, especially development.  I haven't used mine for a couple years because it's just too tedious and time consuming to do.  And if you don't develop your own film, it can get expensive very quick.  But back to the Speed Graphic, it's compact, easy to use, and depending on the condition, a bargain IMHO.
Logged

bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2009, 11:02:41 PM »
ReplyReply

I've got a super lightweight Anba Wood View and a Technika press style camera.  65 & 90 Super Angulons, 150 & 210 Symmars.  And a 300mm telephoto something that's almost impossible to use.  And a big black cloth and a magnifier.  And 17 film holders.  Haven't touched them in years.  I simply get better quality from stitching and PTGui gives me all the scheinflug I could ever desire.

Notwithstanding, there is something to the whole experience of a view camera that leads to a different image than you would get otherwise.  Perhaps a greater formality asserts itself.

And there is a kind of spiritual purity to the whole elaborate mechanical/chemical ceremony leading up to the print.  And the look of a highly expanded negative of a zero contrast subject blown up onto a lively silver paper with a cold light head is something not yet attainable in digital.  And the whole alchemy of developers and chemicals and toners and the melodious clank of print tongs on trays and the buz of Gralab timers and the tick-tick of metronomes and the smells of acetic acid and sodium thiosulphate and that exquisite 90 seconds of magic as the developer soaked slowly reveals itself must be experienced at least once in a lifetime.

But, um, I had enough back then.  Spiritual purity is too time consuming and too hard on the spine for one as old as I.
Logged
MarkL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 341


« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2009, 06:41:24 AM »
ReplyReply

Since this place is so digital focused, you may be better asking the guys over at www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/ to help you.

Still this is how I decided on my camera. Figure out:

1. How much weight you want to carry, this will affect the wood vs metal decision and also setup time (folding vs non-folding)

2. What lenses you want to use. Some cameras require recessed lens boards, bag bellows, or just can't fit the rear elements size for some lenses

3. Decide what movements you really need, particularly rear movements and asymmetrical movements. Unless you are shooting architecture and other very demanding things you may not need many.

I bought an Ebony RSW45 since I wanted light weight, ease of setup (non-folding) and for landscapes use only really needed front tilt and rise. This kept the cost and weight right down.

I have to say I hardly use it now I have my D700 and found out just how flexible stitching really is. I can't deal with the hassle of loading film holders totally dust free and the only b&w film left in quickload/readyload is acros which is £55 for 20 sheets! Shooting slide the cost gets beyond mad. This is what has really killed LF for me  
Logged
wollom
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 60


« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2009, 07:53:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Ti29er
Stepping up to 5x4?

(smilely thing) If you plan to walk the walk; maybe talk the talk.  In some circles there was a convention to talk format dimensions in 'small x large': 8x10, 5x7, 4x5, 6x9 etc.  But whoever said 4.5x6?

In so many ways large format is another language.

Mind you, the numbers would have been handy in these recent years of 'full frame' medium format measuring 36mmx49m.

Cheers

Wollom
Logged
adrian tyler
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 48


WWW
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2009, 01:40:37 AM »
ReplyReply

second mark's post, this is a great large format resorce:

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/

loading filmholders isn't that big a deal, the thing about cost though, you have to be really sure about what you are shooting...
« Last Edit: August 30, 2009, 02:09:29 AM by adrian tyler » Logged
ashley
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 94


WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2009, 09:54:46 AM »
ReplyReply

The Linhof Technika cameras are beautiful and compact. Many years ago when I was at college I remember the lightweight Sinar wolf. They couldn't be compared to the higher end Sinar cameras, but for something super light that still has movements it might be worth a look and I'll bet they are cheap nowadays if you can find them.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad