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Author Topic: Signing CANVAS Prints,with what do you sign them,where etc.  (Read 13079 times)
Snook
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« on: August 29, 2009, 08:56:50 AM »
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Hey guys, I have a pretty Big expo of my Photo Art coming up soon and was wondering the best way to sign canvas prints.
I am open to all suggestions. Do you guys sign the Front, Back, put any information on the back like one of a kind, the date, the year etc...
I am selling one of a kinds that only one will be produced and was looking for suggestions as what I should give my buyers when they purchase my art.
I have alreadt sold 7 to friends and others and need to sign them.
My only doubt is that the images are pretty busy (Pattern wise) so not sure just one ink color will be able to be seen if I sign the front of the art peice in the bottom corners.
Do people ever just sign the back of the canvas?

I would really appreciate any suggestions as I have about 35 1.45x1.10 meter pieces done and already framed, just need to sign them.
Thank you
Snook


PS. Is there any way of making like a template to paint them. or someway of making a solid little block that my name would go above it as the images are pretty busy and it would be hard to see my name.
Like a rectangler box in solid color with my signature on top of it.. Any way of making a spray paint type template and spraying my name etc... Open to any ideas specially something different than the traditional signing as the pieces are pretty modern.

Are there any colored paint pens that I could use, in order to sign with different colors on different backgrounds.. Like white paint on dark prints and or Black paint on lighter prints?
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 09:02:13 AM by Snook » Logged
ognita
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2009, 10:22:09 AM »
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Hi Snook,
First of all, congrats on your expo  I guess, you're pretty excited. Those are big prints(?), if I may say.
I cannot say what would be the best way to sign your work but I can share how I do mine. I chop (stamp) my logo on the paper. It's a Chinese character engraved in one of those stones used by the Chinese. I place it on the bottom left hand side just after the print. My signature will be on the right side with number over the series - pencil. The signing and all are made before it gets mounted (I see that your works are framed already...) I also give a COA - it'll bear the other details.

In doing so, the signature and chop will remain on the work should the owner choose to replace the frame.

A friend of mine, signs at the back of the print itself and another signs ON the print - Vincent style, colored pen. Do not worry much if your sign won't be that evident. It would be better if your work would be admired THEN they'll find out it's you, rather than the other way around.

Whatever method you choose, be consistent. How you sign your works will also be your 'signature.'

Best of luck!
ReD
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 10:29:07 AM by ognita » Logged

bill t.
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2009, 11:32:10 AM »
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"Pentel Sunburst Metallic MED Gel" in the Silver color is visible over any background color including white.  Nice thing about it is that it writes smoothly on bare, printed canvas, the only pen I have tried that allows a natural, flowing signature.  Does not run or smear when overcoated.  It's subtle enough not to intrude on the image, but easy to find if somebody looks.  Claimed to be fadeproof and permanent.

Sign the front, right over the image.  Most people like it, really!  You signature is lost on the back of the canvas especially if the framer decides to use a backing sheet which is getting more common with canvas framing.
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Snook
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2009, 01:29:26 PM »
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Thanks both of you for the great suggestions so far..
I just bought a PILOT super color "oil" pen in gold to try out on some canvas that I have that was trashed..
Do you guys know if that will ruin or hurt the canvas in any way. It says it contains no Xylene.
I also did a search on the internet and found Acrylic type style pens that come loaded with acrylic ink.
Does anybody know if that is OK for Photographic HP canvas's?? Just want to make sure I won't damaged the canvas.
Also I did not sign before hand becasue did not know exactly how much strectching would have eaten the borders and the canvas are full bleed with out any borders to sign.

Bill I will do a goodle for the product you mentioned but do you know where I can buy incase I do not find anything.

I think I will sign both front and back. I prefer back because my signature and name would/will be hard to read anyways and if anybody wants a peice they will ask who I am anyways like Red said.
So the recognition is not really what I am looking for up front but do want my peice signed and dated. Number is not important as they will all be one of a kind, atleast this series is.
Thank you very much.

PS> red they are pretty big but I wanted to print bigger but no one has the 66" inch printers where I live.. only the 44" with as long as I want..."+}
AS soon as the expo is out I will put the link here..
Snook

Just tried this oil pen and it worked pretty well actually...:+}
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 01:37:42 PM by Snook » Logged
bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2009, 01:56:46 PM »
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http://www.jetpens.com/product_info.php/products_id/1309

There are couple hundred suppliers on the net.  Most art supply stores also have them.

Haven't had any problems yet, have used them on at least 50+ prints.  I ruined a canvas using a DecoColor "Liquid Silver" marker, all of sudden a huge blob of pain flowed out past the tip.  The thing I like about the Pentels is they are very long lived and they don't hang up on the canvas texture so you get a natural looking signature, it's the only pen I found that's like that on canvas.

Let us know how your show goes, I've been interested in the one-only concept.
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Snook
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2009, 02:29:23 PM »
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Quote from: bill t.
http://www.jetpens.com/product_info.php/products_id/1309

There are couple hundred suppliers on the net.  Most art supply stores also have them.

Haven't had any problems yet, have used them on at least 50+ prints.  I ruined a canvas using a DecoColor "Liquid Silver" marker, all of sudden a huge blob of pain flowed out past the tip.  The thing I like about the Pentels is they are very long lived and they don't hang up on the canvas texture so you get a natural looking signature, it's the only pen I found that's like that on canvas.

Let us know how your show goes, I've been interested in the one-only concept.

Bill thanks for the link..
Seems to me the .7 is a little to thin for my prints as they are 1.45 meters x 1.10 meters more less. The thick "Oil" Paint Pen I just tried seems pretty good.
Going to let it dry for a day or 2 and see if there is anything strange it may produce, but so far seems pretty good.
The pens you mention would be way to small for my prints, but I am sure they probably make some thicker ones...
Thanks for the help..:+}

Snook


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bill t.
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2009, 03:59:37 PM »
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I like to keep my signature "normal" size even on the 44" tall panos, it enhances the perceived scale of the image. Very big signatures tend to drag down the scale of very big prints.
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Snook
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2009, 07:06:29 PM »
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Quote from: bill t.
I like to keep my signature "normal" size even on the 44" tall panos, it enhances the perceived scale of the image. Very big signatures tend to drag down the scale of very big prints.


That is a good point!!!

Thanks again.. will be practicing my signature alot before I actually do them...:+}

Snook
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ognita
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2009, 07:45:25 PM »
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Thanks for the tip bill =) I might try get my hand in one of those. I'm just not sure what would it look like beside my red stamp (logo)

Snook, yes please do provide the link  and oh, have you thought of writing 1/1 beside your signature? that could make it more special
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Panopeeper
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2009, 11:27:23 PM »
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I have a question; pls take into consideration, that I am not biased by any related knowledge.

Why don't you scan in the signature and overlay it before printing? Is the "hand signed" so important? Can that not be faked in PS?
Does it have to be done by pencil, so that the buyers can try to erase it, verifying if it is really hand-signed? (Ok, this question is not serious.)
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Gabor
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« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2009, 12:25:49 AM »
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Hi Panopeeper,
It does not have to be anything - pencil or otherwise. It could be in any way you'd want it. It does not even HAVE to be signed.
But if you have the chance of doing it, would you not do it by hand?

ReD
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bill t.
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« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2009, 01:05:12 AM »
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In practical terms hand-signed pieces sell for a lot more than unsigned prints.  Galleries will always want you to hand-sign your pieces.  One concept is that offering unsigned prints gives one the option of having cheap editions without compromising more expensive signed editions.

It's easy to identify hand-signed versus printed signatures, all it takes is sharp eyes or a magnifier.  Just from reflection differences it's easy to see whether or not the signature is ON the surface of the print or part of the reproduction process.

There's something kinda traumatic about signing prints, I really felt nervous about it for quite a while and I muffed a few signatures here and there.  That's why I like the smooth flowing Pentels (for canvas), I can use my normal writing motion rather than having to slow down unnaturally.  Interesting thing happens when you slow down a signature too much, you tend to wind up with the grade school version of your signature.
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Snook
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« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2009, 09:26:05 AM »
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Quote from: Panopeeper
I have a question; pls take into consideration, that I am not biased by any related knowledge.

Why don't you scan in the signature and overlay it before printing? Is the "hand signed" so important? Can that not be faked in PS?
Does it have to be done by pencil, so that the buyers can try to erase it, verifying if it is really hand-signed? (Ok, this question is not serious.)

Pano, Bills last comment is correct. Not only did the gallery want me to sign them, but the people who have bought some already.
I also felt I wanted to sign them. For me it really did not matter to sign the front or back. It's not an ego thing at all.

Also like I had mentioned in a previuos post, I did not know how they would be perfectly align after stretching was done and I do not have borders and I have 35 already ready framed, so this had to be done after the fact.
I really like the gold and silver oil type paint pens I tried yesterday and will go with them. Bill did put a seed in my head as to the size of the signature...        
Thank for the comments

Snook
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BlasR
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« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2009, 10:19:29 AM »
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Quote from: Panopeeper
I have a question; pls take into consideration, that I am not biased by any related knowledge.

Why don't you scan in the signature and overlay it before printing? Is the "hand signed" so important? Can that not be faked in PS?
Does it have to be done by pencil, so that the buyers can try to erase it, verifying if it is really hand-signed? (Ok, this question is not serious.)


I sold, 201 photos to the Marriot, they ask me to sign it.

I send my signature, with a cd, to the person the print them.

Much better then go and do it in person.

So for one to 5 photos, will be ok, for 100s take to long,

Photoshop will do it.

BlasR
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sayitloudbap
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« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2009, 11:35:29 AM »
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If it is for a friend who i trust totally (one who won't just copy my stuff and say it is there and such) then I actually sign the back corner and date it.  just so they can say "see look, he even signed it".  if i don't know the person i will bottom corner, not too close to the edge... which ever side i felt would be hardest to erase yet less disruptive to the picture.

If i don't like the person i make sure to do a large John Handcock straight down the middle of the picture with a thick sharpie.
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blansky
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« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2009, 12:12:15 PM »
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I agree with one of the above posters. I sign everything with photoshop. Scan your signature then add it to photoshop as a brush. Then you can sign any size, any color and anything you want. You can also scan a few different signatures to make them look "real", since most people can't sign each print in an identical manner.

In the past I've used a number of methods, gold leaf tape, Sanford gold and silver pens and others. But part of the problem is, the signature is done at the end of the process and I have had "skips" and places where the pen didn't adhere evenly and had to scramble to try to correct it and created a bit of a mess of a signature.

With photoshop, it's always perfect.
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Peter Mellis
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« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2009, 12:51:22 PM »
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Are you signing before or after applying whatever it is that you use to coat/protect the surface?
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bill t.
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« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2009, 02:58:10 PM »
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I always sign on the uncoated print then coat over that.

Another option is to sign after the first coat, then put additional coats over that.  If you have trouble with the pen hanging up or drying up on the hungry canvas before you finish your signature, you may be better off with the after-the-first-coat technique, please note that will probably require a solvent based pen to adhere nicely to the coating.  The Pentels sign very nicely on bare canvas prints and with water based coatings do not streak or bleed or hangup or dry halfway through the signature.

Look guys...YOU GOTTA HAND SIGN YOUR PRINTS!  It's just crazy not to, it can hugely affect the selling price and desirability of your work.  A non hand-signed print will be valued closer to a cheap printing press reproduction than to a fine art print, and collectors won't touch 'em.  The highest hourly rate you will ever earn is the time you spend hand signing your prints.
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Snook
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« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2009, 07:49:18 PM »
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Quote from: bill t.
I always sign on the uncoated print then coat over that.

Another option is to sign after the first coat, then put additional coats over that.  If you have trouble with the pen hanging up or drying up on the hungry canvas before you finish your signature, you may be better off with the after-the-first-coat technique, please note that will probably require a solvent based pen to adhere nicely to the coating.  The Pentels sign very nicely on bare canvas prints and with water based coatings do not streak or bleed or hangup or dry halfway through the signature.

Look guys...YOU GOTTA HAND SIGN YOUR PRINTS!  It's just crazy not to, it can hugely affect the selling price and desirability of your work.  A non hand-signed print will be valued closer to a cheap printing press reproduction than to a fine art print, and collectors won't touch 'em.  The highest hourly rate you will ever earn is the time you spend hand signing your prints.


I do not do any coating so before coating would be my answer..

Snook

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ognita
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« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2009, 08:16:20 PM »
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Not having a perfect signature goes to show that there's a "human element" on the work.
It's personalized.
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