Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: New Canon "L" series 100mm Macro Lens (with IS)  (Read 9350 times)
JohnKoerner
Guest
« on: September 04, 2009, 08:53:26 AM »
ReplyReply

Lost in the hullaballoo over the new 7D is the fact Canon has now come out with an "L" series 100mm macro lens.

Canon claims their new EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM "unrivalled" ...

Can't wait to read the reviews on this one ...


http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controll...p;modelid=19091



.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 08:54:45 AM by JohnKoerner » Logged
JohnKoerner
Guest
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2009, 09:11:18 AM »
ReplyReply

Apparently, this new macro lens is the very first lens in Canon's lineup to incorporate and all-new kind of image stabilization too.


http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/content_p...d=7-10041-10185





NEW CANON HYBRID IS WORLD’S FIRST IMAGE STABILIZER
TO COMPENSATE FOR TWO TYPES OF CAMERA SHAKE


 
LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., July 22, 2009 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, announced today the development of Hybrid Image Stabilizer (IS), the world’s first* optical image stabilization technology that compensates for both angle camera shake and shift camera shake. The technology will be featured in interchangeable single lens reflex (SLR) camera lens planned for commercial release before the end of 2009.
 
Several different preventative methods and corrective procedures have been introduced to compensate for errors caused by camera shake, which occurs when a camera moves while its shutter is open and its image sensor is exposed to light.
 
Canon began researching methods to compensate for camera shake in the 1980s, and in 1995 launched the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM, the world’s first interchangeable SLR camera lens to feature a mechanism that compensates for optical camera shake. Since then, the company has continued to produce a variety of interchangeable lenses with image stabilization capabilities, and boasts a total of 21 such lenses in its current product lineup.
 
Canon’s newly developed Hybrid IS technology optimally compensates for angle and shift camera shake. Sudden changes in camera angle can significantly affect images taken during standard shooting, whereas shift-based shaking, which occurs when a camera moves parallel to the imaging scene, is more pronounced in macro photography and other close-range shooting.
 
The new Hybrid IS technology incorporates an angular velocity sensor that detects the extent of angle-based shaking and is found in all previous Canon optical image stabilizer mechanisms, as well as a new acceleration sensor that determines the amount of shift-based camera shake. Hybrid IS also employs a newly developed algorithm that synthesizes information from the two sensors to make optimal adjustments, thereby dramatically enhancing the effects of image stabilization during shooting, including macro shooting, which had proven difficult for conventional image stabilization technologies.
 
Canon is actively engaged in ongoing research and development of interchangeable SLR camera lenses incorporating Hybrid IS technology, and is aiming for the early commercialization and inclusion of the lenses in a wide range of products.
 
....



.



.
Logged
K.C.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 654


« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2009, 05:29:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: JohnKoerner
Lost in the hullaballoo over the new 7D is the fact Canon has now come out with an "L" series 100mm macro lens.

I wouldn't say it was lost, just a lot less interest. This is the third generation of the 100 Macro from Canon and it's not nearly as important in the market as the 7D.

The previous generation 100M is a standard for sharpness and quality, though also known for slow focus that often 'hunts.' It's widely used as a portrait lens.

Adding L glass and IS will be mute points if the auto focus hasn't been improved.

Better than Zeiss ? That'll be subjective, both are great lenses.
Logged
madmanchan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2110


« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2009, 08:00:06 PM »
ReplyReply

May I ask why fast AF is important for a macro lens? Is the idea that you would be photographing small fast-moving insects? Just trying to understand here ...
Logged

marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1724



« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2009, 08:57:13 PM »
ReplyReply

IS in a macro lens! I guess my Tokina 100mm Macro is up for sale! Hope the Canon has good Bokeh.
Marc
Logged

Marc McCalmont
stever
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1065


« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2009, 10:12:26 PM »
ReplyReply

there are a couple of reasons for wanting reasonably fast autofocus in the 100 macro, not all related to macrophotography

- photographing insects is one, but the the 100M is a great lens for photographing small fish underwater and focus speed is important

- f2.8 is reasonably fast for a 100mm lens and the optical quality of the lens makes it very desirable as a general purpose short telephoto - if it would focus faster
Logged
JohnKoerner
Guest
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2009, 11:06:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: K.C.
I wouldn't say it was lost, just a lot less interest. This is the third generation of the 100 Macro from Canon and it's not nearly as important in the market as the 7D.

Perhaps. But I would beg to differ on the issue of importance. The fact is, camera bodies change with much more frequency than do lenses, so the advent of a "new camera" is a yearly thing, while the advent of a new generation lens can sometimes take more than a decade. More than this, Canon invented image stabilization to begin with, and now they have launched a "new generation" of image stabilization again, which means they are once again leading the way with innovation while everyone else plays catch-up.

Further still, with the sensor technology of camera bodies getting to a point that older-generation lenses are starting to get exposed as "flawed," the fact that Canon is now backing-up their incredible new-generation cameras with new-generation glass to go with it is exciting news for those invested in Canon. The 100mm USM IS macro is the first step in this new technology, which quite frankly I feel is every bit as important (arguably more so) than a new body.

I am willing to bet that a new-age Canon 100-400 zoom (long overdue) is soon to come out also, with this latest technology, which is something I too have been waiting for.




Quote from: K.C.
The previous generation 100M is a standard for sharpness and quality, though also known for slow focus that often 'hunts.' It's widely used as a portrait lens.

Agreed. I love my copy.




Quote from: K.C.
Adding L glass and IS will be mute points if the auto focus hasn't been improved.

I disagree. I seldom use autofocus for macro, if ever. The only exception to this would be species identification, where I want to first "document" seeing a new species of insect with a quick (and halfway decent) shot ... before I settle in and really try to nail it with a manual focus attempt.




Quote from: K.C.
Better than Zeiss ? That'll be subjective, both are great lenses.

Well, it will be better than Zeiss on many levels: (1) Autofocus, of which Zeiss has none; (2) true 1:1 macro ability, of which Zeiss has none; and (3) the new image stabilization, of which no other company has a peer. Whether the actual sharpness and bokeh can equal a Zeiss remains to be seen, but if the Canon is on a par with Zeiss here, then it will be by far the better lens, for less money too.




_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________




Quote from: marcmccalmont
IS in a macro lens! I guess my Tokina 100mm Macro is up for sale! Hope the Canon has good Bokeh.
Marc

Mine are already up for sale Marc  


Jack


.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 11:07:22 PM by JohnKoerner » Logged
Thomas Krüger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 452



WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2009, 11:25:41 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: JohnKoerner
Well, it will be better than Zeiss on many levels: (1) Autofocus, of which Zeiss has none; (2) true 1:1 macro ability, of which Zeiss has none; and (3) the new image stabilization, of which no other company has a peer. Whether the actual sharpness and bokeh can equal a Zeiss remains to be seen, but if the Canon is on a par with Zeiss here, then it will be by far the better lens, for less money too.

Using a Sony Alpha 850 or 900 with the good old Sony Alpha (exMinolta) 100/2.8 Macro is another fine combination. Instead of the Canon lens IS you get the Sony SteadyShot INSIDE™ to "offer up to 4.0 steps anti-shake performance with ALL lenses".
http://photo.net/equipment/sony/100macro/
Logged
K.C.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 654


« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2009, 04:19:54 AM »
ReplyReply


I agree. The SONY 100 Macro is an equal to the second generation Canon.

I'll be buying an A850 just for the Zeiss lenses offered for it. I think we'll be seeing more Zeiss glass for SONY next year.

I shot with Leica Rs for years and the Zeiss 100 is amazing. All they have to do is change the mount and add autofocus.
Logged
Josh-H
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1910



WWW
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2009, 04:39:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I agree. The SONY 100 Macro is an equal to the second generation Canon.

LOL!
How can you say that? The Canon hasn't been released yet!
Logged

K.C.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 654


« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2009, 06:22:16 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Josh-H
LOL!
How can you say that? The Canon hasn't been released yet!


The LOL is on you. The new L IS 100M lens is the third generation. I was referring to, as you quoted me, the second generation.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2009, 06:23:02 AM by K.C. » Logged
budjames
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 690


WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2009, 06:25:32 AM »
ReplyReply

I own the old Canon 100 macro and it is in deed one very sharp prime.

One issue that is an upgrade question for me is that the "old" version has a 58mm filter size. The new "L" 100 macro has a 67mm filter size. My guess is that my Canon MR-14X flash ring will not fit the new lens. An new lens requiring a new flash might be an expensive upgrade.

Bud
Logged

Bud James
North Wales, PA
www.budjamesphotography.com
JohnKoerner
Guest
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2009, 08:00:28 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: ThomasK
Using a Sony Alpha 850 or 900 with the good old Sony Alpha (exMinolta) 100/2.8 Macro is another fine combination. Instead of the Canon lens IS you get the Sony SteadyShot INSIDE™ to "offer up to 4.0 steps anti-shake performance with ALL lenses".
http://photo.net/equipment/sony/100macro/


No doubt, I have seen some wonderful shots taken with Sony/Minolta macros.

I myself am very happy with my Canon 50D and 100mm combo. The only reservations I've had have been with the so-so weather sealing of the 50D, and the pretty cheap 'feel' of the 100mm macro, but performance-wise I have been very pleased with both.

It is my belief that the 7D combined with an 'L' level 100mm macro will cover all the bases I need covered and satisfy me for many, many years to come.


.
Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8083



WWW
« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2009, 09:00:56 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: JohnKoerner
It is my belief that the 7D combined with an 'L' level 100mm macro will cover all the bases I need covered and satisfy me for many, many years to come.
or at least until next year!  
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
K.C.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 654


« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2009, 03:00:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: budjames
I own the old Canon 100 macro and it is in deed one very sharp prime.

One issue that is an upgrade question for me is that the "old" version has a 58mm filter size. The new "L" 100 macro has a 67mm filter size. My guess is that my Canon MR-14X flash ring will not fit the new lens. An new lens requiring a new flash might be an expensive upgrade.

Bud

I use a Canon step up ring to adapt the MR-14X to the 180 Macro, which is 72mm. I'm sure they'll have one for the new 100M.

The 180M, by the way, makes the second gen 100M pale by comparison. It redefines sharp.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2009, 03:01:54 PM by K.C. » Logged
Josh-H
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1910



WWW
« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2009, 05:08:25 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
The new L IS 100M lens is the third generation. I was referring to, as you quoted me, the second generation.

Ahh.. my bad.. Apologies I did not realise this is the third iteration of the 100mm.

I must say the MTF for this new lens is pretty amazing - certainly interested in seeing some samples.
Logged

Chris Pollock
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 213


« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2009, 03:24:30 AM »
ReplyReply

I see it's listed on Yodobashi Camera for ¥113,400. They give you 10% points for it, so you could effectively take 10% off the price.

http://www.yodobashi.com/ec/product/100000...J_eLAGdzbt0ah0I.

For that money it might be worth buying, if the optical quality is up to scratch. As has already been said, it could be a good portrait lens, even if it's designed for macro work. Does anyone know if there's a disadvantage to using a macro lens for shooting distant objects?
Logged
englishm
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 134


WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2009, 10:44:38 AM »
ReplyReply

[quote name='JohnKoerner' date='Sep 4 2009, 09:06 PM' post='308395']


>>Well, it will be better than Zeiss on many levels: (1) Autofocus, of which Zeiss has none; (2) true 1:1 macro ability, of which Zeiss has none; <<

The Zeiss Makro Sonnar for the Contax SLR mount actually does focus to 1:1.  I know, since I owned one and a bunch of other Zeiss glass up to time I foolishly sold all of it in the early 2000's.

Logged

JohnKoerner
Guest
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2009, 06:53:45 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: budjames
I own the old Canon 100 macro and it is in deed one very sharp prime.
One issue that is an upgrade question for me is that the "old" version has a 58mm filter size. The new "L" 100 macro has a 67mm filter size. My guess is that my Canon MR-14X flash ring will not fit the new lens. An new lens requiring a new flash might be an expensive upgrade.
Bud

I have the MT-24 Ringlight Flash and I am sure Canon will put out an adapter ring to match the fit as they do with the 180mm.




______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________




Quote from: K.C.
I use a Canon step up ring to adapt the MR-14X to the 180 Macro, which is 72mm. I'm sure they'll have one for the new 100M.
The 180M, by the way, makes the second gen 100M pale by comparison. It redefines sharp.

Exactly.

One thing I am curious about also is whether or not Canon will soon come out with another-generation 180mm 'L' macro with this new IS technology. It almost makes me want to slow down a minute and wait and see, since the added distance-to-shoot would be well worth the wait to get the bigger lens this time ...




______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________




Quote from: EricM
or at least until next year!  

Ha ha!

Actually, I am well satisfied with the equipment I have ... but with the reservations mentioned. If my 50D had the features (and especially the weather sealing) of the 7D I would not be inclined to upgrade. If my 100mm macro were 'L'-quality in build I would never get rid of it. The 7D is the exact kind of camera I want, the 50D is close. The 100mm 'L' is the exact kind of macro I want, the non-'L' is close but feels a little cheap.




______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________




Quote from: englishm
The Zeiss Makro Sonnar for the Contax SLR mount actually does focus to 1:1.  I know, since I owned one and a bunch of other Zeiss glass up to time I foolishly sold all of it in the early 2000's.

It is my understanding that the elder Zeiss/Contax macros were, yes, 1:1 in ratio. However, the current ones are not:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/4725...#specifications

Were the Zeiss a 1:1 lens, qualitatively it would be the exact kind of lens I would love to own forever. Just read the reviews on the Zeiss and it makes you want to buy one immediately. It is my hope that this new Canon 'L' lens will be comparable to the Zeiss in quality, both in build as well as in performance, but that it will have the extra advantage of autofocus (which occasionally is critical in macro, before a subject departs), the new IS technology, as well as a true 1:1 magnification.

Jack

.
.
Logged
Gary Ferguson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 524


WWW
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2009, 09:10:09 AM »
ReplyReply

This is great news and I've already put a deposit down at Mifsuds in the UK, although it hurts that once again the price is virtually US dollar for GB pound parity. At least I'll be defraying the cost by selling off my 85mm 1.2 (too heavy, no IS), 135mm 2.0 (no IS), and 180mm Macro (exquisite IQ, but only if tripod mounted).

I wonder if this, plus the recent launch of the 14mm MkII and 18mm/24mm T&S lenses, gives us any clues as to future Canon bodies and sensors? If many of the current lens line-up is already challenged by the 5D MkII and 1Ds MkIII, then it makes perfect sense for Canon to upgrade some old warhorse lenses before they became embarrassed by the potential resolution of, say, a 30+MPX 1Ds MkIV? Personally in the digital era I'd happily trade off a stop of aperture for better IQ in a lighter lens, and although I appreciate that IS isn't a perfect substitute for wider apertures in all cases, it certainly is in many cases.

Hopefully this won't be the end of the Canon lens developments, a 28mm 2.0L IS would be a wonderful thing!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad