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Author Topic: Epson 3800 or 3880?  (Read 9979 times)
Tom H.
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« on: September 04, 2009, 01:18:52 PM »
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With a $300.00 (CDN) rebate on for the old 3800, it's a pretty attractive offer.

Should I buy the old or the new? Is the newer ink tech worth the extra money?

I'm coming off an old 2200, so anything will be an improvement.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2009, 01:32:13 PM »
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Quote from: Tom H.
With a $300.00 (CDN) rebate on for the old 3800, it's a pretty attractive offer.

Should I buy the old or the new? Is the newer ink tech worth the extra money?

I'm coming off an old 2200, so anything will be an improvement.

Testing I did with very saturated originals in ProPhoto from Raw, I saw a difference but its hardly night and day. A lot depends on the work you do. If you're Pete Turner, yup, I'd go 3880 to squeeze out ever drop of saturation. Otherwise, the $300 you save will buy some ink and the 3800 is a superb unit. I've got both, I'll keep the 3880 of course, but the differences are not huge. The 3880 is faster, has a better/newer dither. But you can't go wrong with a 3800 with a deal either. Both are a huge jump in quality over a 2200!
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Andrew Rodney
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madmanchan
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2009, 08:02:08 PM »
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Out of curiosity, Andrew, how much faster is the 3880 than a 3800, when printing at equivalent quality settings?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2009, 08:10:48 PM »
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Quote from: madmanchan
Out of curiosity, Andrew, how much faster is the 3880 than a 3800, when printing at equivalent quality settings?

Wish I could tell you but the 3800 is now gone (off to a buddy).

I suspect the differences are that between the 4800 and 4880 or 7800/7880 etc.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 08:12:03 PM by digitaldog » Logged

Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2009, 08:43:34 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Wish I could tell you but the 3800 is now gone (off to a buddy).

I suspect the differences are that between the 4800 and 4880 or 7800/7880 etc.

Well I think I was off here, the spec's at least according to Epson show the 3800 and 3880 being the same speed for output:

High Performance Engine Speeds
Utilizing our latest high-performance print head technology, the SP3880 is among the fastest professional desktop printers in the industry
Print Mode   8 x 10   11 x 14   16 x 20
SuperFine - 1440 dpi HS   2:03   3:18   5:32
SuperFine - 1440 dpi   4:08   6:39   10:59
SuperPhoto - 2880 dpi HS   3:50   6:04   9:46
SuperPhoto - 2880 dpi   7:47   12:15   18:40

HS = High-Speed Print Mode (Bi-directional Print Mode) | Print speeds are shown in min:sec.

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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2009, 06:30:12 AM »
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I've been using the Epson R2400 since it came out. It replaced the Epson 2200 which replaced the Epson 2000P (a terrible printer).

I've been happy with the results, but I lust after the ability to print 16 x 20s which I can't do with the R2400.

It looks like the 3880 is the logical upgrade for a low volume user like me. I only print about 15-20 prints/month. Any issues with this low of a volume with the 3880 anyone?

Cheers.
Bud
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Bud James
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2009, 07:18:26 AM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Testing I did with very saturated originals in ProPhoto from Raw, I saw a difference but its hardly night and day. A lot depends on the work you do. If you're Pete Turner, yup, I'd go 3880 to squeeze out ever drop of saturation. Otherwise, the $300 you save will buy some ink and the 3800 is a superb unit. I've got both, I'll keep the 3880 of course, but the differences are not huge. The 3880 is faster, has a better/newer dither. But you can't go wrong with a 3800 with a deal either. Both are a huge jump in quality over a 2200!

Question?  Have you already received the Epson 3880? I have contacted IT Supplies and was inform the 3880 will not be available until late October early November.
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kikashi
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« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2009, 08:58:59 AM »
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Quote from: budjames
I've been using the Epson R2400 since it came out. It replaced the Epson 2200 which replaced the Epson 2000P (a terrible printer).

I've been happy with the results, but I lust after the ability to print 16 x 20s which I can't do with the R2400.

It looks like the 3880 is the logical upgrade for a low volume user like me. I only print about 15-20 prints/month. Any issues with this low of a volume with the 3880 anyone?

Cheers.
Bud
It's probably a little premature for this question as regards the 3880, but on the assumption that clogging and so on will be pretty much the same as the 3800, there shouldn't be any problems at all. I've had a 3800 for a little over a year and my print volume is similar to yours, perhaps a little less. It's often a good fortnight between prints. I've had one clog caused by (or at least following) a head strike because I forgot to open the front door to allow the paper to escape (idiot!). It cleared with a single cleaning cycle. Other than that, all has been well. The print quality is fantastic.

Jeremy
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abiggs
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« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2009, 09:14:11 AM »
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My hunch is the price difference is actually a bit more than the $300 rebate, as one can find the 3800 for around $1150 these days. That is a pretty amazing deal, once you factor in how much ink comes with the 3800 (around $450 or so).
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Andy Biggs
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2009, 10:23:11 AM »
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Quote from: StuartOnline
Question?  Have you already received the Epson 3880? I have contacted IT Supplies and was inform the 3880 will not be available until late October early November.

Final production, no. I've had a beta for many months.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2009, 12:19:16 PM »
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Quote from: Tom H.
Should I buy the old or the new? Is the newer ink tech worth the extra money?

I compared 3800 prints with my 7880 ones. To my eye vivid magenta makes most saturated azures, blues and violets look better. I also expected oranges to be more vibrant, but - to my disapointment - couldn't see a difference.

Grain is finer in x880 - actually you can't see a trace of screening wihout a loupe.

The differences are subtle, I suppose the 3800 is so good, that it's hard to get any significant improvement without changing the whole colorant set.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2009, 12:19:37 PM by Czornyj » Logged

eronald
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2009, 02:13:00 PM »
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Don't throw away the old printer. I made the mistake of selling my 2100 when moving on and regretted it.

Edmund

Quote from: digitaldog
Testing I did with very saturated originals in ProPhoto from Raw, I saw a difference but its hardly night and day. A lot depends on the work you do. If you're Pete Turner, yup, I'd go 3880 to squeeze out ever drop of saturation. Otherwise, the $300 you save will buy some ink and the 3800 is a superb unit. I've got both, I'll keep the 3880 of course, but the differences are not huge. The 3880 is faster, has a better/newer dither. But you can't go wrong with a 3800 with a deal either. Both are a huge jump in quality over a 2200!
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2009, 02:35:20 PM »
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Any opinions on whether or not the new printer prints deeper blacks than its' predecessor?

Graeme
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edwinb
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« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2009, 02:58:45 PM »
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Quote from: graeme
Any opinions on whether or not the new printer prints deeper blacks than its' predecessor?

Graeme

printing with the vivid inks in an x800 model gives flooding problems with the head
therefore it would appear that the new x880 head can cope with more ink

'Increased colour gamut, specifically in the blues & magentas enabling the reproduction of specific spot colours such as Rhodamine Red & Reflex Blue. Increases Pantone coverage to approx 85%.'3880 detailed specifications edwin
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Edwin Blenkinsopp
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« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2009, 03:27:15 PM »
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Quote from: eronald
Don't throw away the old printer. I made the mistake of selling my 2100 when moving on and regretted it.

I didn't throw it away (and in fact have never done so, I give them away). And I've been using a 3880 for many months so I know what to expect from it compared to the 3800.
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Andrew Rodney
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madmanchan
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« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2009, 07:23:48 PM »
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Quote from: graeme
Any opinions on whether or not the new printer prints deeper blacks than its' predecessor?

Graeme, moderately deeper on Photo Black-compatible papers. A useful improvement, but not staggering.

Little difference, if any, on Matte Black-compatible papers.
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« Reply #16 on: September 05, 2009, 11:07:44 PM »
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Quote from: madmanchan
Little difference, if any, on Matte Black-compatible papers.


No difference in the black D-Max of matte that's true but there will be improvement with deep colors in the oranges, reds, magenta and purples...

Look, it may be hard to pass a discount if money is really tight (although the 2880 might be a more realistic option) but at this point I would seriously suggest you DON'T buy almost 3 year old technology...sure, you'll be able to get ink for a while but the moment the 3880 ships, that will be the only printer that will be receiving longer term support and software updates.

Note, since the 3880 won't be shipping till Oct, the odds are there may need to be a 3800 driver update (I don't know this, but I'm thinking due to Snow Leopard it may) but after that the 3880 will be "current" and the 3800 will be "former" technology.

Seriously, I would buy the 3800 for $300 less...maybe 1/2 price, but if you can wait, you should. The color gamut is larger and the resolution output is worth it.
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budjames
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« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2009, 03:34:10 PM »
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Quote from: Schewe
No difference in the black D-Max of matte that's true but there will be improvement with deep colors in the oranges, reds, magenta and purples...

Look, it may be hard to pass a discount if money is really tight (although the 2880 might be a more realistic option) but at this point I would seriously suggest you DON'T buy almost 3 year old technology...sure, you'll be able to get ink for a while but the moment the 3880 ships, that will be the only printer that will be receiving longer term support and software updates.

Note, since the 3880 won't be shipping till Oct, the odds are there may need to be a 3800 driver update (I don't know this, but I'm thinking due to Snow Leopard it may) but after that the 3880 will be "current" and the 3800 will be "former" technology.

Seriously, I would buy the 3800 for $300 less...maybe 1/2 price, but if you can wait, you should. The color gamut is larger and the resolution output is worth it.

I agree with Jeff. The $300 cost savings amortized over the life of the printer is not worth it, particularly when you add up the cost of paper and ink during that you will consume during that time (2-3 years).

I'm guessing that the new 3880 will be on the Epson booth at the PhotoPlus show next month in NYC. I plan on going to check it out and to see what's new a Canon, Adobe and a few others.

Jeff, are you going this year?

Cheers.
Bud James
« Last Edit: September 06, 2009, 03:34:30 PM by budjames » Logged

Bud James
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« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2009, 11:16:31 PM »
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Quote from: budjames
Jeff, are you going this year?


Nope...but you are right in assuming you'll be able to see 3880's at the Epson booth. We may have them (can't promise) at Photoshop World/Vegas...(I'll be there...)
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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #19 on: September 08, 2009, 02:50:24 PM »
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Is the Max print length still about 37.25 inches as it was on the 3800? The only spec I've been able to find for the 3880 is 17x25.
Can someone confirm that the Epson driver for the 3880 can at the very least, print 37.25 long.
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Bill Koenig,
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