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Author Topic: A Millennium of Western Architectural Tradition  (Read 1556 times)
SCQ
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« on: September 21, 2009, 02:06:36 PM »
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[attachment=16752:L1002991.jpg]

This photo really doesn't do it justice. Having read and heard about the Pantheon and its influence on post-medieval architecture, one really does not get the full sense of its magnificence until stepping into it. I instantly understood once I went inside and saw it in the flesh. It's interesting because it looks surreal when you get in. The ceiling doesn't look architectural, but rather more like a painting.
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jasonrandolph
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2009, 02:57:01 PM »
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You've recorded some great light and nice intricate detail there.  There's one thing that bothers me about the composition.  The partial circle at the bottom right draws my eyes away from the oculus.  The problem is, I don't see how you could crop it out without taking something away from the beauty of the architecture you captured.  Perhaps stepping back a step or two would "complete" this area, as well as giving continuity to the circle that is cut off at the bottom.  Otherwise, the light is fantastic.  I really like how it drops off.
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SCQ
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2009, 05:37:55 PM »
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Quote from: jasonrandolph
You've recorded some great light and nice intricate detail there.  There's one thing that bothers me about the composition.  The partial circle at the bottom right draws my eyes away from the oculus.  The problem is, I don't see how you could crop it out without taking something away from the beauty of the architecture you captured.  Perhaps stepping back a step or two would "complete" this area, as well as giving continuity to the circle that is cut off at the bottom.  Otherwise, the light is fantastic.  I really like how it drops off.

Good point. That little corner has always bothered me a little. I suppose my excuse was that I was shooting very wide through a rangefinder without the proper framelines or viewfinder. I took a few, but none seem to measure up to this one in terms of composition/positioning of the oculus.

[attachment=16754:L1002941.jpg]
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jasonrandolph
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2009, 07:19:58 PM »
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I find the asymmetry of the original more enthralling.  I'd say stick to that one.  It's a minor issue on an otherwise excellent image!
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2009, 10:27:16 PM »
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I prefer the original composition up top. In fact I thought the quarter-circle on the bottom right of the frame was a nice touch, especially since the light coming in from the top sort of leads your eye in that direction. The only thing that bugs me a little is the larger circle being just barely clipped at the bottom center of the frame.
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RSL
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« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2009, 09:40:14 AM »
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I agree with Jeff. The round arch in the lower right gives you an idea of what else is involved -- outside the picture. I think it's critical to the composition.
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2009, 10:25:08 AM »
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The first one is great.  I've stood inside the Pantheon, and know just what you're talking about, and I think you've captured it about as well as one can.  Doing it in B&W helps a lot too.

Lisa
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cmi
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2009, 06:41:40 PM »
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The second almost looks like a spaceship with a lightbeam... love it
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