Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Another guy with 2690WuXi2 problems...  (Read 7338 times)
NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« on: October 03, 2009, 03:11:48 PM »
ReplyReply

So, I purchased an NEC 2690WuXi2 for work, calibrated with thei1basic - i1Pro spectrophotometer and i1Match Monitor profiling software, and it does not look good at all. There is a weird magenta color in the whites, a color shift from top right to bottom left (cyan to magenta) and I can see some weird color fringing along contrasty edges (especially through my eyeglasses). I've been searching the forum for the last 12 hours trying to find out if these problems can be fixed, or if I should return the monitor and buy something else. Please help! Here are the problems and possible solutions I have found. Please give me any more ideas you have, especially if you own this monitor and have it calibrated properly.

Color fringing:
- contrast too high

Magenta color overall:
- need SpectraView software (NEC color management)
- monitor specific driver
- bad calibration tool/software (EyeOne)
- native white point - enter the advanced menu, tag "8">factory preset and reset the display, then choose "NON" in tag 5, and "N" in tag 6

Color shift from one side to another:
- turn on "Uniformity Mode"
- faulty display

I am running, a Mac Pro quad core Xeon 2.66 with 10.5.8, brand new.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/lo...php/t20994.html
http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....032&hl=2690
http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....092&hl=2690

Thanks,
Nate
Logged
Czornyj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1422



WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2009, 03:34:57 PM »
ReplyReply

Did you calibrate the in the panel whitepoint using Tag 6, color control, temperature: custom, and changing RGB gain in accordance to i1match indications?

Did you enable the uniformity compensation (Tag 7)?
Logged

NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2009, 05:45:37 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Czornyj
Did you calibrate the in the panel whitepoint using Tag 6, color control, temperature: custom, and changing RGB gain in accordance to i1match indications?

Did you enable the uniformity compensation (Tag 7)?

No, I calibrated as I calibrate our 20" Apple Cinema Displays... there's not much monkeying to do. I did find those instructions somewhere else, as you can see above, and I will try that on Monday. What are these "tags", where are they found? Where did these instructions come from?
Logged
Czornyj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1422



WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2009, 10:41:08 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: NateTwedten
No, I calibrated as I calibrate our 20" Apple Cinema Displays... there's not much monkeying to do. I did find those instructions somewhere else, as you can see above, and I will try that on Monday. What are these "tags", where are they found? Where did these instructions come from?

From my experience

Activate advanced menu - switch the panel off, hold the input button, and swith it on (hold the input button while it starts).
Make the background white or grey, and enter the advanced menu, tag 7, activate "uniformity", and set it's strengh (uniformity level) to get rid of magenta-cyan color cast. Then go to tag 5 "gamma selection " and choose 2.2.
In i1match use the "advanced" and "LCD" mode, define target settings as 6500K, gamma 2,2 and 120-140cd.
Activate "Calibrate RGB" mode, put the spectro on the panel and enter advanced menu, Tag 6, set "5", temperature: custom, and change RGB gain values to get the i1match temperature indicators aligned. Then go further to calibrate luminance mode, calibrate the displays brightness to hit the target (120-140cd/m^2), and go back to "Calibrate RGB" to check if the temperature is still good, tune it up if there's such a need. Repet until  you hit the temperature and luminance targets, and then profile the display ("measuring").

If it's too complicated, buy excellent Spectraview II profiler - it will make all the above mentioned steps automatically (you only have to set uniformity level to your taste).
« Last Edit: October 04, 2009, 10:45:01 AM by Czornyj » Logged

NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2009, 09:05:33 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Czornyj
From my experience

Activate advanced menu - switch the panel off, hold the input button, and swith it on (hold the input button while it starts).
Make the background white or grey, and enter the advanced menu, tag 7, activate "uniformity", and set it's strengh (uniformity level) to get rid of magenta-cyan color cast. Then go to tag 5 "gamma selection " and choose 2.2.
In i1match use the "advanced" and "LCD" mode, define target settings as 6500K, gamma 2,2 and 120-140cd.
Activate "Calibrate RGB" mode, put the spectro on the panel and enter advanced menu, Tag 6, set "5", temperature: custom, and change RGB gain values to get the i1match temperature indicators aligned. Then go further to calibrate luminance mode, calibrate the displays brightness to hit the target (120-140cd/m^2), and go back to "Calibrate RGB" to check if the temperature is still good, tune it up if there's such a need. Repet until  you hit the temperature and luminance targets, and then profile the display ("measuring").

If it's too complicated, buy excellent Spectraview II profiler - it will make all the above mentioned steps automatically (you only have to set uniformity level to your taste).

I gave it another chance yesterday.

The Uniformity Mode helped, but there was still a noticable difference across the screen no matter what level I put it at. No matter how much manual RGB value calibration I did, I could still not get the colors to look normal. Reds were all tweaked out (mega saturated) and there was still that strange magenta look to the whites. I had to bring the luminance down to 90 to even make the brightness bearable. I still had a headache at the end of the day. The blacks were pretty washed out too.

We're definitely going to return this thing.
Logged
WillH
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 138


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2009, 10:06:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Trying to manually calibrate the display will drive you around in circles - especially when using some 3rd party software that knows nothing about the display [For example some instruct you to set the contrast to 100% which is just about the worst thing you can do to distort the video on this models. Others want you to adjust the black level which again is not a good idea]. I would highly recommend you get the SpectraView II kit so you can automatically calibrate everything and not have to worry about trying to manually set controls.

The over saturated reds are probably the result of:
a - Incorrect or missing monitor profile
b - Application not using the right profile
c - Application not aware of how to color correct for secondary displays (assuming you have the LCD2690 set up as the secondary display) - in which case you should try making it the primary.

Using a wide gamut display next to a standard display will always look "different". Magenta cast compared to your other display can be removed by making a different white point target for the display.

Color shift from one side of the display to the other when looking directly at the screen is not normal. Some green/magenta color shift is normal at larger angles - especially on dark areas of the screen. Contact Tech Support for a replacement unit if the color shift is not corrected with the uniformity correction.

I've included some items from our FAQs that may be of help. They are intended for use with SpectraView, but the concepts will work with other calibration applications:

http://www.necdisplay.com/supportcenter/mo...ectraview2/faq/

QUESTION: I’m using two different displays and calibrating both to the same target, however the white points do not match exactly. What can I do to improve this?

ANSWER: This issue can be caused by the different spectral outputs of the two displays causing the human eye to see color differences differently than the color sensor used to calibrate the displays. In this case the numerical measurements from the color sensor are identical on both displays, but they do not visually match. Manually visually matching one display to another can usually avoid this issue. The basic steps to take are as follows:

   1. Calibrate both displays.

   2. Pick one of the displays to be a reference. Call this display #1.

   3. Select display #2 in SpectraView and open the Custom White Point dialog. Use the Visual Match tool to adjust the white color so it visually matches white shown on display #1.

   4. When a visual match is achieved, put the sensor over the measurement area and click Measure. This will enter the value that the sensor perceives into the White Point. Save this as a new Target.

   5. Recalibrate display #2 with this new Target. From now on always use the respective Target to calibrate each display.


QUESTION: I'm using the Safari web browser, which is supposed to be color managed, however some images appear overly saturated on my wide color gamut display, while others appear normal. What is wrong?

ANSWER: Safari assumes that all images that do not have an embedded ICC profile are unmanaged and are not color managed. Only images that have an ICC profile are corrected. Be sure to embed an ICC profile in each image file if you want to make sure it will appear correctly on Safari, even if the image colorspace is sRGB.



QUESTION: I'm using dual displays, one of which is a wide color gamut. My web browser is color managed, however when I move a browser window to the wide color gamut display, colors are oversaturated. What is going on?

ANSWER: Currently all web browsers that are color managed (e.g. Safari and Firefox 3 [with the color management option enabled]) only use the ICC/ColorSync profile for the primary display for color correction. This means that even if a browser window is moved to the secondary display, it is still (incorrectly) using the color correction for the primary display.

Also Safari assumes that all images that do not have an embedded ICC profile are unmanaged and are not color corrected. Only images that have an ICC profile are corrected. Firefox 3 correctly assumes that all images that do not have an embedded ICC profile are in sRGB colorspace.


Quote from: NateTwedten
I gave it another chance yesterday.

The Uniformity Mode helped, but there was still a noticable difference across the screen no matter what level I put it at. No matter how much manual RGB value calibration I did, I could still not get the colors to look normal. Reds were all tweaked out (mega saturated) and there was still that strange magenta look to the whites. I had to bring the luminance down to 90 to even make the brightness bearable. I still had a headache at the end of the day. The blacks were pretty washed out too.

We're definitely going to return this thing.
Logged

Will Hollingworth
Senior Manager, Product Development
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9191



WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2009, 12:13:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: WillH
QUESTION: I'm using the Safari web browser, which is supposed to be color managed, however some images appear overly saturated on my wide color gamut display, while others appear normal. What is wrong?

ANSWER: Safari assumes that all images that do not have an embedded ICC profile are unmanaged and are not color managed. Only images that have an ICC profile are corrected. Be sure to embed an ICC profile in each image file if you want to make sure it will appear correctly on Safari, even if the image colorspace is sRGB.

Thought it assumed the display profile for untagged images (silly). Not sure in Snow Leopard if this has changed to sRGB. And then there’s the issue with older versions of Flash...
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2009, 12:26:26 PM »
ReplyReply

No, I was going to use it as a primary display. The large size would eliminate any need for two monitors, which is annoying. We have another computer next to this one with an Apple 20" on it. Fresh calibrations on both the Apple and the NEC weren't even close to the same.

Ultimately, whether this monitor can be made to work eventually or not, it is not worth the hassle. We have already purchased $1000+ calibration equipment that works great for everything else. I'd rather get a less wide-gamut display that works without so much research and "extra" costs. We're wasting $80 in shipping by returning this thing... I dislike it that much.

I just wish the 23" Apple was still sold. Lacie 324s are out of stock in town... not sure what else to get.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2009, 01:18:45 PM by NateTwedten » Logged
Czornyj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1422



WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2009, 01:52:43 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: NateTwedten
No, I was going to use it as a primary display. The large size would eliminate any need for two monitors, which is annoying. We have another computer next to this one with an Apple 20" on it. Fresh calibrations on both the Apple and the NEC weren't even close to the same.

Ultimately, whether this monitor can be made to work eventually or not, it is not worth the hassle. We have already purchased $1000+ calibration equipment that works great for everything else. I'd rather get a less wide-gamut display that works without so much research and "extra" costs. We're wasting $80 in shipping by returning this thing... I dislike it that much.

I just wish the 23" Apple was still sold. Lacie 324s are out of stock in town... not sure what else to get.

NEC 2490WUXi2 is a normal gamut panel. So is the Apple 24", but it is LED backlit so you'll also get a different look again. It's not easy to match display white points without proper software.
Logged

NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2009, 02:04:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Czornyj
NEC 2490WUXi2 is a normal gamut panel. So is the Apple 24", but it is LED backlit so you'll also get a different look again. It's not easy to match display white points without proper software.

Part of what angers me is that i1 Pro is not enough.

Apple 24" is a definite no. I refuse to buy anything with a glossy screen.
Logged
madmanchan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2110


« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2009, 03:47:46 PM »
ReplyReply

I had the same issue recently with the 2690WUXi2. I used SpectraView II, latest public build on Mac OS 10.5.8. Same color cast and uniformity issues as described above, even with the ColorComp on at various settings. The at-an-angle viewing is also significantly worse compared to the original 2690WUXi, which I also have. I was unable to find a workable solution, other than to return it and get a (refurbished) 2690WUXi.
Logged

Czornyj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1422



WWW
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2009, 03:50:54 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: NateTwedten
Part of what angers me is that i1 Pro is not enough.

Apple 24" is a definite no. I refuse to buy anything with a glossy screen.

The wide gamut panel has different fluorescent tubes, so I'm not sure if you'll be able to get the perfect match anyway.

NEC 2490WUXi2 is one of the last normal gamut panoramic panels, LaCie is also a wide gamut display. There was an Eizo S2431W, but it was replaced by wide gamut S2432W and S2433W. I think the 2490WUXi2 is the panel that's most similar to ACD on the market.
Logged

NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2009, 04:13:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Czornyj
The wide gamut panel has different fluorescent tubes, so I'm not sure if you'll be able to get the perfect match anyway.

NEC 2490WUXi2 is one of the last normal gamut panoramic panels, LaCie is also a wide gamut display. There was an Eizo S2431W, but it was replaced by wide gamut S2432W and S2433W. I think the 2490WUXi2 is the panel that's most similar to ACD on the market.

This NEC is really nothing like the Apple 20". It looks a lot more like my cheap Samsung than the Apple. The 23"/30" I don't know about because I've never used them.
Logged
NateTwedten
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2009, 05:26:42 PM »
ReplyReply

I went and took a look at a well calibrated Eizo CG241W. I thought the colors were all wacked out on that too. DO NOT LIKE. Maybe it's accurate, but it looks horrible.
Logged
evonzz
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 79


« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2009, 07:45:50 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: NateTwedten
I went and took a look at a well calibrated Eizo CG241W. I thought the colors were all wacked out on that too. DO NOT LIKE. Maybe it's accurate, but it looks horrible.

Nate - how is your monitor now?  did you get it working ok, and how?

We just purchased one for our studios and are getting all the symptoms you described in the initial post above.  Fringing, color casts, and the lot.
Currently we have an i1Display2 using colormatch software.  We are in China and looking into how to get the Spectraview software.

Keen to hear some reports of overcoming initial disappointment and problems.

Cheers
RE
Logged

www.centralstudios.cn
- a large shooting space in Central Shanghai

Phase One P40+/P65+/IQ180
and lots of other stuff
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad