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Author Topic: Big Breakfasts when the weather is bad  (Read 4807 times)
Murph
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« on: October 09, 2009, 08:44:36 AM »
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Raining like heck here, was going to go photograph on my day off, but instead decided to make me a big breakfast.  I'd rather have a huge breakfast and eat light for the rest of the day, than the other way around.

If I am making it myself:

Corned Beef Hash w/ homefries and grits OR SOS over Hashbrowns and grits OR Chorizo Fino and hashbrowns in tortillas. I must say that my old Mess Hall in the army (2/36th Infantry/3rd Armored Division) had about the best SOS I have ever eaten. On a cold day in Germany, SOS. hash browns, and grits with coffee was a meal from heaven.  Swanson's makes an acceptable SOS in the frozen food section, which goes well over fried potatoes.

If I am going out to say... The Blanco Cafe in San Antonio then its: Chorizo and potato tacos with the occasional barbacoa taco.  

So what is/are your favorite big breakfast
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Justan
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« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2009, 10:13:31 AM »
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I used to love what I call a triple bypass breakfast: 2 or 3 eggs over medium, a hand formed hamburger patty, a big stack of hashbrowns with a liberal dose of tobacco over everything, and rye toast.

8 years ago I learned I have CAD so switched to sliced chicken or turkey on a bagel with tomatoes and some spices.

We should do a friendly LL competition of favorite food fotos.
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bill t.
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« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2009, 11:01:52 AM »
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French toast (aka croque monsieur) with honey on a fall morning just chilly enough to make it seem right.  Only slightly less bypass-inducing than SOS which BTW brought back some memories.

Maybe this weekend some New Mexico style Huevos Mexicanos as in this pic borrowed from Ghara...

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JeffKohn
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« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2009, 12:33:52 PM »
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Quote
I used to love what I call a triple bypass breakfast: 2 or 3 eggs over medium, a hand formed hamburger patty, a big stack of hashbrowns with a liberal dose of tobacco over everything, and rye toast.
Tobacco, or Tabasco?
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kikashi
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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2009, 01:50:40 PM »
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Can someone tell an ignorant Englishman what SOS is?

And why don't you people include baked beans and devilled mushrooms? You're missing some of the best things in life.

Jeremy
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Justan
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« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2009, 02:37:13 PM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
Tobacco, or Tabasco?


LOL

Tabasco

Clearly I need to wear my glasses when running spelling check! This is a reminder that a 20” monitor is no longer enough!    

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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2009, 03:00:07 PM »
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I miss smoking.

Sadly, a big breakfast is when I eat at McDonalds.
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awolfe
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2009, 04:11:51 PM »
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kikashi -

SOS -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chipped_beef

it explains the acronym in the article



My favorite big breakfast is either a huge quantity of coffee with oatmeal and maple syrup,
or scrambled eggs with about 4 eggs, chorizo, peppers, onions, shallots, hot sauce, fresh black pepper with a side of tater tots!!
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David Sutton
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2009, 07:39:49 PM »
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Californian grapefruit followed by leftover rice stir fried in olive oil with finely chopped smoked pork belly, spring onions, egg, ginger and Bambi's mother (venison salami) and whatever is at hand. Extra large pot of Earl Grey/single origin Ceylon blend sweetened with wild thyme honey.
David
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Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2009, 10:02:38 PM »
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Quote from: Murph
So what is/are your favorite big breakfast

Giant pot of coffee.
Huge stack of french toast made with gritty wheat bread, straight eggs (no milk) and a touch of nutmeg, drowned in real maple syrup.
Alternative: pancakes from whole wheat flour with ground cashews in the batter.
Plus a small mound of link sausage.

After that it's time for a nap. Maximum dose of Lipitor is optional.
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2009, 03:34:03 AM »
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 This is all very nice until you have an ulcer, and I have now given up fried breakfasts and coffee.
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Kevin Gallagher
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2009, 06:35:19 AM »
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Lots of great sounding combos here, my go to is french toast topped with cinnamon butter and a couple of little heartstoppers my wife calls "Scotch Eggs" You take a shelled, hard boiled egg and wrap it in breakfast sausage, roll in breadcrumbs and deep fry
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Sheldon N
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2009, 12:10:39 PM »
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Love shooting and a big breakfast! This was on Thursday... shot sunrise, then an enormous plate of biscuits and gravy and eggs and sausage. I most definitely did NOT have lunch that day.  

[attachment=17110:Sparks_Lake.jpg]

[attachment=17111:_32O7697.jpg]
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2009, 02:26:37 PM »
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Wow! Those anglo-saxon breakfasts took two frenchman's eyes out of their orbits.  

Now that I put them back where they ordinary belong, I just will add a little technical precision : in France a croque-monsieur is a cheese-and-ham sandwich, toasted in the oven - scrambled eggs with cream are optional ; add on top an egg kept whole as in bacon&eggs, it is called a croque-madame. Voyez plutôt.
So, even for Americans or Canadians  it wouldn't be wise to dip one in honey or maple syrup.

That said, now for the 64.000$ question : why do we French people seldom eat salted things at breakfast?
- the immediate answer is that sweet meals pass better with coffee. French salted meals would ask for wine. And yes, we're talking about breakfast.
- another one that may apply at least to me, is that in France salted meals have generally more complex flavors than sweet ones, complex flavors which I'm not able to fully appreciate before being fully awake (means not before noon for me    , I'm definitely a sunset photographer more than a sunrise one, and am glad to live on the west side of the Alps).

So, rather a pint of black coffee and a mountain of viennoiseries for me, please. With a gun on my head, I'll have a soft-boiled egg with that.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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bill t.
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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2009, 03:04:01 PM »
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Quote from: NikoJorj
Now that I put them back where they ordinary belong, I just will add a little technical precision : in France a croque-monsieur is a cheese-and-ham sandwich, toasted in the oven - scrambled eggs with cream are optional ; add on top an egg kept whole as in bacon&eggs, it is called a croque-madame. Voyez plutôt.
So, even for Americans or Canadians  it wouldn't be wise to dip one in honey or maple syrup.
That wouldn't stop most of the people who have posted on this topic!  And of course those Canadians will eat just about anything.  
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Derry
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« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2009, 10:28:25 AM »
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gotta say that SOS I had when serving on board the DD710 (USS Gearing) was first class,, have never found any over the counter that is close,,

always liked it when the weather was blowing as so many would never eat in the chow hall and then fools like me could just load up on all we could hold,,

Derry
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k bennett
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« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2009, 08:03:43 AM »
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I must say I make pretty good cornmeal pancakes with blueberries and maple syrup, from scratch, as they say. Add several rashers of bacon or some good local pork sausage, a large pot of fresh coffee, and life is good.

The pancakes are even better when I use the wild blueberries we pick in late summer in the mountains of Virginia. They freeze very well, and make a nice treat come February. Sadly, we didn't get a chance to do our annual Blueberry Hike this year. Too much work to do.
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ashley
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« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2009, 09:44:01 AM »
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Quote from: k bennett
I must say I make pretty good cornmeal pancakes with blueberries and maple syrup, from scratch, as they say. Add several rashers of bacon or some good local pork sausage, a large pot of fresh coffee, and life is good.

The pancakes are even better when I use the wild blueberries we pick in late summer in the mountains of Virginia. They freeze very well, and make a nice treat come February. Sadly, we didn't get a chance to do our annual Blueberry Hike this year. Too much work to do.


It looks like most of you are eating a lot better than I am, since a standard breakfast for me is a bowl of porridge, perhaps a handful of walnuts and a cup of nettle tea with no added sugar.
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2009, 10:39:13 AM »
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Quote from: Dick Roadnight
This is all very nice until you have an ulcer, and I have now given up fried breakfasts and coffee.
Update ... I now have Jaundice, and I conclude that this is directly caused by a "good diet"...

When you eat a fatty meal, like a "good breakfast", your gall bladder produces bile, and gives you a mini-gall-flush, removing gall stones.

I have not had a cooked breakfast for months, resulting in gall stones, which block the bile duct and cause obstructive jaundice.

At least I now know what is wrong with me (Big Breakfast deficit) and can take steps to fix it.
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Rob C
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« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2009, 01:52:01 PM »
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Dick, I think I'd stick with the frugal life; ain't much fun having a heart event - even less two - so stay off the animal fats and try for a single glass of Cabernet Sauvignon per day. Or so I am instructed. Coffee is supposed to be on a limit of a single cup per day, but I cheat (myself) and have around three of them.

Living in Scotland, at a time when health problems were for other people, a big breakfast was the thing that followed a Sunday morning's swim at the local pool. It consisted of eggs, bacon, perhaps a small sausage, soda-scones, black pudding, some mushrooms for good measure and possibly some beans if it was a cold day. The idea of syrup on food other than a sweet sounds very - well - unusual for Scottish tastes, which, oddly enough, only surfaced on Sundays. The rest of the week we were as Mediterranean as you could get when by the Atlantic.

French breakfasts. I suppose it depends if you mean chez nous or hotel. I can't imagine anything more Spartan than sitting on a hard seat at a marble-topped table having coffee, a slice of dry cake and some bread rolls. But French dinners, on the other hand, in the same logis, were Heaven now. Hard to believe you were in the same establishments. I think there is a practical reason for this: produce a good breakfast and who is going to go to work?  At the very least you would have to er - thank the wife (if chez nous)!

Rob C
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