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Author Topic: Big Breakfasts when the weather is bad  (Read 4683 times)
Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2009, 02:05:40 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Dick, I think I'd stick with the frugal life; ain't much fun having a heart event - even less two - so stay off the animal fats and try for a single glass of Cabernet Sauvignon per day. Or so I am instructed. Coffee is supposed to be on a limit of a single cup per day, but I cheat (myself) and have around three of them.

Living in Scotland, at a time when health problems were for other people, a big breakfast was the thing that followed a Sunday morning's swim at the local pool. It consisted of eggs, bacon, perhaps a small sausage, soda-scones, black pudding, some mushrooms for good measure and possibly some beans if it was a cold day. The idea of syrup on food other than a sweet sounds very - well - unusual for Scottish tastes, which, oddly enough, only surfaced on Sundays. The rest of the week we were as Mediterranean as you could get when by the Atlantic.

French breakfasts. I suppose it depends if you mean chez nous or hotel. I can't imagine anything more Spartan than sitting on a hard seat at a marble-topped table having coffee, a slice of dry cake and some bread rolls. But French dinners, on the other hand, in the same logis, were Heaven now. Hard to believe you were in the same establishments. I think there is a practical reason for this: produce a good breakfast and who is going to go to work?  At the very least you would have to er - thank the wife (if chez nous)!

Rob C
Hi, Rob... I did not know that you were on the right side of the pond.

I have given up coffee, but look forward to an occasional latte

I have always been tea-total, and have given up bread, cakes, oats etc as I am allergic to gluten.

I wonder what proportion of the members here have heard of black pudding - or browse!
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bill t.
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« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2009, 04:51:21 PM »
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Quote from: Dick Roadnight
I wonder what proportion of the members here have heard of black pudding - or browse!
Kidney pie is as far as I'll go in the culinary barrel scraping direction.

Behold Black Pudding as we find it.  You rarely see it this red, and no that's not berry juice...

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Josh-H
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« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2009, 04:56:17 PM »
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Quote from: bill t.
Kidney pie is as far as I'll go in the culinary barrel scraping direction.

Behold Black Pudding as we find it.  You rarely see it this red, and no that's not berry juice...

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NikoJorj
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« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2009, 02:43:39 AM »
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Quote from: Dick Roadnight
I wonder what proportion of the members here have heard of black pudding - or browse!
Here in France it's called Boudin, and the more traditionnal way to eat it is with onions and/or apples (cooked in the pan with it) and rice... Perhaps less fat and other ingredients than in the UK version, and definitely not a breakfast meal, as said.  

Dates back from Antiquity, says wikipedia [fr].
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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papa v2.0
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« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2009, 03:01:48 AM »
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mmmm a full scottish breakfast

fried eggs, steak sausages, (or lorne sausage),  bacon rashers, haggis pudding, Stornoway black pudding, tattie scones, fried mushrooms, and of course Heinz baked beanz, accompanied with toast and jam and washed down with a cup of coffee.


black pudding

if you want to try some
http://www.charlesmacleod.co.uk/index1.htm

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