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Author Topic: Panoramic stitched shots  (Read 9798 times)
chex
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« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2009, 07:16:51 PM »
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Safari Njema Ed!

edit: I see youve been already, hope it was awesome.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2009, 07:19:15 PM by chex » Logged
Ed Blagden
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« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2009, 01:13:30 AM »
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Quote from: chex
Safari Njema Ed!

edit: I see youve been already, hope it was awesome.

Thanks, and yes it was awesome.  You may know the area: go on Magadi Road past Kiserian, turn left at Corner Baridi, go along Champagne Ridge about 5km and you're there.  The place was just next door to Richard Leakey's house.  Amazing that we can still find places like this less than 1 hours drive from Nairobi.

Am I making you homesick?

Ed
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chex
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« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2009, 03:44:17 PM »
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you're abolutely *killing* me haha

I used to watch the rally at corner baridi when I was a kid, beautiful country down that way.
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2009, 01:40:29 AM »
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Nicely done!

Mike.
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bill t.
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« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2009, 01:12:40 PM »
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When shooting panos in rapidly changing light levels light like the minutes around sunset, best approach is to shoot from darkest side to brightest side.  That sometimes buys you enough time to bracket, by the time you get to the bright side it will be down quite a bit and more in balance with the earlier dark side.
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Wim van Velzen
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« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2009, 01:46:57 PM »
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This year I have really done a lot of panos, esp. during a visit to Orkney (a group of isles in the North of Scotland). Those islands are quite flat, so pano works well.

One often reoccuring problem though, is when photographing scenes with waves. You often cannot get a believable line of waves, cf the example

details: Rollei and 50mm lens (lots of overlap in the shots), CS3 photomerge.

Any solutions?
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Wim van Velzen
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« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2009, 01:49:39 PM »
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BTW, vertical stitching makes me return to the square, I used a lot in the film days. No wave problems here:

(sorry for the dust visible, images still not ready for publishing...)
« Last Edit: October 28, 2009, 01:51:14 PM by Wim van Velzen » Logged

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Panopeeper
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« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2009, 02:27:07 PM »
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Quote from: Wim van Velzen
One often reoccuring problem though, is when photographing scenes with waves. You often cannot get a believable line of waves, cf the example
1. I see stitching error in the example; that needs to be corrected before the waves.

2. Your example is not a really bad case; it can be much worse.

Anyway, one has to use a product, which allows for manual intervention between warping and blending (PTAssembler, PTGui, Hugin). The "stitcher"does not create a pano but warps the individual sources, which will be blended together by a special program, like Enblend and Smartblend. Both processes can be performed, and the tangible areas repaired afterwards through overlaying by corrections created from the output of the warping process.

One possible solution is to cut a region over the seam from the overlapping warped frames and making a masked transition between them, usually from left to right. The problem is, that the result will be muddy; if the waves were clear, this is very noticable.

The other solution is the zig-zagging; much more labour. The result can be excellent, though it does not always work. The condition is, that the overlapping frames' darkness must match - but that should always be so (I never let the stitcher adjust the darkness). Larger but very regular waves can not be repaired this way.

1. The initial state, after blending:



2. One of the two adjacent warped, unblended frames is copied over the other, with 50% opacity to show the overlapping areas:



3. Most of the overlapping water surface is selected (here with polygonal lasso), the selection inverted and deleted from both layers (the background layer has to be copied for this). The opacity of the top layer can be restored now. (I named the two layers "LeftSide" respectively "RightSide", in order to avoid mixing them up.):



4. Now, the zig-zag selection: start in one corner, go accross close to the other edge, and back, of course somewhat lower (if started in the upper corner):



The starting point dictates, from which layer what has to be kept. I started at the left edge; I delete the selection from the right side frame and keep the selection from the left side frame (by inverting the selection and deleting it).

The selection from the left side frame is narrowing towards the right, the selection from the right side frame is narrowing towards the left.

The resulting layers are:





5. The right side needs to be cleaned up a bit:



6. and the image flattened (for convenience I selected both layers before flattening):



7. Now this selection will be copied over the blended pano, aligned and merged; that's easy.

Here is the final pano (after having repeated this process for most of the seams; one of them is not repaired):



(The horizontally posterization of the sky is due to the downsized graduation; the original sky was ugly, homogenous gray, I replaced it. There is no posterization in the full size.)
« Last Edit: October 28, 2009, 02:29:28 PM by Panopeeper » Logged

Gabor
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« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2009, 02:49:07 PM »
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Wow.  Superb tutorial, Panopeeper!  That's an excellent solution to a very difficult problem.  Thanks!

Peter
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Wim van Velzen
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« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2009, 12:06:21 PM »
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Thanks a lot - seems to be a lot of work, but worth it. IŽll try it on some of the problem panos!
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Panopeeper
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« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2009, 12:28:46 PM »
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The thanks belong to someone on the Panorama Tools Assembler forum, which is dedicated to panorama creation, excellent on every level. I learned the zig-zagging for several years ago there, I forgot who posted it. My contribution is only the tutorial, not the idea.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 12:29:45 PM by Panopeeper » Logged

Gabor
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