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Author Topic: Printing "sand" from Mesquite Dunes (Death Valley)  (Read 7967 times)
bellimages
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« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2009, 04:01:37 PM »
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Quote from: Justan
Try the high pass filter, which has produced *great* results for me and is controllable in the extreme. The use isn't quite obvious but here is a guide:

On the Layer palette select your Background Layer and right click. Select Duplicate Layer.

With this new layer highlighted select Filter / Other / High Pass. Set the Radius to 10 and click OK.
Zoom into your image to Actual Pixels level so you can better see what you're going to do next.
Go back to the Layer Palette and select Hard Light from the left drop down.
Now go to the Opacity Slider and select a level of sharpening that seems best to you. Usually something between 20% and 70% will be best.


You can also play with the radius for a wide degree of granularity.

I found the guide above here: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial...harpening.shtml
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 04:08:36 PM by bellimages » Logged

Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
bellimages
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« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2009, 04:06:05 PM »
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On the Layer palette select your Background Layer and right click. Select Duplicate Layer.

With this new layer highlighted select Filter / Other / High Pass. Set the Radius to 10 and click OK.
Zoom into your image to Actual Pixels level so you can better see what you're going to do next.
Go back to the Layer Palette and select Hard Light from the left drop down.
Now go to the Opacity Slider and select a level of sharpening that seems best to you. Usually something between 20% and 70% will be best. [/i]

You can also play with the radius for a wide degree of granularity.

I found the guide above here: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial...harpening.shtml[/quote]


This brings up an unrelated question (PLEASE don't stop the discussion of the original topic). This technique suggests that you zoom into the actual pixel level. In CS4, Photoshop adds something that looks like a "grid" over the pixels. I find this grid very distracting. I'm sure that there is a way to turn this off, but I haven't found it as of yet.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 04:09:05 PM by bellimages » Logged

Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2009, 04:08:42 PM »
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Quote from: bellimages
This brings up an unrelated question (PLEASE don't stop the discussion of the original topic). This technique suggests that you zoom into the actual pixel level. In CS4, Photoshop adds something that looks like a "grid" over the pixels. I find this grid very distracting. I'm sure that there is a way to turn this off, but I haven't found it as of yet.
Are you talking 100% 'pixel for pixel' view?  Can you post a screen capture?
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bellimages
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« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2009, 04:11:28 PM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
Are you talking 100% 'pixel for pixel' view?  Can you post a screen capture?


Here is an example:
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 04:11:49 PM by bellimages » Logged

Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
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"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
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« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2009, 04:18:13 PM »
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Quote from: Justan
Try the high pass filter, which has produced *great* results for me and is controllable in the extreme. The use isn't quite obvious but here is a guide:

On the Layer palette select your Background Layer and right click. Select Duplicate Layer.

With this new layer highlighted select Filter / Other / High Pass. Set the Radius to 10 and click OK.
Zoom into your image to Actual Pixels level so you can better see what you're going to do next.
Go back to the Layer Palette and select Hard Light from the left drop down.
Now go to the Opacity Slider and select a level of sharpening that seems best to you. Usually something between 20% and 70% will be best.


You can also play with the radius for a wide degree of granularity.

I found the guide above here: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial...harpening.shtml


I just placed this post, but it seems to be gone. So without further ado, here it is again:

When I use Photoshop CS4 to zoom in tight (to see actual pixels), I see something that looks like a "grid" around each pixel. I'd like to turn off this function, but have not found a place to do so. Can anyone advise.

Attached is a sample, zoomed in very tight.
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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2009, 04:22:59 PM »
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Quote from: bellimages
Attached is a sample, zoomed in very tight.
That's quite a bit past 100% ... you don't need to zoom in that far ... set the zoom to 100% and see how that looks ... that's the primary view for capture and creative sharpening adjustments.
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bellimages
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« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2009, 10:05:48 PM »
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Quote from: Justan
Try the high pass filter, which has produced *great* results for me and is controllable in the extreme. The use isn't quite obvious but here is a guide:

On the Layer palette select your Background Layer and right click. Select Duplicate Layer.

With this new layer highlighted select Filter / Other / High Pass. Set the Radius to 10 and click OK.
Zoom into your image to Actual Pixels level so you can better see what you're going to do next.
Go back to the Layer Palette and select Hard Light from the left drop down.
Now go to the Opacity Slider and select a level of sharpening that seems best to you. Usually something between 20% and 70% will be best.


You can also play with the radius for a wide degree of granularity.

I found the guide above here: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial...harpening.shtml

Not sure if this post will show up in addition to the two that I posted earlier today from work. If so, sorry.

You mention zooming into actual pixels, and that brings up an unrelated topic (please keep the main topic going). When I zoom into pixels, Photoshop seems to show a "grid" around each pixel. I find that very annoying. Is there a way to turn off that function? See attachement
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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
Griffin Friedman
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« Reply #27 on: November 19, 2009, 10:41:43 PM »
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Quote from: bellimages
Not sure if this post will show up in addition to the two that I posted earlier today from work. If so, sorry.

You mention zooming into actual pixels, and that brings up an unrelated topic (please keep the main topic going). When I zoom into pixels, Photoshop seems to show a "grid" around each pixel. I find that very annoying. Is there a way to turn off that function? See attachement

You can turn off the grid by going to view - show and unchecking the pixel grid option.
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jfwfoto
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« Reply #28 on: November 22, 2009, 06:59:29 PM »
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I would suggest trying Focus Fixer in this situation. It is a deconvolution sharpener that I have found to be very effective in resolving detail from a soft image.
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