What do you call your Fine Art Inkjet Prints?

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Dave Gurtcheff:
I went to a local museum, and saw a wonderful Photo Exhibit of B&W prints by a single photographer. Flush mounted uncropped traditional prints of all sizes (some from 35mm that were probably 20"x30"). Print quality was superb. Next to each print was the title, and "Silver Gelatin Print". I told my friends that was the "new word" for good old fashioned darkroom prints, that many of us made. I had a fully equipped darkroom for 50 years, and sold and exhibited  my traditional prints (both B&W and "C" prints). I have an opportunity to have an exhibit as well in the same museum. Apparently the Artist must specify the medium ("Oils on Canvas", "Silver Gelatin Print". etc). What do we call this new medium? "Digital Pigment Print"?? "Giclee Pigment Print", "Inkjet on Baryatta" (spelling?). I know there is possibly a snob appeal that would disfavor an ink jet print, but that aside, what have you called your work when faced with an important exhibit?
Thanks in advance      
Dave Gurtcheff
www.modernpictorials.com

JonasYip:
I've been using "Archival Pigment Print"

Scott Martin:
Print specification has historically conformed to one of the following two naming conventions:

Example #1

[process] [media]

silver gelatin fiber base print

Example #2

[process] print on [media]

silver gelatin print on fiber base paper

If we continue to use these conventions for pigmented inkjet prints we might have:

Example #1


[process] [media]

pigment fiber base print

Example #2

[process] print on [media]

pigment print on fiber base paper

Some more well specified examples:

Pigment print on cotton rag paper
Warm toned pigment print on cotton rag paper
Coated pigment print on canvas
Silver gelatin digital print on metallic paper

"Archival Inkjet Print" has been a pretty decent term that seen a lot of good use throughout the last decade. While it's good enough for most usage, curators and collectors like to point out that they want to know more, like what type of paper was used and whither or not it is coated. While "archival" was reassuring 10 years ago it's practically a given today. Terms like "photo", "fine art" and "digital" are not very specific and could mean a variety of things. One exception to this is the "digital silver gelatin print" (made from a durst, Lightjet, Noritsu, etc) that is sometimes nice to distinguish from an optical silver gelatin print made directly from a film original.

Geoff Wittig:
Quote from: Dave Gurtcheff

I went to a local museum, and saw a wonderful Photo Exhibit of B&W prints by a single photographer. Flush mounted uncropped traditional prints of all sizes (some from 35mm that were probably 20"x30"). Print quality was superb. Next to each print was the title, and "Silver Gelatin Print". I told my friends that was the "new word" for good old fashioned darkroom prints, that many of us made. I had a fully equipped darkroom for 50 years, and sold and exhibited  my traditional prints (both B&W and "C" prints). I have an opportunity to have an exhibit as well in the same museum. Apparently the Artist must specify the medium ("Oils on Canvas", "Silver Gelatin Print". etc). What do we call this new medium? "Digital Pigment Print"?? "Giclee Pigment Print", "Inkjet on Baryatta" (spelling?). I know there is possibly a snob appeal that would disfavor an ink jet print, but that aside, what have you called your work when faced with an important exhibit?
Thanks in advance      
Dave Gurtcheff
www.modernpictorials.com

I like "pigment ink print on 100% cotton rag paper" (if that's what you're printing on). It's accurate and upscale without being too pretentious. For an exhibit this can be accompanied by an artist's statement describing the inkset and paper used, with estimates of longevity and glowing description of the æsthetic and archival virtues of such prints compared to earlier forms of photographic color prints. It's entirely appropriate to indicate the much greater expected longevity and controllability of inkjet prints over C-prints, Cibachrome/Ilfochrome—better longevity than even dye transfer prints if they're displayed rather than stored in the dark. This can go a long way toward defusing anti-digital snobbery.

Just my 2¢, but "giclee" will probably turn off more folks than it will impress.

Colorwave:
Unfortunately, I'm stuck with the term giclee in my market here in Hawaii for about 90% of the clients I print for.  Some galleries are starting to veer away from the word a little, but it seems to resonate with the more democratic end of the art buying market, vs. collectors.  I print for someone who exhibits at an exclusive gallery in San Francisco, though, that has my inkjet prints labeled as chromagenic prints.  It sounds nice, but is deceptive.  He is one of the last people I know that still shoots film, but the connection is tenuous at best, as what the client walks away with is an archival inkjet print.  The fact that there was a little silver in the process upstream seems largely irrelevant to me in terms of the label on the print.  I prefer to call my personal work "archival pigment print on (paper name)".

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