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Author Topic: How do you take the curl out of roll stock prints?  (Read 3832 times)
jasdown
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« on: November 18, 2009, 03:19:52 AM »
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I wish to thank the forum members (especially the inestimable advice of Ernst Dinkla and Geoff Wittig!), for assisting this newbie in his Z3200 odyssey. My latest dilemma is, what practical methods are there to removing the curl in roll stock prints when the client demands a quick (i.e., same or next day) turnaround? I am currently using a roll of HP Satin Pro, and when I print 16x20's in landscape mode for optimum paper usage the prints have a very tight and stubborn curl.  Is it OK to reverse-roll a print within the first hour?

Thanks once more for your advice.
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2009, 04:02:22 AM »
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Quote from: jasdown
My latest dilemma is, what practical methods are there to removing the curl in roll stock prints when the client demands a quick (i.e., same or next day) turnaround? I am currently using a roll of HP Satin Pro, and when I print 16x20's in landscape mode for optimum paper usage the prints have a very tight and stubborn curl.  Is it OK to reverse-roll a print within the first hour?

Thanks once more for your advice.


I have used different sized carton core rollers to take out the curl. Attach a sheet of strong paper (kraft 150 grams for example) to the core with tape at two sides of the sheet so no glue at the joint is exposed. The cross cut of that tool should look like a Q with a very long tail. Slip the print in between the sheet and the core and roll it against the curl. I use different core dimensions as some papers can not be decurled on the smallest ones (2") without cracking the inkjet coating. In that case time is your friend. For long print runs I often have a 6 inch core on a roller bar at the floor and reverse wind the total printed roll directly on that one to leave it for 12 hours on the roll before cutting the sheets. I've used the DIY tools for more than a decade. Later on a commercial one appeared. I have never used that one.

BTW It is strange that the Canon iPF9000 roll winder only goes one direction where it could do a similar job by going the other direction too. Not my complaint but that of a friend.



met vriendelijke groeten, Ernst Dinkla

Dinkla Gallery Canvas Wrap Actions for Photoshop
http://www.pigment-print.com/dinklacanvaswraps/index.html
« Last Edit: November 18, 2009, 04:07:57 AM by Ernst Dinkla » Logged
jasdown
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2009, 05:29:55 AM »
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Quote from: Ernst Dinkla
I have used different sized carton core rollers to take out the curl. Attach a sheet of strong paper (kraft 150 grams for example) to the core with tape at two sides of the sheet so no glue at the joint is exposed. The cross cut of that tool should look like a Q with a very long tail. Slip the print in between the sheet and the core and roll it against the curl. I use different core dimensions as some papers can not be decurled on the smallest ones (2") without cracking the inkjet coating. In that case time is your friend. For long print runs I often have a 6 inch core on a roller bar at the floor and reverse wind the total printed roll directly on that one to leave it for 12 hours on the roll before cutting the sheets. I've used the DIY tools for more than a decade. Later on a commercial one appeared. I have never used that one.

Once more I am indebted to your great advice. Thank you, Ernst!
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2009, 07:10:18 AM »
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You can try this, it's pricey but it works.

http://www.d-roller.com/flashintro.htm

http://luminous-landscape.com/video_journa...16/Deroller.mp4

If you want to buy one,

http://www.shadesofpaper.com/product_info....products_id=114
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jasdown
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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2009, 07:27:22 AM »
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Quote from: Gemmtech

Wow, the video demo was amazing! Is there something about the composition of the film in this product that affects such a quick decurl?
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StuartOnline
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2009, 07:33:42 AM »
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I also use the D-roller (24" model).
It is pricey but it does work great.
Also I purchased this from Shades of Paper after watching one of Michael's videos a while back.
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2009, 08:16:27 AM »
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Quote from: jasdown
Wow, the video demo was amazing! Is there something about the composition of the film in this product that affects such a quick decurl?


I assume it's just the weight.  It is one of those ridiculously simple devices that just simply works!  If somebody is paying a couple thousand for a printer and lots more for paper and ink then this item and a Rotatrim cutter seem cheap to me.

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Dave Carter
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2009, 08:40:49 AM »
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jasdown,
The above notes are great advice.
One added note is that I often do it before I print on cut pieces of paper from a roll.  That takes most of the curl out first.
I use my own heavy plastic sheet (boat window glass used on canvas tops) on cardboard rolls of several diameters.
Most of the time my paper will sit in the roll for hours before use.
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neile
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2009, 09:40:29 AM »
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There are lots of prior threads about this topic in the forum, just search for "de-curl" or "D-roller" and you'll find many options that are far less expensive than the D-Roller. I personally just use a roll of kraft paper. Works great!

Neil
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Neil Enns
Dane Creek Folio Covers. Limited edition Tuscan Sun and Citron covers are now in stock!
Gemmtech
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2009, 07:06:11 PM »
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Quote from: kaelaria

It even does a magic trick of moving the image from the far side to the near side!  
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