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Author Topic: ACR start up very slow.  (Read 3408 times)
Bill Koenig
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« on: December 07, 2009, 12:29:33 PM »
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I have PS CS3, after I open ACR, its unresponsive for about 60 to 90 seconds, then it slowly comes to life and then works normally. Any ideas as to what's slowing it down?
BTW, I have a fast PC with 4 GB of ram.
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Bill Koenig,
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2009, 11:14:32 AM »
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Is there a lot of disk activity while it's unresponsive? What are your swap/scratch/memory settings?
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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2009, 12:30:09 PM »
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Quote from: Jonathan Wienke
Is there a lot of disk activity while it's unresponsive? What are your swap/scratch/memory settings?

Hi Jonathan,
I'm not sure if this what your asking about, but here goes.
In PS ram is set to 70%, the scratch drive is my third internal drive and is a 80 GB SATA II, windows page file is on a 12GB partition on my second internal 1TB drive and is the first of 3 partitions on that drive, the other 2 partitions is where all my files are, and that is backed up on 3 other drives with 2 of those kept off site in two locations.
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Bill Koenig,
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2009, 12:51:49 PM »
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There are no benefits (speed or otherwise) to having multiple partitions on the same physical drive. The drives holding PS' scratch file and Windows' swap file should both be separate physical drives, preferably different than your data drives. The reason I asked about disk activity is because it indicates that Windows or PS is finding it necessary to dump stuff in RAM to disk to make room for whatever you're doing--in this case opening files in ACR.
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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2009, 04:29:03 PM »
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Quote from: Jonathan Wienke
There are no benefits (speed or otherwise) to having multiple partitions on the same physical drive. The drives holding PS' scratch file and Windows' swap file should both be separate physical drives, preferably different than your data drives. The reason I asked about disk activity is because it indicates that Windows or PS is finding it necessary to dump stuff in RAM to disk to make room for whatever you're doing--in this case opening files in ACR.

My PhotoShop scratch drive is used only by PS when its running, or when Autopano pro is running, I only run one or the other, never both at the same time. This made a big difference with APP temp files.
The Windows page file that's on the 12GB partition, is this better than just leaving it on my C: drive? I also have it set to "Let System Manage size"
The reason that I have 3 partitions, well, the first one is the 12 GB for Windows page, the second one for new files, and the third for all of my old files from a older smaller HD that I filled up, and I just wanted to keep them separate from each other.
 
I assumed that making the 12 GB partition for the page file was better than leaving on the C: drive. I do know the the PS scratch drive should be a stand alone drive so I didn't want to partition that. I have room for one more HD, could buy another HD just for the page file.
Please let me know if there's a better way than what I'm already doing.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2009, 04:33:31 PM by Bill Koenig » Logged

Bill Koenig,
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2009, 08:29:22 PM »
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Quote from: Bill Koenig
The Windows page file that's on the 12GB partition, is this better than just leaving it on my C: drive? I also have it set to "Let System Manage size"

Double-plus-ungood, it is no better because it is the same physical drive--different partition means nothing performance-wise. And it's better to specify a fixed size for the swap file, otherwise it will quickly become fragmented as the size fluctuates and performance will go into the toilet. Make it a fixed size (say 2x your RAM) and then make sure the swap file is properly defragmented with PerfectDisk or similar tool that will actually defragment system files (needs to have a defragment-during-reboot option).
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PierreVandevenne
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« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2009, 07:35:45 AM »
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Quote from: Bill Koenig
I have PS CS3, after I open ACR, its unresponsive for about 60 to 90 seconds, then it slowly comes to life and then works normally. Any ideas as to what's slowing it down?
BTW, I have a fast PC with 4 GB of ram.

Is it ACR that is slow, or Photoshop coming up?

I once had a dramatic slowdown in PS CS3 startup time. The reason was that the default printer wasn't available. I set it up to a printer that was always available and the issue was solved.

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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2009, 02:10:42 PM »
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Quote from: Jonathan Wienke
Double-plus-ungood, it is no better because it is the same physical drive--different partition means nothing performance-wise. And it's better to specify a fixed size for the swap file, otherwise it will quickly become fragmented as the size fluctuates and performance will go into the toilet. Make it a fixed size (say 2x your RAM) and then make sure the swap file is properly defragmented with PerfectDisk or similar tool that will actually defragment system files (needs to have a defragment-during-reboot option).

For the fixed size, there are two values, the initial size, and the Max size, I have 4 GB of ram in my PC so max size is 8 GB or 8000 MB, so what the initial size be? I've been looking around the net trying to find a answer with out any luck.
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Bill Koenig,
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2009, 08:38:50 PM »
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Quote from: Bill Koenig
For the fixed size, there are two values, the initial size, and the Max size, I have 4 GB of ram in my PC so max size is 8 GB or 8000 MB, so what the initial size be? I've been looking around the net trying to find a answer with out any luck.

Make both initial and maximum 8000 (or 8192). Then make sure the new file gets defragmented properly. Keeping initial and maximum values the same prevents the file from becoming re-fragmented once it's been defragmented.
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