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Author Topic: Love those Trees  (Read 214085 times)
Didymus
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« Reply #740 on: December 02, 2012, 10:21:29 PM »
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Fog among the trees
Slowly lifts to make things clear
The sun finds it's way
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Bruce Cox
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« Reply #741 on: December 03, 2012, 09:38:31 AM »
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Oak?
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Didymus
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« Reply #742 on: December 03, 2012, 09:46:46 AM »
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Oak?
Yes
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stevenf
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« Reply #743 on: December 03, 2012, 04:43:31 PM »
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Here are four new tree images from my recent fall shoot in the rockies. Horseman 617, Fuji Velvia 50 film.

Hopefully you find these interesting.

Steven

http://www.friedmanphoto.com

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Mjollnir
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« Reply #744 on: December 03, 2012, 07:28:11 PM »
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Here are four new tree images from my recent fall shoot in the rockies. Horseman 617, Fuji Velvia 50 film.

Hopefully you find these interesting.

Steven

http://www.friedmanphoto.com



"Hanging on" has a tiny bit of a blue cast to it.  I like that.  It works.

Very nice.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2012, 08:28:16 PM by Mjollnir » Logged
RobbieV
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« Reply #745 on: December 04, 2012, 08:39:56 AM »
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Even though the composition of "harmony" is seen a lot, I like your take on it. A lot.
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RobbieV
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« Reply #746 on: December 04, 2012, 08:57:29 AM »
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« Last Edit: December 04, 2012, 08:59:33 AM by RobbieV » Logged
kencameron
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« Reply #747 on: December 15, 2012, 05:27:40 AM »
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Night Trees

Illuminated by a portable floodlight from a balcony. The sea is in the darkness behind.
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #748 on: December 16, 2012, 04:32:39 AM »
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Three from Majorca - the olive tree is from Banyalbufar (sorry for the accents) - this one did probably see a few centuries passing by!
The pine trees in the 2 others were just by my hotel in Peguera.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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kikashi
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« Reply #749 on: December 16, 2012, 12:36:46 PM »
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Night Trees

Illuminated by a portable floodlight from a balcony. The sea is in the darkness behind.

Ghostly. I like it.

Jeremy
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #750 on: December 16, 2012, 03:16:11 PM »
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Three from Majorca - the olive tree is from Banyalbufar (sorry for the accents) - this one did probably see a few centuries passing by!
The pine trees in the 2 others were just by my hotel in Peguera.

That middle one would have some stories to tell!!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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RobbieV
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« Reply #751 on: December 20, 2012, 08:56:59 AM »
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Climbing trees.


I miss how long the after noon light lasts in the summer time.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2012, 09:00:12 AM by RobbieV » Logged
NikoJorj
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« Reply #752 on: December 20, 2012, 09:47:32 AM »
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Above the Lac du Bourget in front of Aix les Bains, Savoie, France.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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Rob C
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« Reply #753 on: December 20, 2012, 03:36:06 PM »
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Above the Lac du Bourget in front of Aix les Bains, Savoie, France.



Niko, this is interesting for me.

I feel very little about your Mallorcan stuff, either for or agin, because, I suppose, Iíve been here for 31 years and counting and every guy doing local stock has masses of the same material buried somewhere.

By contrast, your Savoie picture really does appeal to me.

So, whatís going on here, in my head? Am I incapable of seeing the local wood for the trees (groan!) or is it that distant grass is always greener, and that we are condemned to base all of our judgments on the measure of our own experiences and find it impossible to be objective in matters of taste?

I donít live in the States, and have never set eyes upon the Big Split, the Grand Erosion, but I have seen so many images of it that it has utterly stripped away any curiosity and I have not the remotest wish ever to visit it in reality.

This same ennui must, I imagine (never asked a medic to confirm), affect doctors as it does model photographers regarding the female body. After so much looking and pretty impersonal observation, is there a dulling of the erotic sensitivity when it comes down to personal relationships? As Iíve never been anyone but myself, I have no personal means of telling: canít run the same race twice. I guess neither can a doctor. Not much point in asking, I suppose.

But it makes one wonder.

Rob C
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #754 on: December 21, 2012, 05:45:21 AM »
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is it that distant grass is always greener, and that we are condemned to base all of our judgments on the measure of our own experiences and find it impossible to be objective in matters of taste?
I'd rather bet on this one - after all, the desire to profit from that elusive distant grass must have somehow grown hardwired into us as an evolutionary advantage, as might have been the male awe and female envy for a young female body with nice round hips (meaning better chances to survive a pregnancy?).

Being able to add value to those personal seeings, something that might add another level of significance, is just a ethereal ideal - even though a few of Ansel Adam's photographs actually do make me want visit the Grand Canyon (but I fear I may only see the ordinary stuff).

Being neither a medic nor a model photographer, I cannot answer your other question.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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jeremypayne
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« Reply #755 on: December 21, 2012, 07:55:22 AM »
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I donít live in the States, and have never set eyes upon the Big Split, the Grand Erosion, but I have seen so many images of it that it has utterly stripped away any curiosity and I have not the remotest wish ever to visit it in reality.

That's silly, Rob. 

I've seen a good number of images of the crack in the ground, too ... and I can assure you that there isn't an image out there that truly captures the full glory of sunset at the Grand Canyon live and in person ... or hiking into and out of the canyon ... or looking over the edge ... or rafting down the Colorado ...

If you think you've "been there, done that" simply because you've seen some images of the place, you have short-changed yourself.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #756 on: December 21, 2012, 08:52:18 AM »
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If you think you've "been there, done that" simply because you've seen some images of the place, you have short-changed yourself.
I've been to GC once, after having seen countless excellent photographs of the place. Jeremy is right: No amount of studying pictures beforehand repared me for the real thing, which was indescribably awesome.

The same goes for a number of other places I've been to, such as Canadian Rockies, Death Valley, ...
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Rob C
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« Reply #757 on: December 21, 2012, 09:14:24 AM »
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I've been to GC once, after having seen countless excellent photographs of the place. Jeremy is right: No amount of studying pictures beforehand repared me for the real thing, which was indescribably awesome.

The same goes for a number of other places I've been to, such as Canadian Rockies, Death Valley, ...




Well Zabriskie Point has a certain elegance...

However, it'll all remain out of reach now, as nobody will give me travel insurance anymore at realistic rates. Ironic, really, because if I could afford that pesky M9 then the insurance would follow!

But I have flown over the African version and I think it's even deeper...

;-)

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #758 on: December 21, 2012, 09:28:06 AM »
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That's silly, Rob.  

I've seen a good number of images of the crack in the ground, too ... and I can assure you that there isn't an image out there that truly captures the full glory of sunset at the Grand Canyon live and in person ... or hiking into and out of the canyon ... or looking over the edge ... or rafting down the Colorado ...

If you think you've "been there, done that" simply because you've seen some images of the place, you have short-changed yourself.


Once, I had a PR client who booked me to do a shoot with him in Port Glasgow, on the Clyde. I'd imagined it was just a building, and it was, but the job consisted of going up in one of those lifts that are stapled to the exterior of the shells of new highrises. I've never been so petrified in my life. I detest heights except when flying, and I once had the pleasure of the combination of window seat and beautiful weather that let me see the world beneath me from Glasgow to Palma de Mallorca; tried to guess where in France we were, but it was quite impossible to tell. Still a beautiful experience, though. We have some pretty tall sea cliffs here; I avoid them too when I can, which is mostly unless there are visitors.

When we first came to live here I went to catch a sunrise on the headland from the top of Formentor; my son was with me and apart from the seagulls sussing us out it was absolutely silent. But it didn't feel good, however beautiful it was; just felt that we shouldn't really be there, that we were intruders into another world where we didn't belong.

Rob C
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dmerger
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« Reply #759 on: December 21, 2012, 11:21:53 AM »
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tried to guess where in France we were, but it was quite impossible to tell.

I've used a GPS, with built in maps, on flights.  Flying is a little more enjoyable if you can identify what you're seeing out the window. 

I agree with the comments above about the Grand Canyon and other landscapes.  No matter how good a photo I capture, or other great photos I've seen, none of them come close to capturing the beauty and awe of the real thing.
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Dean Erger
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