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Author Topic: Inspiration from Nature  (Read 8384 times)
tim wolcott
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« on: December 14, 2009, 07:14:45 PM »
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Inspiration comes from many sources.  I spend 20 hours a week minimum, looking at art and photographs so I can be inspired when I go out to create my next image.  Whether it comes from paintings or photographs, there is always something to be moved by.  

I recently released a book called "Along the Waters Edge".  Its about my thoughts and what inspires me to keep creating great imagery.  

Nature inspires our hearts and captures our souls.

I'm sorry you will need to have powerpoint to see this but I'm not a software geek.  Hope you like and inspires you.

Sorry the software softens the images, but you get the point.

Sorry will not let me do a pps file.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 10:26:29 AM by tim wolcott » Logged
wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2009, 01:33:37 AM »
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Thanks, Tim.  If you save the file as a PowerPoint Show (.pps instead of .ppt), you won't need PowerPoint to see it.

Here... allow me.  

Well, maybe not:  "Upload failed. You are not permitted to upload this type of file."  But apparently you can.

Mike.

Nice work, BTW!
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
stamper
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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2009, 03:37:03 AM »
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Inspiration comes from many sources. I spend 20 hours a week minimum, looking at art and photographs so I can be inspired when I go out to create my next image. Whether it comes from paintings or photographs, there is always something to be moved by.

Unquote

As a plodding amateur the problem I have with this statement is if I look at an image that I have no hope of capturing then how does it inspire me? For example if I see a shimmering beach in Australia and look about the area of Scotland that I live in then all I see is garbage strewn sand on coastline then how do I relate to that? In other words surely you have to look images that you can go out and photograph that closely relates to what you can see. In a nutshell there isn't any point of looking at images of alligators if there aren't any in Scotland? As to paintings they IMO don't reflect reality, only someone's imagination?
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 03:39:42 AM by stamper » Logged

francois
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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2009, 04:53:21 AM »
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Thanks for sharing…
 
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Francois
stamper
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« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2009, 06:50:48 AM »
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Sorry the software softens the images, but you get the point.

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I think the effect is good. Very nice images. This is the first time that I have seen this kind of presentation and I am impressed.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2009, 09:50:45 AM »
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Quote from: wolfnowl
Thanks, Tim.  If you save the file as a PowerPoint Show (.pps instead of .ppt), you won't need PowerPoint to see it.

Here... allow me.  

Well, maybe not:  "Upload failed. You are not permitted to upload this type of file."  But apparently you can.

Mike.

Nice work, BTW!
Wolf very nice thanks, I may know how to invent a lot in photography inventions, but, I may not be very smart in software.  Thanks again Tim
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 10:17:50 AM by tim wolcott » Logged
tim wolcott
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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2009, 10:16:18 AM »
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Quote from: stamper
Quote
Inspiration comes from many sources. I spend 20 hours a week minimum, looking at art and photographs so I can be inspired when I go out to create my next image. Whether it comes from paintings or photographs, there is always something to be moved by.

Unquote

As a plodding amateur the problem I have with this statement is if I look at an image that I have no hope of capturing then how does it inspire me? For example if I see a shimmering beach in Australia and look about the area of Scotland that I live in then all I see is garbage strewn sand on coastline then how do I relate to that? In other words surely you have to look images that you can go out and photograph that closely relates to what you can see. In a nutshell there isn't any point of looking at images of alligators if there aren't any in Scotland? As to paintings they IMO don't reflect reality, only someone's imagination?

Stamper, I'm sorry you feel that way.  But I was not born into money, I worked my butt off so I could travel and pay for my gear.  For nearly 18 hours a day I was training as pro runner and working for pro photographers then my friends and I would blast to wherever to find pure nature.  But nature comes in many forms.  Surely the light on some of these images can be found on the light of a single tree or flower ect.  If you can't find that light is always changing and creating things of beauty in front of us.  Then I don't what to tell you.  You need to find inspiration because without it there is no real hope!!!
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2009, 03:00:30 PM »
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Tim - Nice set of images, especially the dogwoods and redwoods. The saturation is a bit strong for my taste in some of them, but I feel that way about a lot of Velvia film images that others like so maybe that's just me.


Quote from: stamper
As a plodding amateur the problem I have with this statement is if I look at an image that I have no hope of capturing then how does it inspire me? For example if I see a shimmering beach in Australia and look about the area of Scotland that I live in then all I see is garbage strewn sand on coastline then how do I relate to that? In other words surely you have to look images that you can go out and photograph that closely relates to what you can see. In a nutshell there isn't any point of looking at images of alligators if there aren't any in Scotland? As to paintings they IMO don't reflect reality, only someone's imagination?
Surely there's more to learn from the work of others than subject selection? The use of light and shadow, composition, etc?
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2009, 06:26:59 PM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
Tim - Nice set of images, especially the dogwoods and redwoods. The saturation is a bit strong for my taste in some of them, but I feel that way about a lot of Velvia film images that others like so maybe that's just me.



Surely there's more to learn from the work of others than subject selection? The use of light and shadow, composition, etc?
Jeff the images shown are not saturated by nay means.  The images were shot with P45 phase one camera and I had to lower the saturation of the images because the late spring snow storm caused the colors to be extra strong green and yellow green.  i dropped the yellow green by about 23 points to get to what I liked.

I was teaching a workshop at the time and the colors were insane.  

That is a very sad comment and is trouble by nature.  I remember driving all night just to get some time to shoot and get away from everything that creates stress and give yourself some pleasure.

Nature has a surprise around every corner.  TW

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stamper
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« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2009, 06:14:49 AM »
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Stamper, I'm sorry you feel that way. But I was not born into money, I worked my butt off so I could travel and pay for my gear. For nearly 18 hours a day I was training as pro runner and working for pro photographers then my friends and I would blast to wherever to find pure nature. But nature comes in many forms. Surely the light on some of these images can be found on the light of a single tree or flower ect. If you can't find that light is always changing and creating things of beauty in front of us. Then I don't what to tell you. You need to find inspiration because without it there is no real hope!!!

Unquote

There seems to be a little over reaction? The post wasn't a personal attack on you! I couldn't fathom out how you could relate with other person's paintings and images and then go out and be inspired? This is a problem that I have and I find that advice difficult to fathom? It is obvious that my imagination is lacking? If I am out on my travels with my camera then I can only relate to what is there whether it is landscape, buildings etc etc. The light is constantly changing so I can't relate to what I have seen on my computer or magazines ? Surely most of what you capture is by instinctive means or subconscious experience?
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stamper
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« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2009, 06:23:40 AM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
Tim - Nice set of images, especially the dogwoods and redwoods. The saturation is a bit strong for my taste in some of them, but I feel that way about a lot of Velvia film images that others like so maybe that's just me.



Surely there's more to learn from the work of others than subject selection? The use of light and shadow, composition, etc?

If I see a good image of something in my area then I will go out and try and better it. I find this a good exercise because I am trying to get a better composition or angle or light but not copying it for the sake of it?  If the image is from a part of the country or world that I don't have any hope of  taking a image of then how do I get inspiration from it? You may know how it can be done but I don't. Ultimately the difference between a good photographer and an exceptional one - apart from technical ability - is imagination? Can that be taught?
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2009, 10:04:03 AM »
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Quote from: stamper
If I see a good image of something in my area then I will go out and try and better it. I find this a good exercise because I am trying to get a better composition or angle or light but not copying it for the sake of it?  If the image is from a part of the country or world that I don't have any hope of  taking a image of then how do I get inspiration from it? You may know how it can be done but I don't. Ultimately the difference between a good photographer and an exceptional one - apart from technical ability - is imagination? Can that be taught?
Stamper, the first thing is not to look through your viewfinder in your camera.  I'm not sure why photographers got a way from shooting this way.  But I was taught by a friend of Ansel's Adams.  He always said get your self a system, by using a framing card  "this is a 11x14 black card with a hole cut in it to match the way you frame and exhibit."  By looking through the hole it allows you to see everything in real light not diffused by your camera's viewfinder.

It will allow you to see and compose at a much higher level and really fine tune what you are shooting.

The other thing I teach is make notes or draw your images out from things you see.  Everything I see whether its paintings or photo's give me ideas of things I've like to see and create.  Lighting, composition, trees, ponds, lakes, mountains ect get throw together in my head and then I draw them as reminders of images to be created.  Sometimes it has taken me 7 years to find the image, sometimes it not exactly that but a mixture of 2 images put together and everytime I go out to shoot I refresh my mind.  

I teach this in my workshops I teach.  You don't have to be a good drawer.  I will launch a set of images called "Ode To Monet" I love Monet and sought out to find and capture what I thought if Monet was a photographer how would he capture it and create the image..  I will do this a week or so.  Hope this helps.

Its still about Lighting, Composition,depth of field, choice of lens, angle of shooting and Imagination and Passion.

If your on Skype and you want to call  my user is tdwolcott.  I happy to help anyone.  Tim
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stamper
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« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2009, 11:07:15 AM »
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The other thing I teach is make notes or draw your images out from things you see.  Everything I see whether its paintings or photo's give me ideas of things I've like to see and create.  Lighting, composition, trees, ponds, lakes, mountains ect get throw together in my head and then I draw them as reminders of images to be created.  Sometimes it has taken me 7 years to find the image, sometimes it not exactly that but a mixture of 2 images put together and everytime I go out to shoot I refresh my mind.  

Unquote

I think that - no disrespect - this is beyond what most photographers understand and are prepared to do? If you are saying that this is necessary to advance to a good level then myself and others will be toiling? To me images are what I see in reality when I am out with my camera. Visualising what isn't there and trying  to "create" an image from my mind isn't imo photography? I look and see what is there and if I like it I will bracket several shots from different angles and exposures and enhance them on the computer to make up the deficiencies of my camera, a Nikon D300. You are taking photography well beyond an art form?
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2009, 01:47:02 PM »
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Quote from: stamper
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The other thing I teach is make notes or draw your images out from things you see.  Everything I see whether its paintings or photo's give me ideas of things I've like to see and create.  Lighting, composition, trees, ponds, lakes, mountains ect get throw together in my head and then I draw them as reminders of images to be created.  Sometimes it has taken me 7 years to find the image, sometimes it not exactly that but a mixture of 2 images put together and everytime I go out to shoot I refresh my mind.  

Unquote

I think that - no disrespect - this is beyond what most photographers understand and are prepared to do? If you are saying that this is necessary to advance to a good level then myself and others will be toiling? To me images are what I see in reality when I am out with my camera. Visualising what isn't there and trying  to "create" an image from my mind isn't imo photography? I look and see what is there and if I like it I will bracket several shots from different angles and exposures and enhance them on the computer to make up the deficiencies of my camera, a Nikon D300. You are taking photography well beyond an art form?
I don't see why you are putting limits on yourself.  The equipment is just a tool, meant to capture what you have put in front of it.  Great lighting takes amazing amount of time and discipline.  It takes a lot of patience, to wait for the right light or to hike back to the same place until the scene is where I want it.  

Maybe I do take it to the extremes and pain is just part of the game to hike 80 pound pack back into the woods day after day.  But as I've said a thousand times before I'd rather come back with one image that is great than one that is average.

If you wait for the right light, you don't have to expand the saturation.  I lecture against that,  NO AMOUNT OF PHOTOSHOP WILL OR CAN MAKE UP FOR NATURAL LIGHTING, COMPOSITION, PICKING THE RIGHT FOCAL LENGTH LENS, CHOOSING THE RIGHT DEPTH OF FIELD AND THE RIGHT ANGLE TO SHOOT IMAGE.

ITS NOT ABOUT TECH, ITS ABOUT THE PERSON BEHIND THE CAMERA.

But please give the framing card a chance.  There is a reason why the master's used it before us.  Try to capture it one shot, envision what you want and create it.

We have better tools for capturing photography than ever before, wider range of light, more resolution, software to control the image, and inkjet printing equipment to print it.  There should be very little guess work involved.

And for God's sake never ever say the thing I hate most "let's see what I've got now"  when you have shot a scene.

Start with a simple trial.  Get a framing card and then  single white tulip.  Put that under a open shade porch so no direct light is on the tulip.  Walk around the tulip with a black framing card,  at one point or two the tulip will come alive with beautiful lighting.  Then is you want add some background color to the shot with fabric ect.  you have just started to envision the shot.

The God's every now and then give a magic in the woods, we are just there to receive and capture it.  I hope this help,

My goal is always to  "Capture light at its most intimate moment"  have fun Tim
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Rob C
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« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2009, 01:48:25 PM »
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I think stamper has more than a point; I lived in Scotland for decades and the huge bulk of my calendar shoots was done away in the sunshine somewhere else, one of those somewheres being Spain. Now, living here but well past my commercial days, I can't do the stuff I used to do here. It has nothing to do with seeing, nothing to do with inspiration. It has everything to do with finance. Who's money is gonna pay the model is the name of the problem. So no, it isn't all in the head by any manner or means.

As for spending time looking at photographs and paintings, well, I did most of my paintings gawping when I was in my teens. The photography bit came towards the end of that time via US photographic magazines and particularly Popular Photography Annual and Color Annual. Now, it's the turn of the web. But I don't look there for inspiration because I don't need it; it is already there but stifled because of the finance. I look at the sites because I still love pictures.

As for teaching - well, I abandoned photo night-school fairly quickly when I realised it had nothing to teach me that I wanted to know. I have never believed you can teach photography as the art, but I have no doubt that you can teach an ape the mechanics.

Rob C
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stamper
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« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2009, 03:47:56 AM »
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Tim the thumbnail you have in your last post. Was the saturation in it that vivid when you shot the image? Your methods obviously work for you but for most photographers it would be too much work! I think we can agree to differ on this subject? LOL
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cmi
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« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2009, 04:42:15 AM »
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Thanks Tim, both for your advice and the ppt of the book! Awesome images.

Christian
« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 04:42:52 AM by Christian Miersch » Logged
BlasR
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« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2009, 08:30:35 AM »
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I was trying to find a hotographer the hav this photo, to get some inspiration, but I can't find anyone.

Special with the bird the just land when I was taking this photo
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2009, 05:05:02 PM »
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Quote from: stamper
Tim the thumbnail you have in your last post. Was the saturation in it that vivid when you shot the image? Your methods obviously work for you but for most photographers it would be too much work! I think we can agree to differ on this subject? LOL


Yes that image was taken straight, I had waited for 3 hours for the light to stream through the trees to create this effect.  I don't use filters, I like natural light slightly filters by a cirrus cloud.  I find that that is the best lighting,  When I post my Ode to Monet series you will see some amazing colors.  I was showing some people who live near there how to create this effect with the lighting and choice of depth of field and lens.  

Thanks Tim
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John R
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« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2009, 06:04:01 PM »
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I don't subscribe to use of a framing card, except perhaps as an aid or tool for teaching. There are whole books on teaching "Visual Design" and "the art of seeing." However, I do agree, that no amount of post processing is going to help your work if it is not good to begin with. Nowadays, what I call "photo illustration" often gets by as photography. I don't think we will escape this blurring of disciplines and the marriage of the arts in the digital age. It is here to stay.

JMR
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