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Author Topic: Inspiration from Nature  (Read 8292 times)
tim wolcott
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« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2009, 06:22:39 PM »
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Quote from: John R
I don't subscribe to use of a framing card, except perhaps as an aid or tool for teaching. There are whole books on teaching "Visual Design" and "the art of seeing." However, I do agree, that no amount of post processing is going to help your work if it is not good to begin with. Nowadays, what I call "photo illustration" often gets by as photography. I don't think we will escape this blurring of disciplines and the marriage of the arts in the digital age. It is here to stay.

JMR


Not to keep badgering the idea of using a framing card, but if the masters who shot before us, used them.  Who are we to say otherwise.  But I will say that a framing card by far is the best way to subtract the elements away from what you are really trying to compose.  There is no way to otherwise block out what is truly important to your images you about to create.  You get to see it in real light, see exactly the balance of your image.  And by looking through the black whole you can see the delicate lighting and hue shifts when you are waiting in that special place focused on the right lighting.

This why sport players use the black paint under their eyes, why golfers use there hand and dark clothing to block out everything around them.  There is great video of Ansel having students using this method, not that he is the end all and judge.  But clearly, it helps.  I teach everyone to use them and I have never had anyone not try it and love it, it helps them refine their images perfectly.  I suggest everyone try it and stop looking through the dark view finder of the camera.  Look thru the black whole and see it in natural light and fine tune your image and then set your camera up to that composition.  I'm sure it will help, but if don't like it find what works for you.  Tim
« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 06:26:42 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
JeffKohn
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« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2009, 09:36:11 PM »
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Well, to play devils advocate one reason Ansel used the framing card is because setting up the 8x10 view camera and looking through the ground glass took too much time.

I do agree that some sort of abstraction into a 'frame' is useful, but not necessarily for the seemingly obvious reason of showing how the composition will be framed. More importantly, it helps us to see the scene in 2-dimensions instead of 3D, and will give us a better idea of what the actual photo will look like. The frame takes what you're shooting out of the context of its 3-dimensional surroundings.

But it doesn't have to be a framing card. It could just as easily be a director's viewfinder, an SLR viewfinder, live-view on an LCD, heck some people can get by closing one eye and using their hands to frame (we've all seen that cliche of movie directors doing this).
« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 09:36:26 PM by JeffKohn » Logged

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« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2009, 09:43:15 PM »
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Quote from: stamper
If I see a good image of something in my area then I will go out and try and better it. I find this a good exercise because I am trying to get a better composition or angle or light but not copying it for the sake of it?  If the image is from a part of the country or world that I don't have any hope of  taking a image of then how do I get inspiration from it? You may know how it can be done but I don't. Ultimately the difference between a good photographer and an exceptional one - apart from technical ability - is imagination? Can that be taught?
There's more to learn from an image then just the subject. You can learn about leading lines, the use of light and shadow, repeating patterns, complimentary colors, unusual perspective, etc, etc, etc. It doesn't have to be about shooting _that_ mountain or _that_ tree. Just look at images, and when you see one you like, study and figure out _what_ you like about it, and how you might incorporate that into your future work.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #23 on: December 17, 2009, 09:46:46 PM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
There's more to learn from an image then just the subject. You can learn about leading lines, the use of light and shadow, repeating patterns, complimentary colors, unusual perspective, etc, etc, etc. It doesn't have to be about shooting _that_ mountain or _that_ tree. Just look at images, and when you see one you like, study and figure out _what_ you like about it, and how you might incorporate that into your future work.


Jeff, great couldn't say it any better.  The lighting of a great nude is the same kind of light on a tree or flower.  Its all relevant.  Perfect, thats the comment I was looking for.  You can shoot with me anyday.  Tim
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eleanorbrown
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« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2009, 09:21:28 AM »
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Nicely done Tim!  I too am, and have always been, deeply inspired by our natural world.  Rather than a book I've started making individual unbound folios of individual series of images.....after studying the Lenswork DVD on making folios!  I also add optional selectable music  on my site as I'm also inspired by combinations of music and images sometimes.  eleanor

I recently released a book called "Along the Waters Edge".  Its about my thoughts and what inspires me to keep creating great imagery.  

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tim wolcott
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« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2009, 11:03:18 AM »
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Quote from: eleanorbrown
Nicely done Tim!  I too am, and have always been, deeply inspired by our natural world.  Rather than a book I've started making individual unbound folios of individual series of images.....after studying the Lenswork DVD on making folios!  I also add optional selectable music  on my site as I'm also inspired by combinations of music and images sometimes.  eleanor

I recently released a book called "Along the Waters Edge".  Its about my thoughts and what inspires me to keep creating great imagery.


Eleanor, Like what your doing.  The old clothes are very nice they have that feeling of stepping back in time..  Very nice.  Tim
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« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2009, 05:00:49 PM »
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Quote from: eleanorbrown
I recently released a book called "Along the Waters Edge".  Its about my thoughts and what inspires me to keep creating great imagery.

Sounds intriguing, Eleanor.  Do you have any links or samples of your book?

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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« Reply #27 on: December 18, 2009, 05:36:49 PM »
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Mike I am doing "folios" which are like an unbound book but with small original prints. here is a link to what I'm doing:
http://web.mac.com/eleanorbrown/ELEANOR_BR...own_Folios.html
Eleanor

Quote from: wolfnowl
Sounds intriguing, Eleanor.  Do you have any links or samples of your book?

Mike.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2009, 11:15:32 PM »
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Quote from: eleanorbrown
Mike I am doing "folios" which are like an unbound book but with small original prints. here is a link to what I'm doing:
http://web.mac.com/eleanorbrown/ELEANOR_BR...own_Folios.html
Eleanor
Eleanor,

That is very elegant and beautiful work. I'm looking forward to the extended LensWork.


Eric

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tim wolcott
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« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2009, 09:25:10 PM »
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Quote from: JeffKohn
There's more to learn from an image then just the subject. You can learn about leading lines, the use of light and shadow, repeating patterns, complimentary colors, unusual perspective, etc, etc, etc. It doesn't have to be about shooting _that_ mountain or _that_ tree. Just look at images, and when you see one you like, study and figure out _what_ you like about it, and how you might incorporate that into your future work.

If only everyone would stop spending time pixel counting or trying to learn tech things that want help you shoot better and just listen to what I have said and Jeff.  He's a smart man.  Tim
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #30 on: December 24, 2009, 09:00:28 PM »
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I have to tell love what you did with the presentation.  The writing sure fits the story line.  This is quite unique and beautiful.  Are all these images from california or the west coast.  Can you tell if you don't mind where these were taken.  Great portfolio, one of the nicest I have ever seen.  You should put these into Lenswork.  JP

Quote from: tim wolcott
If only everyone would stop spending time pixel counting or trying to learn tech things that want help you shoot better and just listen to what I have said and Jeff.  He's a smart man.  Tim
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #31 on: December 26, 2009, 07:06:43 PM »
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Some of these images are from Sequoia, some from Mossbrae, trinity forests near Shasta, and Kruse Rhododendron.  But most are just thos by looking at the trees to see how they are going to bloom but don't really have a name.  I simply grid the forest and walk up and down to see what parts of the forests look great and come back when they are at their best.  If you have specific questions please don't hesitate.  Tim

Quote from: JamiePeters
I have to tell love what you did with the presentation.  The writing sure fits the story line.  This is quite unique and beautiful.  Are all these images from california or the west coast.  Can you tell if you don't mind where these were taken.  Great portfolio, one of the nicest I have ever seen.  You should put these into Lenswork.  JP
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« Reply #32 on: December 27, 2009, 09:50:37 AM »
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Quote from: eleanorbrown
Mike I am doing "folios" which are like an unbound book but with small original prints. here is a link to what I'm doing:
http://web.mac.com/eleanorbrown/ELEANOR_BR...own_Folios.html
Eleanor


Those are very nice Eleanor.  Do you have the folios diecut and embossed or do you do all the cutting yourself?
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Alain Briot
Author of Mastering Landscape Photography, Mastering Composition, Creativity and Personal Style., Marketing Fine Art Photography and How Photographs are Sold.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #33 on: December 27, 2009, 05:04:51 PM »
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Not to keep beating the horse but great presentation Eleanor.  I don't have the time to make my own, so I ordered some danecreekfolios.com.  Will let everyone know how I like them when I get them.  If anyone knows of any others that sell them please let me know.  I'm really looking for much bigger ones.  

  Thanks Much Tim

Quote from: alainbriot
Those are very nice Eleanor.  Do you have the folios diecut and embossed or do you do all the cutting yourself?
« Last Edit: December 27, 2009, 05:06:08 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
JamiePeters
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« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2009, 10:50:29 PM »
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Tim, would like to see a folio done with that set of images.  Any plans.  Had to look at this again.  Simply amazing.  Now this is what photography is about.  Creating images that inspire the soul.  Thanks again it brings tears to my eyes.  

Would like to take one of your photo workshops.  I understand that you will be announcing some on Michael's site.  Is this true.  JP
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2009, 04:30:33 PM »
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Not sure where you heard this, but I will be announcing some on Michael's site.  We will be going to Alaska, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and some parts of California.  Mostly where I have shown you some of the images from on the website.  

Glad you have enjoyed them.  T
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2010, 07:37:19 PM »
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Gee, I guess what we said in this forum was just what George had said in his.  Learning from other photographers and artists.  I think nearly everyone that responded to this article did a good job.  George also said it very well.  Its exactly what I have been trying to say from my first posting.  Knowledge of art and its influences is the key.  Tech is just tech.  Thanks Guys and gals  

Tim
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 07:49:25 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
eleanorbrown
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« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2010, 07:55:00 PM »
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Hi alain, sorry to be so late in answering but I just came across your question.  I started out hand cutting with a very sharp blade on Neenah cover weight paper 100 lb.  I still hand cut some  covers too ( I'm added more folios) but also I've bought some wonderful die cut covers from www.danecreekfolios.com.  There are really beautifully designed and are reasonably  priced.  These die cut covers are embossed around the edge of the front window. see this link to see what I've done with these danecreek folio covers.(see bottom of the sample images)....eleanor
whoops forgot the link! here is it:
http://web.mac.com/eleanorbrown/ELEANOR_BR...own_Folios.html

Quote from: alainbriot
Those are very nice Eleanor.  Do you have the folios diecut and embossed or do you do all the cutting yourself?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 07:56:54 PM by eleanorbrown » Logged

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