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Author Topic: Test your color skills  (Read 18369 times)
Justan
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« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2009, 10:38:11 AM »
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Quote from: EricM
I did the worst of anybody here so far and I like the test. It just verifies what I'v known for many years from amny other tests (Ishihara being the first): I have faulty red-green vision and no amount of monitor calibration is going to fix that.


Now if someone could come up with an effective way of producing a reliable "eye calibration profile", I'd be interested. 

This test appears to be similar in a way to audio tests in which a person can compare and try to reproduce a specific series of tones. The goal of the test is to see if one has “perfect pitch,” or how close to “perfect pitch” one has.

Here we see that, in a similar way, not everyone sees color hues as they exist. Of course there are a number of possible reasons for this. The accuracy of the monitor, if the monitor is color calibrated, if the background lighting in the room are too bright or impart a color, the mood of the person taking the test and any number of other external influences. But the long and short is that many don’t have quite the ability to discern hues as they might want to have.

This phenomena raises some interesting philosophical questions, but they are perhaps best left for other forums….
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Littlefield
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« Reply #41 on: December 19, 2009, 12:06:13 PM »
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Score of 4 on old calibrated Trinitron monitor
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walter.sk
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« Reply #42 on: December 19, 2009, 04:21:39 PM »
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Quote from: Justan
FACT: 1 out of 255 women and 1 out of 12 men have some form of color vision deficiency.
Take the online color challenge, based on the official FM100 Hue Test by X-Rite.

Best possible score is 0 and the worst or highest is 1241


I got 16

http://www.xrite.com/custom_page.aspx?PageID=77
I'm 69 and male.  A quick rearrangement of the color tiles gave me a score of 11.    I had 7 problems in the green-to-blue range, and 4 in the pink area.

I have a well-profiled NEC 3090.  I think I could have done better except that it got too tedious and I became bored.  I'll go back in a few days and try again, before I work on my pictures for the day.

I'm not sure what this test actually shows, and how valid or reliable it is.

Thanks for posting the link.  Just something more to obsess about, I guess.  At least it didn't cost me any money!
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schrodingerscat
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« Reply #43 on: December 19, 2009, 09:48:14 PM »
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Interesting exercise. As I moved the tiles around, my perception of a given tile changed depending on it's location in the line. Had a bit of fun just playing with that.

And since we see with our brain, many other factors can influence the outcome at any given time as well and renders it somewhat subjective.

For the morbidly curious - Age 58 male, calibrated '06 iMac, score 7(trouble with blue/green). At this time.
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Ray
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« Reply #44 on: December 20, 2009, 12:15:42 AM »
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Quote from: schrodingerscat
Interesting exercise. As I moved the tiles around, my perception of a given tile changed depending on it's location in the line. Had a bit of fun just playing with that.

And since we see with our brain, many other factors can influence the outcome at any given time as well and renders it somewhat subjective.

For the morbidly curious - Age 58 male, calibrated '06 iMac, score 7(trouble with blue/green). At this time.

It's well known that the perception of a specific color will change depending on its proximity to an adjoining color. This effect is also very obvious with shades of black and white. A pale grey square next to a deeply black square may appear as white. But the same pale grey square next to an even paler grey square will appear grey, and the paler grey will then seem white.

Checking on the RGB values of the squares in the first row in this test, I find a few pairs of values that are probably too close to differentiate, no matter how well-calibrated your monitor or how good your eyesight, but I could be wrong   .

They are: (1) 164, 114, 92, and 164, 114, 88, (2) 163, 121, 81, and 163, 119, 82, (3) 162, 117, 84, and 163, 115, 86.

The 0-255 system of 8 bits per channel creates a maximum range of 16.7 million colors. There's no way any person could visually distinguish between all those different shades (outside of numerical description). Most images, even high resolution images processed in the ProPhoto color space in 16 bit mode (capable of several billion different shades), in practice contain only a few thousand, or fewer, perhaps only a few hundred, visually distinguishably different shades, so I believe, but you understand I haven't personally counted all the different shades that may exist in any one of my photographs.  
« Last Edit: December 20, 2009, 12:33:25 AM by Ray » Logged
Rhossydd
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« Reply #45 on: December 20, 2009, 04:18:56 AM »
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I took a screen grab of my first test prior to scoring and went back to view it in Photoshop to check if I could see the difference on any tones I got wrong first time.
I could, so it just needed some patience to work through it and get a perfect score second time around.
It would be interesting to get a secondary score based on how long it took to complete the test or how many you could arrange correctly in a given time.

Score 6 at first attempt, 0 on second.
53 male.
NEC Spectraview 1980
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lmwacctg
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« Reply #46 on: December 21, 2009, 04:01:52 PM »
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Just tried it with my Dell 2408wfp regularly profiled with a ColorMunki, luminance level 120, whitepoint D50.

Age: 55-60

Score: 0

Found it quite difficult in certain areas, but obviously guessed right. IE is not colour managed, so I'm not sure what the result means.
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hsmeets
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« Reply #47 on: December 31, 2009, 10:59:36 AM »
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Score 0, age 46, male

At first try. However the way you can shove around the tiles makes this test somewhat easier as you can compare to siblings, so more a less a relative test then an absolute test of color vision, as in absolute hearing, no worries, in a few minutes i'm of to a new years eve party with friends :-)

[attachment=19052:Schermaf...17.55.02.png]

(iMac 27", calibrated)

Happy new year everybody!
« Last Edit: December 31, 2009, 11:06:40 AM by hsmeets » Logged

Paul Sumi
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« Reply #48 on: December 31, 2009, 11:33:41 AM »
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A 32, on my uncalibrated monitor at work.  Some difficulty in the blue-ish green region.  male, 54 yo.

Paul
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natas
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« Reply #49 on: December 31, 2009, 03:59:15 PM »
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lol, I got a 121....and yes I am color blind (2 different kinds)

It was very hard for me to do some of the colors, In fact 2 of the rows looks almost identical other than the darkness of the colors...so I arranged by how dark some of them were.

Luckily I have a wife who proofs all my print work before going to a client, she also helps me get WB right when I forget my gray card.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2009, 04:02:54 PM by natas » Logged
natas
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« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2009, 04:12:13 PM »
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Quote from: natas
lol, I got a 121....and yes I am color blind (2 different kinds)

It was very hard for me to do some of the colors, In fact 2 of the rows looks almost identical other than the darkness of the colors...so I arranged by how dark some of them were.

Luckily I have a wife who proofs all my print work before going to a client, she also helps me get WB right when I forget my gray card.

I just did the test again and I am still in the 100's  Man I wish they would come out with a color blind treatment
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David Saffir
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« Reply #51 on: January 01, 2010, 10:37:12 PM »
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couldn't resist. I'm 57, male, got a score of zero. dang.

David Saffir
http://davidsaffir.wordpress.com

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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #52 on: January 02, 2010, 08:25:09 AM »
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Quote from: stamper
I think this shows the futility of the test.


No, I think it shows its sensitivity. Small errors are easily caused by partial colorblindness, and many people are partially colorblind. From other tests I know my color vision is good, and this test gave me a zero score.

Cheers,
Bart
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #53 on: January 02, 2010, 08:38:05 AM »
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Quote from: natas
I just did the test again and I am still in the 100's  Man I wish they would come out with a color blind treatment

I'm so disappointed! Your 121 beat the heck out of my 108. But I only have one kind of color blindness to my knowledge.
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Dale Allyn
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« Reply #54 on: January 03, 2010, 02:01:46 AM »
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Surely, color-response/color-blindness is an important component here – as is monitor condition and status, i.e. calibrated or not, new or old, high quality or old, etc. But there is also another element that is missed in these discussions (this fun test is making the rounds): technique plays a roll as well. Many people do not know that there is something referred to (in some circles) as the "master eye effect". This is a bit different than the "dominate eye" in which we have one eye which dominates over the other with regard to perspective. It's used 100% of the time in diamond grading to determine the color grade of diamonds as they are compared to "masters" of known color grades.

Without getting into to the details of color grading diamonds (for fear of boring folks), one may see an improvement in the test results here if they are deliberate in the way in which they analyze troublesome patches. When you are confronted with squares which are difficult to separate, be sure to view them on opposites sides of each other. That is, if the tiles are "A" and "B", view them as AB and BA and back again – sometimes several times if needed. This is how diamond grading is done (with additional rules applied for when AB shows no difference, or BA shows no difference, but the converse does show a difference, etc. [colorimeters aren't great for diamonds because transparency enters in and it gets messy, etc.] )
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Marco Ugolini
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« Reply #55 on: January 09, 2010, 03:41:35 PM »
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Quote from: Justan
FACT: 1 out of 255 women and 1 out of 12 men have some form of color vision deficiency.
Take the online color challenge, based on the official FM100 Hue Test by X-Rite.

Best possible score is 0 and the worst or highest is 1241


I got 16

http://www.xrite.com/custom_page.aspx?PageID=77
My advice, if you work with color on a regular basis, is that you schedule a battery of color vision tests (Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue Test, Ishihara, etc.) at a local university's optometry department.

I do that based on the rule that knowing whether your color vision is accurate or not is always better than not knowing. At least, if you detect a problem, you will know when to be careful, thus avoiding embarrassment, and will preserve a certain level of professionalism by not being too cocky.

I go to UC Berkeley every four or five years. Last time it cost me $175.
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Marco Ugolini
bill t.
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« Reply #56 on: January 09, 2010, 09:33:28 PM »
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64 yo male.

Got a 4 last night.  Drove around a couple hours today in bright sunlight with sunglasses, got a 28 shortly thereafter.

No matter.  It's not how big your gamut is, it's how you use it.



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EricWHiss
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« Reply #57 on: February 01, 2010, 03:13:46 AM »
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I got a zero too, and I had fun doing it! Thanks for posting the link!
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Ken R
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« Reply #58 on: May 08, 2010, 03:55:47 AM »
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Hi, just did the test a bunch of times.

Lowest score was 101, highest 131. Did the test on 3 different computers with different monitors. Blue/green is a problem for me.

 
« Last Edit: May 08, 2010, 03:56:04 AM by sneakyracer » Logged
AlanShaw
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« Reply #59 on: May 08, 2010, 06:56:43 PM »
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Hmmm, scored 4, on a calibrated iMac. I could even see where the problem was, but couldn't get the tiles into a pattern that looked right.

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