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Author Topic: Spyder vs. Eye One, any difference?  (Read 14312 times)
kevs
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« on: December 22, 2009, 11:34:22 AM »
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Has anyone actually bought these two calibrators and tested them for comparison? Do they do the same quality job?
(I have new imac)
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probep
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2009, 12:03:58 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
Has anyone actually bought these two calibrators and tested them for comparison? Do they do the same quality job?
(I have new imac)
I have a Spyder3 Elite and an Eye-one Display 2 (as well as NEC optimized i1D2, ColorMunki Photo, i1Pro and i1Pro UV-cut).
My Spyder3 is the worst.
You can read this topic.
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kevs
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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2009, 12:52:30 PM »
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Quote from: probep
I have a Spyder3 Elite and an Eye-one Display 2 (as well as NEC optimized i1D2, ColorMunki Photo, i1Pro and i1Pro UV-cut).
My Spyder3 is the worst.
You can read this topic.
----
thanks Pro.
I have a new imac.
Before I had a Sony Artisan. So I'm used to just putting puck on, walking out of the room, coming back and it says the monitor is calibrated. Everything else is just over my head, and honestly I like it to be like that.
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With the Eye-one, will it be like that?

How did you determine the Eye-one is better than Spyder 3.

I asked a tech girl at X-rite if Eye- one is better/same/worse that Spyder, and she said they are probably the same, but that X-rite has much better tech support.
Hence,  I would choose X-rite for the more the better tech support. But it you have learned that the product is also better then it's a no brainer. I'll buy the eye one.

------
Finally do I need the version 2 (it's $50 more) thanks
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probep
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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2009, 01:14:46 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
----
thanks Pro.
I have a new imac.
Before I had a Sony Artisan. So I'm used to just putting puck on, walking out of the room, coming back and it says the monitor is calibrated. Everything else is just over my head, and honestly I like it to be like that.
Sorry, but I don't use Macintosh - I don't know that.

Quote
With the Eye-one, will it be like that?

How did you determine the Eye-one is better than Spyder 3.

I asked a tech girl at X-rite if Eye- one is better/same/worse that Spyder, and she said they are probably the same, but that X-rite has much better tech support.
Hence,  I would choose X-rite for the more the better tech support. But it you have learned that the product is also better then it's a no brainer. I'll buy the eye one.
I state only that MY Spyder3 is very inaccurate. My friend's Spyder3 is better than my one.
BTW, it's a quote from this site:

Quote
Standard (unmodified) Spyder meters as they are sold in the stores typically delivers results that are not reliable enough to be used for display calibration. In tests and discussions with pro calibrators we've found that approximately 1/3 of Spyder units seem to be very accurate. The next 1/3 are slightly off. The last third are considerably more inaccurate. Unfortunately there's no way to know how your Spyder unit rates unless you have a known accurate meter to compare it against. Therefore most calibration experts do not recommend that the standard Spyder be used as you simply don't know what sort of results to expect unless you've measured your Spyder against a known correct meter. The reason for this is that the Spyder units are not calibrated at the factory as they come off the assembly line.
And once again, read this post
« Last Edit: December 22, 2009, 01:16:13 PM by probep » Logged
kevs
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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2009, 02:08:04 PM »
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thanks, nice links.
Know difference between the eye one lt and 2
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« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2009, 03:06:39 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
With the Eye-one, will it be like that?

Not really. The Artisan was a smart monitor that could control the CRT instead of you having to muck around with the OSD buttons. There are such displays available that work this way. The NEC  SpectraView II’s with their host software as well as the Eizo line allow you to set once the target calibration aim points you want, put the puck on screen and walk away.
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Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2009, 05:27:02 PM »
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Not really. The Artisan was a smart monitor that could control the CRT instead of you having to muck around with the OSD buttons. There are such displays available that work this way. The NEC  SpectraView II’s with their host software as well as the Eizo line allow you to set once the target calibration aim points you want, put the puck on screen and walk away.
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Andrew thanks.
I may pick those monitors up one day... but -- I know you don't like Mac Monitors, but if you have to advise for the several million who have them, would you get the eye-one? and and the eye - one LT or eye one 2 (I have no idea the difference)

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What are OSD buttons?
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« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2009, 05:30:19 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
--------
I may pick those monitors up one day... but -- I know you don't like Mac Monitors, but if you have to advise for the several million who have them, would you get the eye-one? and and the eye - one LT or eye one 2 (I have no idea the difference)

-----
What are OSD buttons?

What’s a Mac monitor?

OSD is On Screen Display. You know where you have to hit some buttons to raise or lower say the backlight? With a smart monitor like your Artisan or the NEC, you tell the software what you want, it controls the panel. Its more precise and a lot easier on the end user.

FWIW, there is a poor man’s version from NEC called the P221. Not an IPS screen and it doesn’t have all the bells and whistles for purity control but I’d go for one long before I’d get a “dumb monitor”.
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Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2009, 05:48:59 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
What’s a Mac monitor?

OSD is On Screen Display. You know where you have to hit some buttons to raise or lower say the backlight? With a smart monitor like your Artisan or the NEC, you tell the software what you want, it controls the panel. Its more precise and a lot easier on the end user.

FWIW, there is a poor man’s version from NEC called the P221. Not an IPS screen and it doesn’t have all the bells and whistles for purity control but I’d go for one long before I’d get a “dumb monitor”.
-----
Andrew, so for imacs, if you were on a desert island and it's all you had, you would not even bother with the eye one?
You would save your money.
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« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2009, 05:53:36 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
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Andrew, so for imacs, if you were on a desert island and it's all you had, you would not even bother with the eye one?
You would save your money.

Ah, iMacs. OK. No, I don’t think highly of those displays. Might be great as a dual display system where the main display is a smart monitor. And yes, even if that’s the only display, you want to calibrate and profile it (even a laptop).
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Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2009, 07:59:46 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Ah, iMacs. OK. No, I don’t think highly of those displays. Might be great as a dual display system where the main display is a smart monitor. And yes, even if that’s the only display, you want to calibrate and profile it (even a laptop).
------
thanks, you don't have a strong opinon what to calibrate it with?
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« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2009, 08:08:46 PM »
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FWIW, there is a poor man’s version from NEC called the P221. Not an IPS screen and it doesn’t have all the bells and whistles for purity control but I’d go for one long before I’d get a “dumb monitor”.
And coupled with SpectraView and ColorMunki, it works pretty darn good.  I'm happy with mine and get a solid match when comparing the screen and print.
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kevs
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« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2009, 10:57:56 AM »
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Anyone know the difference between eye one LT and eye one 2?
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probep
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« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2009, 11:20:50 AM »
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Quote from: kevs
Anyone know the difference between eye one LT and eye one 2?
They have the same hardware. but have different settings in the i1 Match software that is supplied with devices. You can read specifications.
In other profiling applications (basICColor display, ColorEyes Display Pro, free ArgyllCMS, ProfileMaker etc) there is not difference between Eye-One Display 2 and Display LT.
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kevs
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« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2009, 05:01:05 PM »
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pro, that went over my head.
Here:
http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=789
&
http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=788

this goes over my head bit so wondering if someone in the know could tell me in laymans terms the difference
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« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2009, 11:29:56 PM »
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$83.00

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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2009, 01:27:37 AM »
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Quote from: kevs
pro, that went over my head.
Here:
http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=789
&
http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=788

this goes over my head bit so wondering if someone in the know could tell me in laymans terms the difference
I recommend you to read:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/reviews...display_lt.html
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/reviews..._display_2.html
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kevs
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« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2009, 01:59:52 PM »
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THANKS Pro, great link. Would love if someone who really knows this stuff could say if one should really get the 2 over LT and why in their own experiences.
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ChasP505
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« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2009, 04:52:18 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
Has anyone actually bought these two calibrators and tested them for comparison? Do they do the same quality job?
(I have new imac)

Never compared them using their own respective software, but using third party software I compared a puck from an EyeOne Display 2 kit and a puck from a Spyder 3 Express kit.  This was on a Windows XP computer and a Dell 2209WA monitor (NOT wide gamut).  Using ColorEyes Display Pro, I'd say subjectively that the two pucks performed equally well.  The only discernible but trivial difference is the EyeOne device measured a lower black point (0.25cd/m2 vs. 0.18cd/m2).

I don't know how they'd perform on an iMac.
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« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2009, 11:27:23 PM »
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Quote from: kevs
I have a new imac.
Before I had a Sony Artisan. So I'm used to just putting puck on, walking out of the room, coming back and it says the monitor is calibrated. Everything else is just over my head, and honestly I like it to be like that.

If this is what you're after as mentioned you could get a screen that has hardware calibration (NEC xx90 series (there's a few others as well in the NEC lineup), LaCie, Eizo, and the HP Dream Color, etc.

Now with regards to the iMac you can actually get this.

http://www.integrated-color.com

On the iMacs, MacBooks (and MBPs) as well as all Apple Cinema Displays, Color Eyes Display Pro can take control of your backlight. Profiling apps like Eye One Match and Datacolor don't have this capability and you have to adjust the backlight level manually before it profiles the screen. While what Color Eyes is doing is not exactly the same as what was going on with your Artisan (the Artisan was being calibrated by software, that is the software was directly adjusting the RGB levels on the screen itself which is a true calibration vs. an iMac which aside from the backlight level can only be profiled) for all intents and purposes the end result will be the same (with regards to the fact that you press a button, come back, and your screen will be profiled).

With regards to the puck... I have a small collection. I have an original i1, an i1v2 (which is supposed to be optimized for wide gamut displays, the i1v2 itself is not otherwise well suited for use with wide gamut displays), a DTP94, and a Spyder 3.

One of the other readers here suggests that there's some QC issues from sample to sample with the Spyder which is very possible if they're using lower grade IC components that don't have tight tolerances or precision (which makes them less expensive to manufacturing thus yielding a higher profit margin). I think I got a good copy. I'd say mine is ever so slightly better than my DTP94. When used with wide gamut displays (and the 27" iMac qualifies there) the Spyder 3 produces more consistent results than the DTP 94 which really kind of falls down a bit with wide gamut displays (especially with LED backlighting which the 27" iMac uses).

One thing you do want to do with any puck is to leave them plugged in for at least 10 minutes before you profile your screen to give the puck some time for the electronics to heat up to operating temps and stabilize (same goes for your screen although with your screen I'd recommend 45 minutes to an hour).

With regards to the iMac screen... Historically all of them have been pretty terrible however Apple may have turned over a new leaf with this one. In the past one of the biggest problems with the iMacs was that they could not be calibrated to a luminance of 110 cd/m^2, they were just WAY too bright. This new machine though can although I don't know if that's purely through a backlight adjustment or if Apple is using software to compensate via tweaking the video LUT to further bring the level down after the backlight has bottomed out... if that's the case that's not really ideal). The downside with the iMacs of course is still the glossy screen. You really need to control your environment if you're going to be using one of those screens.

If you're a full time professional I'd strongly recommend getting a decent monitor as it's the single most used piece of gear in your studio (well, one could argue that your chair gets used just as much :-) and having a really accurate screen can save you gobs of time if you ever run into some tricky issues. If you're an enthusiast then I'd say the screen is an optional thing, you can certainly get that iMac screen to work for you, it's more a question of budget and priorities.

Cheers, Joe
« Last Edit: December 25, 2009, 11:28:41 PM by shewhorn » Logged
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