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Author Topic: Impromptu "bulletin board" print display>  (Read 4218 times)
loonsailor
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« on: December 30, 2009, 01:20:33 PM »
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I'd like to have a wall in my print studio where I could put up and take down prints quickly, in order to "live with" them for a while.  Ideally, I'd love a neutral gray surface where I could stick prints for a few days to a few weeks at a time, mostly for my own viewing.  A typical cork bulletin board isn't ideal, both because of the color and because I'd rather not stick pins through the prints if I can avoid it.  I'm considering a magnetic board, though they mostly only come in white and black. I guess I could paint one, if it's too annoying.  These http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/1603...Stick-Bulletin/ charcoal PostIt boards look kind of intriguing.  Has anybody tried one with heavy rag paper?

Anybody have any great ideas?  What do you do?

Thanks.
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2009, 02:17:27 PM »
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Well, I got tired of swapping prints in the house so I purchased some LCDs and switch the images whenever I want.  It couldn't be easier
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2009, 03:28:05 PM »
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Just set thin horizontal strings or twines on a (preferably gray or white) wall, and attach your prints with clothespins.
With wooden clothespines and gray twine, it doesn't even make so much an impression of ghetto DIY display  and it's still very convenient and cheap for proof prints.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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Joe Behar
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2009, 08:10:30 PM »
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Quote from: loonsailor
I'd like to have a wall in my print studio where I could put up and take down prints quickly, in order to "live with" them for a while.  Ideally, I'd love a neutral gray surface where I could stick prints for a few days to a few weeks at a time, mostly for my own viewing.  A typical cork bulletin board isn't ideal, both because of the color and because I'd rather not stick pins through the prints if I can avoid it.  I'm considering a magnetic board, though they mostly only come in white and black. I guess I could paint one, if it's too annoying.  These http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/1603...Stick-Bulletin/ charcoal PostIt boards look kind of intriguing.  Has anybody tried one with heavy rag paper?

Anybody have any great ideas?  What do you do?

Thanks.

Try this....

http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=127
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loonsailor
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2009, 01:06:28 AM »
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I think I like the magnetic Rustoleum paint idea.  I'll give it a try.

Thanks, everyone.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2009, 11:21:12 AM »
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Idea from Ikea


http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20103587
http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20103587
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Marlyn
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2010, 12:04:38 AM »
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I use the following.

1. Large Magnetic Whiteboard.

2. Neutral Gray paper, created on an Epson 9800.   2 x 44" strips neatly fill the whiteboard.   Was done by a friend using an Epson paper which is fairly tough.  Works just fine.  (I'll find out the paper if interested).  Its the plastic one that is hard to rip.


Currently not lit at all, but I'm going to install some D50 lights in new print studio to point at it, as a poor-mans lightbox.


Regards

Mark


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loonsailor
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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2010, 10:33:50 AM »
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I bought a piece of the PostIt bulletin board material, but it's much too sticky to use for photo prints.  When I put a print on it, it is difficult to pull off without damage, and often has a curl afterwards.

I think I'm going to get a big piece of metal and paint it gray, and use bulletin board magnets to hold up prints.
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Paul Williamson
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2010, 12:07:46 PM »
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I tried the magnetic paint idea, along with some very serious magnets. These magnets are so strong that it's a struggle to get them apart, and strong enough to inflict a serious pinch injury if you're not careful enough when handling them.

The resulting painted surface is magnetic enough to hold up the magnets, but just barely. It's definitely not useful for holding up big prints on heavy paper. That's without a top coat of color to hide the deep black of the magnetic paint.

Unfortunately, the magnetic paint idea just doesn't work.
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loonsailor
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2010, 12:23:37 PM »
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Quote from: Paul Williamson
Unfortunately, the magnetic paint idea just doesn't work.

Yeah, that idea sounded great to me until I found some user reviews on the web that all came to the same conclusion you did.  Oh, well.

The magnetic pinch sounds kind of scary
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 12:24:23 PM by loonsailor » Logged
stevedickie
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« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2010, 04:18:19 PM »
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I recently picked up some magnetic boards from Ikea which are a reasonably neutral grey color as supplied:

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/10159443

The accompanying magnets ikea sells are a bit too large for my liking, but hold prints securely without being too strong or damaging the prints.  It works fine for what I use it for - just holding the prints temporarily while I decide if I like them. If I had more free wallspace I would probably have stacked a few more together but, as it is, it fits nicely over the printer:-

[attachment=19439:_MG_9821.jpg]

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Randy Carone
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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2010, 06:26:46 PM »
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Thank you for that Steve. I like the stand for your 3800/3880. Can you tell us where you got that? The drawers seem perfect for prints and unprinted paper.
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Randy Carone
stevedickie
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2010, 02:00:30 AM »
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The drawer unit is also Ikea (http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30104322) - and it's designed to hold A2 paper.  In practice the maximum size I've been able to use it for is storing A3+  because there isn't much of a margin left with A2 paper in the drawer - which makes it impossible to fit a box of A2 or to access single sheets without damaging them.  

Still, its pretty handy, holds quite a bit and is a good fit for the 3800 series of printer.  Its also supplied with castors which makes it easier to move the printer away from the wall for larger prints or accessing the rear feed.
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2010, 11:54:17 AM »
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Quote from: stevedickie
The drawer unit is also Ikea (http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30104322) - and it's designed to hold A2 paper.  In practice the maximum size I've been able to use it for is storing A3+  because there isn't much of a margin left with A2 paper in the drawer - which makes it impossible to fit a box of A2 or to access single sheets without damaging them.  

Still, its pretty handy, holds quite a bit and is a good fit for the 3800 series of printer.  Its also supplied with castors which makes it easier to move the printer away from the wall for larger prints or accessing the rear feed.
Thanks for this post!!  Went to IKEA yesterday and my 2880 is now sitting on top of the Alex unit.  Enough drawer space for the paper so it's not cluttering up my workroom.  Also there is an advantage in that the 13x19 paper lies flat and will be less prone to curl (and less  chance of head strikes).
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abiggs
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« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2010, 12:13:57 PM »
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I have a really cool display that also serves as a more permanent way of displaying prints. I will take a photo tomorrow when I am in the office.
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Andy Biggs
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« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2010, 02:04:33 PM »
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This is the IKEA hanging system:

Ikea solution



[attachment=19537:hanger_1.jpg]

[attachment=19538:hanger_2.jpg]
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Andy Biggs
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Bruce Watson
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« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2010, 03:26:27 PM »
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Quote from: GBPhoto
Homasote

Use it bare (gray color), with a frame around the edges, paint it, or wrap it in fabric.  Art/architecture schools use it a lot for crit. boards.

+1.

I covered one wall of my studio (in front of my desk where I do Photoshop work) with Homasote panels. I light it with a track holding four Solux 4700K lights. When I want to evaluate a print I tack it to the wall with pushpins. Couldn't be easier.

The wall is big enough that I've got room to let my personal prints sit -- so I can live with them for a while and evaluate them over time, another useful feature.

You can if you want paint the homasote panels. Or you can frame them for that nice finished look. It cuts easily so you can make whatever size frames you want. I do find that it's easier to evaluate prints if they are flat, so it's nice to be able to pin down all four corners. Just sayin'.

Push pins have another advantage -- you don't need to pierce the print with them. You can push the pin in just under the print and let the print "rest" on the pin; the plastic base is big enough to hold the edges down. Same thing on the upper corners. This way you don't mar a print that you might want to sell, which is a good thing too.
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loonsailor
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« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2010, 10:37:00 PM »
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I wound up doing a magnetic board, and thought I'd show a picture of it.  I bought a 4x6 ft. piece of 20 gauge steel (about $65, 30 lb.) from a local sheet metal place, and a couple of 6 ft. lengths of moulding with a rabbett (slot) pre-cut in the back from a lumber yard (<$10).  I took my x-rite color checker in to a paint store and had them match the neutral gray that I wanted, in a flat latex.  That + a spray can of metal primer was about $20.  2 coats of spray primer, 3 coats of latex and it looked pretty good.  I screwed the bottom moulding to the wall dropped the metal in to the slot, and screwed in the top moulding.  It works great, with cheap magnets from Office Max.  Letter size prints only need one magnet, 13x19 need two.  It would probably look better if I put moulding on the sides.  Also, the paint scratches very easily.  I probably should have used enamel.  The color (or lack thereof) is perfect, though.

All in all, it's a great, cheap way to look at prints.

BTW, sorry for the crummy pix - on-camera flash mixed with poor existing lighting.  Trust me, the color looks good in person.

[attachment=19657:001_jfid...122_1084.jpg][attachment=19658:002_jfid...122_1085.
jpg]
« Last Edit: January 22, 2010, 10:38:44 PM by loonsailor » Logged
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