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Author Topic: White in Prints  (Read 1761 times)
vgogolak
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« on: January 02, 2010, 05:29:01 PM »
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Michael's review of the Hanemuhle paper with magenta cast raises an interesting question about inkjet vs dye-sub and photo processes. In the latter, we have CYMK or subtractive. Inkjet is also subtractive, but in a different way; instead of the eye being given a 'resulting spectrum' at every point due to the CYMK ribbon absorption, the dots 'fool' the eye into thinking that a VERY small region has a resulting spectrum. The eye integrates and 'sees' a color from the dots.

In the Han FB paper, starting with a magenta cast we assume to 'get white" a bit of cyan and yellow would be added in that area, giving a 'SUPERLIGHT grey" rather than white (
OR the eye As we saw in the checkerboard test" will perceive white when the neighboring colors have a magenta 'uncast'
in no case do I think the profile will result in our seeing magenta in a 'clear' area.

I for one was disappointed that Michael did not continue to tell us which it was. I don't buy the 'european look" nonesense either, but I doubt that this paper will give up on white. If the brighteners REALLY brighten, more than the darkening from the YC needed to produce white perception, then Hanemuhle might have something

Or NOT!  :-)

regards
Victor
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Eugen-Florin
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2010, 09:51:38 PM »
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Any drop of added yellow and magenta, as diluted as can be, will reduce the luminosity of the white, which is generated not from the pigments, but from the paper. There is no such thing as "SUPERLIGHT grey". Grey is always a factor in reducing the light that is supposed to be reflected back to our eyes.
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vgogolak
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2010, 10:12:43 PM »
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not exactly, all 'white' paper is a little grey, that is reflects less than all the light

If most papers reflect say 90% and the Hahnemuhle (see, I learned to spell it! :-) reflects 92-3% and the extra 'tints' reduce by 1% the 'white' would still be brighter.

I think most papers reflect a lot less light than people 'perceive' and the human eye/brain perceives light and dark very different ways.

See the related thread here with the checkerboard.I think you will be amazed at how big a range the eye tolerates, and how it adjusts what is 'light' and what is 'dark'

"Brightness' on a scale of 1-100 is more often used, since paper scatters light and reflectance is difficult  to measure. Common bond is about 80, and even very bright papers without brighteners are only 90 or 92. So it is very possible the brighteners in the Han paper could more than compensate for the slight decrease in brightness due to a few 'inkdrops'
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 10:23:55 PM by vgogolak » Logged
Eugen-Florin
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2010, 09:56:43 AM »
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The gains are short lived. Optical brighteners will fade away or worst, will yellow. So the paper returned to its original state of reflectivity will show then all the shortcomings that you were fooling yourself with. Unless you don`t care about your "fine art work" in years to come. Some people see it as a business, some see it as an artistic mission.
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vgogolak
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2010, 02:19:11 PM »
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hmmm?
« Last Edit: January 04, 2010, 02:21:44 PM by vgogolak » Logged
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