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Author Topic: Canon 1200mm lens in use  (Read 3757 times)
wolfnowl
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« on: January 03, 2010, 01:11:38 AM »
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Hi Folks:  Found this video today and thought I'd add it in here.  It's pretty impressive, even if it does require it's own sherpa to carry it.  Also, I must add that I've always said I'm a photographer, not a cinematographer (that's my son's job), but seeing the video of that Flicker is very nice.

Mike.

Hands on with the Canon EF 1200 f/5.6L Lens
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feppe
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Oh this shows up in here!


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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2010, 05:28:39 AM »
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Quote from: wolfnowl
Hi Folks:  Found this video today and thought I'd add it in here.  It's pretty impressive, even if it does require it's own sherpa to carry it.  Also, I must add that I've always said I'm a photographer, not a cinematographer (that's my son's job), but seeing the video of that Flicker is very nice.

Mike.

Hands on with the Canon EF 1200 f/5.6L Lens

I've used this monster of a lens. The short video under-sells just how challenging it is to use. At 1200mm you'll need a secondary spotting scope and a spotter to have any clue what you shoot, and where to point the camera. Otherwise your shooting will consist of 90+% of looking for the subject with the viewfinder - the FOV is so narrow eyeballing it becomes an exercise in frustration. It might be easier with small subject matter which is visually separated from the background, though, such as the woodpecker in the video.

Also, the lens is very susceptible to vibration and mirror slap, and proper tripod and shooting technique are more necessary than with probably anything else out there.

It was great to see video out of the lens, haven't seen that before - looks stunning!
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2010, 01:05:50 PM »
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Quote from: feppe
I've used this monster of a lens. The short video under-sells just how challenging it is to use. At 1200mm you'll need a secondary spotting scope and a spotter to have any clue what you shoot, and where to point the camera. Otherwise your shooting will consist of 90+% of looking for the subject with the viewfinder - the FOV is so narrow eyeballing it becomes an exercise in frustration.

Yes, I was wondering about that... especially when he added the 2X converter to the lens.  With telescopes the manufacturers tend to add a sighting tube along the side and it sounds like a good idea.  It may be why they had the 500mm lens set up beside it.

Mike.
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Roger Calixto
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« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2010, 04:26:38 PM »
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HA! For those of us who dream of using the 500mm, to think of it being used as a spotting lens...

The thought kinda just messed with me. Nice video though. I was wondering how difficult it actually would be to use... your comments solved that. =)
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phila
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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2010, 02:33:54 AM »
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I've used one a couple of times. Also its FD predecessor with the built in 1.4X convertor.

It was for motorsport so panning was a tad interesting!
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Chris Pollock
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2010, 02:56:25 AM »
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I remember reading (I think on Canon Japan's web site) that Canon only manufactured these lenses when someone ordered one. Apparently they've been discontinued altogether now.
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DanielStone
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2010, 09:57:20 AM »
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check out the USED price @ B@H

sheesh. I'd rather buy a house (or two if you're in the right part of the US )

-Dan
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2010, 10:07:28 AM »
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Hmmm...  wasn't it Robert Capa who said if you can't fill the frame with a 35, you aren't close enough?
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2010, 11:24:50 AM »
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Does it come with a Sherpa to carry it, or do you have to find your own?
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2010, 07:29:25 PM »
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This lens (or its predecessor) is a standard item in cine rental houses.  It ships in a box that looks very similar to a coffin.  We used to joke that the box was for the camera assistant (focus-puller) at the end of the shoot. : )  In practice, the focus puller gives over the job to the operator.  Focus under these conditions is pretty well the camera operator's job.

Following action at this degree of magnification demands the utmost from the operator and the support equipment.  The lightweight Sachtler head shown in the video, while possibly adequate for stills, would be hopeless for motion picture work.  Once you mount a 35mm film camera to that lens, the entire package quadruples in weight compared to the DSLR shown.   A heavy Sachtler head cost over ten large in the late eighties and was worth every penny.

Even this lens pales compared to the lenses Canon provides for TV sports work.  Next baseball season, watch carefully the operators' work on the closeup center field camera.  These guys hold a chest shot on the batter from straightaway center field.  That's usually close to 400 feet away. : (
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