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Author Topic: dutch landscapes in winter  (Read 1646 times)
ljdart
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« on: January 11, 2010, 02:20:46 PM »
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Hello to everybody,

I'm almost new on this forum, this is my first post with an image. I have to admit it took some courage to post between so many excellent photographers.

One of the big challenges in Dutch landscaping has to do with the always straight horizon and the fact that the country has been squared up to a very large extent. "You could say: The skies are large around here". Anyway, some week ago we had snow and fog and there were some lovely moments. First I made a series with a lumix fz 28, but after scolding a lot on the autofocus and mf from the apparatus I went home to collect my backpack with the d 200. This was one of the first images, made with a 2.8 180mm.
After all it appeared that the lumix-images weren't bad at all. you can see the whole lot of them on http://picasaweb.google.com/bertdalmolen/M...feat=directlink

the whole series with the nikon d200 is on http://picasaweb.google.com/bertdalmolen/M...feat=directlink

Of course you are welcome to view the other albums on picasa to get an impression of my work.

all kinds to you,

ljd
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 03:15:26 PM by ljdart » Logged

PeterAit
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2010, 06:08:02 PM »
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Quote from: ljdart
Hello to everybody,

I'm almost new on this forum, this is my first post with an image. I have to admit it took some courage to post between so many excellent photographers.

One of the big challenges in Dutch landscaping has to do with the always straight horizon and the fact that the country has been squared up to a very large extent. "You could say: The skies are large around here". Anyway, some week ago we had snow and fog and there were some lovely moments. First I made a series with a lumix fz 28, but after scolding a lot on the autofocus and mf from the apparatus I went home to collect my backpack with the d 200. This was one of the first images, made with a 2.8 180mm.
After all it appeared that the lumix-images weren't bad at all. you can see the whole lot of them on http://picasaweb.google.com/bertdalmolen/M...feat=directlink

the whole series with the nikon d200 is on http://picasaweb.google.com/bertdalmolen/M...feat=directlink

Of course you are welcome to view the other albums on picasa to get an impression of my work.

all kinds to you,

ljd

Wow, that is really something! It's the best photo I have seen in quite a while (my own included, unfortunately!).
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2010, 06:48:20 PM »
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Wonderful image, quite ethereal.  I like it.

Alan
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LoisWakeman
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2010, 03:21:42 AM »
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Hi Bert,

You have some really lovely images there - we never get light, fog and frosty conditions all together where I live, so I am very envious. On the other hand, we do have hills!

I especially like the very impressionistic and minimal ones, which remind me of JMW Turner sketches. The are radiant and dreamy - a really pleasing combination to my eye.
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ljdart
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2010, 05:11:12 AM »
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Quote from: Alan Goldhammer
Wonderful image, quite ethereal.  I like it.

Alan


Thank you for the stimulating words, Alan. I loved visiting your site and see your work and the project of following the river. That is fun and a real photographers work: documenting.
One of the famous dutch photographers Frans Lanting once said that photography is not about traveling far, but about your vision. He learned his basic skills around his house and the park near his city-home.
Most of my images are made in the direct surroundings where I live. I'm lucky, I live on the borders of a small nature-reserve and we have a wonderfull garden. And the challenge of the Dutch squares and horizons made me find ways to deal with it. I have to admit that it took years. And only because of the digital revolution I could go full throttle on developing the vision.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2010, 05:36:28 AM by ljdart » Logged

ljdart
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2010, 05:25:57 AM »
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Quote from: LoisWakeman
Hi Bert,

You have some really lovely images there - we never get light, fog and frosty conditions all together where I live, so I am very envious. On the other hand, we do have hills!

I especially like the very impressionistic and minimal ones, which remind me of JMW Turner sketches. The are radiant and dreamy - a really pleasing combination to my eye.

Hello Lois Wakeman, Thank you for the compliment. I hope I can live up to a standart like that, I try anyway but seldom succeed. Your and Alan's reception stimulate me to put some more things on this site.

I think the Gulfstream is heating up Devon to much to let those things come together. At the other hand, the moors do have a spectacular climate for photographers and Wales isn't to far for some good frost and fog.  

By the way, it is presumed that the wintery conditions in W-Europe are caused by a 30% deminishing of the flow of the Gulfstream. Neither we are used to weather like this, much to continetal.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2010, 05:39:37 AM by ljdart » Logged

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