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Author Topic: Hawaii locations  (Read 2821 times)
Lisa Nikodym
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« on: August 03, 2005, 10:43:55 AM »
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It will be hard to not feel like a tourist in Hawaii, since so many of the people you'll see are tourists too.  It's just crawling with them almost anywhere you go.  :p

The west coast (where the big beach resorts are) isn't very photogenic - very dry.  The good photography (at least in the classical "picture postcard" sense) will mostly be on the east side.  There are a couple of very pretty waterfalls in the Hilo area (Akaka Falls & Rainbow Falls), and some interesting botanical gardens and the like with tropical plants and flowers (again, it's been awhile since I've been there, but I think they were mostly in the Hilo area), and Hawaii Volcanos National Park has interesting volcanic features.  If there are currently any active lava flows that can be seen from a road or from a helicopter tour, that can be very interesting (though perhaps more for the eye than for the camera), though you might need to be pretty lucky for that to be the case.

Lisa
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Henry W
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« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2005, 10:14:09 PM »
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The 2 major jewels on the big island (imho) are the two Mauna volcanos and the crown jewel, the lave flow of the Kilauea volcano.
There is a great website here:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/main.html
Hope that helps.
Henry
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wheatcraft
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2005, 11:26:14 AM »
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If you want to get away from the typical Hawaiian stereotype landscapes, go up into the Paniolo country (Paniolo is Hawaiian for cowboy). This is the saddle area between the the Kohala Mts and Mauna Kea (hiway 190 & 201, Waimea is nearest town). This area has rolling hills, tall grasses and ranches, reminds me of the Kentucky Blue Grass country. The photo ops in this region are terrific, and very "un-Hawaiian".

Steve Wheatcraft
www.stephenwheatcraft.com
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Curt
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« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2005, 07:30:56 PM »
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We are going to Hawaii (big island) for the first time. And we plan go from snorkeling to a 13000' mountain in our ten days there. We have a excellent book Hawaii Revealed for starters. However I am looking for a photographer's perspective on stuff to see & what to avoid.
I am interested in all from small plants to waterfalls & lava flows.
And also is a telephoto lens(300mm) useful or is a 105 micro enough lens?
Thanks!
www.pbase.com/cwphoto
My Webpage
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framah
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2005, 11:58:08 AM »
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You might consider getting Topo maps of the island so you can see hiking trails all over the island along with elevations.  Once, a long time ago, I was going to go to Kaui (sp?) and hike around so I got the maps. Ended up going to the southwest on the mainland instead.  

I might warn you about wandering too far inland and into  remote areas as you might run into people guarding their pot fields and they aren't a cheery, forgiving bunch if you know what I mean.
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"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
russell a
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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2005, 08:41:20 PM »
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I take from your posting that you wish to avoid taking the pictures that everyone else takes.  If you are sure this is your goal, well then, just don't!  To paraphrase the immortal words of Alexy Brodovitch (influential art director in the 40's and 50's, photography instructor, and mentor to many photographers). "when you look through the viewfinder, if you see a photo you've seen before, DON'T TAKE IT".  

You need to ask yourself if you are going on a vacation or a photo outing.  Vacations, in my opinion, are the enemy of good photography. The problems include adequate time and the degree of (mental) focus possible.  Vacationing represents different priorities, not the least of which is the needs of others on the trip, who may not want to spend their time 1) off the beaten path ("where no tourist has gone before" - good luck on that). 2) functioning as a photo assistant, with long boring intervals of waiting between set-ups and shots*, punctuated by carrying a tripod or a kitbag to the next location, 3) missing out on the archetypal experiences that "real tourists" back home will point out was the highlight of THEIR trip.

And really,do you want to experience your trip through the narrow focus of your viewfinder?  

I am sure there will be numerous postings in reply by those who claim that they can do both successfully.  And, anyone can luck out and get some shots along the way.  But, vacations are vacations and serious photo excursions are different.  It almost always takes time to peel back the layers of cliche and get beyond the obvious.  Numerous photographers' work taken in their native environs is significantly superior to their work in places foreign to them.  How many repeat trips to their subject matter did your photo heros make?   One might be best served by adjusting one's expectations either on the photographic side or the vacation side.

Just food for thought.  Having your priorities straight will be useful.  And, certainly, good luck.



* (don't forget to bracket, change angles of attack, lenses - whatever - it's a long trip for a re-shoot)
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