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Author Topic: are you right or left eyed?  (Read 10617 times)
Ray
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« Reply #40 on: January 25, 2010, 03:27:57 AM »
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Quote from: Morgan_Moore
MOST important it made me understand that my Right Eye Clients may be visually dumb - they just dont perceive the lamp post growing out of the head of the subject - they are too busy remembering peoples names, knowing left from right and being able to spell !

I'm right-eyed, but I've always appreciated the absurdity of a lamp post growing out of the head of a subject, just as I've always appreciated the absurdity of the subject being out of focus whilst the tree behind is in focus.

But I've had the advantage of having a father who was an amateur photographer.
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BenjaminKanarek
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« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2010, 12:32:49 PM »
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Quote from: sperera
so Ive heard people talk about being right or left eyed but havent come across any studies or conclusions or anything.......

Me.....I'm right-handed and I'm left-eyed....completely....its not like i do both eyes....I'm SOLELY left-eyed when composing and taking pics.....I wonder why?Huh any ideas?Huh??

I am right handed and right eye.  I have tried left eye on occasion and just couldn't come to grips with how I viewed reality form that perspective.
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lowep
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« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2010, 02:09:31 PM »
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Clients may be visually dumb - regardless of what eye they use; I also encounter this problem and have not yet found a good way around it - other than to look for another client. What erks me most is when the visually dumb clients assume they are RIGHT (eyed or not) and my best work is LEFT (eyed or not too) out...

I really admire the work of blind photographers like these guys who are neither right or left eyed
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John R
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« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2010, 03:15:01 PM »
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I'm a cyclops and my eye still hurts from the time the photographer in front of me turned around with a tripod on his shoulder, just tell me how wonderful it is that we are able to take images of a three dimensional world and place them on two dimensional flat pieces of paper!

JMR
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 03:20:47 PM by John R » Logged
Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2010, 01:52:25 AM »
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Quote from: lowep
Clients may be visually dumb - regardless of what eye they use; I also encounter this problem and have not yet found a good way around it - other than to look for another client. What erks me most is when the visually dumb clients assume they are RIGHT (eyed or not) and my best work is LEFT (eyed or not too) out...


What the guy I was photographing was saying..

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Enhancing-Self-est...e/dp/1412921112

Was that 'left eyes' are more spatially aware while having other 'limitations' such as slow time to identify left and right and often poor reading

He also said that most people are somewhere in the middle of course

But he introduced me to the concept that I (as a left eye) may have a tendency to see in a more developed manner  (being able to understand the positional elements in a scene fast) than others ability to do the same -  and to account for that in my interaction with them

Those other people of course may have other attributes that outstrip mine - mental arithmetic, ability to compose wonderful prose etc

He was completely serious

If you think about it there are often artistic differences between writers and photographers - probably the writer has other attributes that lead them to their career seeing more in terms of 'concepts' rather then 'trivial' details like lampposts or angle of light

Of course when writing about a scene the lamp post does not matter - where as in a photos it will be critical

Overall his theory is that most people a great at something - its just discovering where that greatness lies - it the core of his approach to dealing with 'special needs' kids

Its a classic - take a client to a beach at midday on a sunny blue day - they see a wonderful scene - I see a challenging situation in terms of dynamic range nasty shadows etc and just want to come bak at magic hour

S
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 01:59:16 AM by Morgan_Moore » Logged

Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
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Ray
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« Reply #45 on: January 27, 2010, 02:25:53 AM »
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Quote from: Morgan_Moore
One of the most interesting jobs I have ever done was photograph a man who writes books on dyslexia

he see this not a problem but a difference - the brain is doing other stuff he reckons- sometimes useful sometimes not

--

I put the camera to my left eye to take his picture and he said..

You will are probably a  great photographer - LE is good spatial awareness

you probably dont know left from right

and you probably cant remember my name - the left brain has other business

The second and third where true - dont know about the first

--

MOST important it made me understand that my Right Eye Clients may be visually dumb - they just dont perceive the lamp post growing out of the head of the subject - they are too busy remembering peoples names, knowing left from right and being able to spell !

This could explain some 'debates' on set that I have had

S
 

There's something intriguing about these concepts which I can relate to. I'm right-eyed but I have no difficulty recognising the absurdity of lamposts emanating from the subject's head.

Nevertheless, I frequently have trouble remembering people's names on first meeting them. Is it because my right brain (left eye) is busy with artistic or moral issues (in what way is the person beautiful, photographable, reliable, honest and trustworthy etc) and that their name, which has nothing to do with such considerations, is of lower priority, therefore, unless I make a special effort to remember it, devising a nemonic for example, I frequently forget the name?

I wonder. I'll consider experimenting with left-eyed photography in the future, when I'm in picture-taking mode.
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Ray
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« Reply #46 on: January 27, 2010, 02:35:44 AM »
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Quote from: Morgan_Moore
If you think about it there are often artistic differences between writers and photographers - probably the writer has other attributes that lead them to their career seeing more in terms of 'concepts' rather then 'trivial' details like lampposts or angle of light

I think you'll find that writers, the best writers, sometimes obsess about a particular phrase, or sentence, the order of the words and the puntuation, rewritung a sentence many times until it feels just right and expresses what they are trying to say.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 02:37:29 AM by Ray » Logged
Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #47 on: January 27, 2010, 03:12:31 AM »
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Quote from: Ray
I wonder. I'll consider experimenting with left-eyed photography in the future, when I'm in picture-taking mode.

That wont work - it how you are wired, but the name remembering, etc all correlates as do 6000+ forum posts to a certain way of thinking that is a little different from the majority of the population

Such thinking is not good or bad, often correlates with good photography and happens more with left eyes

(said my 'expert')

The important thing is to understand and account for the potential difference in thinking style between you and those around you - especially if they are the one with the cheque book

 S
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Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
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RobReuthal
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« Reply #48 on: January 27, 2010, 03:55:08 AM »
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Right Hand, left eye, and my nose allways on the display    
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 03:56:45 AM by RobReuthal » Logged
lowep
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« Reply #49 on: January 27, 2010, 07:21:30 AM »
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... account for the potential difference in thinking style...

do you mean:

work together with the client as a supportive team player to produce affirmative images that satisfy the client's expectations at the same time as your own personal aspirations...

ie start to believe what people say on television?
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 07:36:08 AM by lowep » Logged
Ray
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« Reply #50 on: January 27, 2010, 04:34:17 PM »
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Quote from: Morgan_Moore
That wont work - it how you are wired, but the name remembering, etc all correlates as do 6000+ forum posts to a certain way of thinking that is a little different from the majority of the population

Such thinking is not good or bad, often correlates with good photography and happens more with left eyes

(said my 'expert')

Nevertheless, it might be interesting to try the other eye to see if one can find any distinguishing features that might differentiate a left-eyed photo from a right-eyed photo. The brain has a capacity to rewire itself. It happens when people are recovering from strokes.

Having recently fractured my right wrist, I'm very well aware how lousy my left-handed writing looks. I can't believe a left-eyed photo would look as bad   .
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 04:35:02 PM by Ray » Logged
Paul Sumi
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« Reply #51 on: January 27, 2010, 07:36:48 PM »
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Quote from: RobReuthal
Right Hand, left eye, and my nose allways on the display    

+1!

Paul
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Ray
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« Reply #52 on: January 28, 2010, 02:46:27 AM »
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Quote from: Paul Sumi
+1!

Paul

I see. A bit awkward really, isn't it. I presume that's preferable to having your nose inadvertently change the controls on the right side of the camera body   .
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RobReuthal
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« Reply #53 on: January 28, 2010, 02:55:07 AM »
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Ive a small long tube fixed with powerclue on my viewfinder, so is the distance far enough between nose and display.    
« Last Edit: January 28, 2010, 03:02:14 AM by RobReuthal » Logged
ClaireT
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« Reply #54 on: January 28, 2010, 05:20:29 AM »
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Quote from: RobReuthal
Ive a small long tube fixed with powerclue on my viewfinder, so is the distance far enough between nose and display.    


My first camera had a viwefinder on the left-hand side, so now I always look through my left eye whilst shooting. As a consquence I always have to carry a tissue in my kit bag to wipe the noseprint from the back of my camera.
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lowep
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« Reply #55 on: January 28, 2010, 04:35:59 PM »
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Quote from: ClaireT
My first camera had a viwefinder on the left-hand side, so now I always look through my left eye whilst shooting. As a consquence I always have to carry a tissue in my kit bag to wipe the noseprint from the back of my camera.

maybe a solution for those of us who encounter this problem could be to hold the camera upside down -- though I haven't tried it myself yet
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Paul Sumi
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« Reply #56 on: January 28, 2010, 05:46:38 PM »
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Quote from: lowep
maybe a solution for those of us who encounter this problem could be to hold the camera upside down -- though I haven't tried it myself yet

A bit awkward to press the shutter release...  

Paul
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lowep
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« Reply #57 on: January 30, 2010, 04:04:34 PM »
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Quote from: Paul Sumi
A bit awkward to press the shutter release...  

Paul

you could use your toe
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Ray
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« Reply #58 on: January 30, 2010, 11:08:11 PM »
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Quote from: lowep
you could use your toe

What's the matter with you guys! Are you just being silly?

No need to use your toe. I just stepped outside my house and took a shot of my immaculate lawn, with camera upside-down, left eye fixed to the viewfinder, nose completely unencumbered, and left thumb on the shutter.

No worries!, as they say in Australia. Beautiful shot, including the mango tree as well.

[attachment=19882:lawn.jpg]
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #59 on: January 31, 2010, 08:06:59 AM »
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And for the benefit of those who never viewed an image on a view camera's ground glass, there's an easy way to invert the resulting image. Just stand on your head while holding the camera upside down, which will make it right side up to the rest of the world. Except, of course, in Oz, where you will have to ...  

Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
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