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Author Topic: Policies on 32-64bit software conversion?  (Read 6715 times)
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2010, 12:33:48 PM »
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Thanks to all of you who contributed to this thread.

As a result, I've been able to discover that my Dell can, indeed, go from its current 4G memory to 8G, enough to make Win 7/64 worth doing. I've got the memory and the w7 upgrade (from Vista), and I've Acronis to clone my current C-drive onto a new 1TB WD black drive, which will eventually be the new C-drive.

Next, I'll swap the old C for the new one and test, then add the new ram and test again. If all is well at that point, I'll back up everything that isn't already backed up (very little) and try the Win 7 upgrade. The additional memory should help CS4/32 a good bit, I expect.

Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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walter.sk
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« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2010, 04:01:31 PM »
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Quote from: mmurph
Just to clarify quickly: You need to do a **clean install** on a new (or reused) drive to go from XP to Win 7. Because of the "large jump" you can't just "upgrade" the existing install.

That is probably best anyway from a performance standpoint. I don't want to derail your thread more, I'll leave it at that for  right now (on my phone too.)  

Sounds like you are mostly on track though.

Thanks Phil!

Cheers,
Michael
Thanks for the heads up.  I was planning to do a clean install.
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nemophoto
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« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2010, 11:51:28 AM »
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Actually, you DO NOT need to do a clean install. The most effortless way to upgrade your computer and operating system is PCMover from Laplink. About a month ago, I transferred everything from my old Vista 32 computer to a brand new Cyberpower PC with Win7 x64 effortlessly. It was the easiest and simplest upgrade I have done in years.

I do, however, HIGHLY recommend you build/buy a new system. The equipment you have for Win XP will not do Win 7 x64 justice.

That said, back to your original question, most of my programs are still x86 programs and have no problems. At this point, only Lightroom is 64-bit. However, all Adobe programs come with both 32- and -64 bit so you can choose your installation.

Look into PCMover. It's really worth the price, and actually works as promised.

Nemo
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JohnMoss
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« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2010, 01:29:10 PM »
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Hello Walter.sk,

Just as an FYI, as many folks in the forum have given you good advice. Here is what you should know about the differences:
Here is a bit of info to understand the issues with 32-bit and 64-bit OS upgrades and later options that may or may not be available to you later:

When upgrading from Windows Vista to Windows 7 you must upgrade the version currently installed within Windows Vista to the corresponding version in Windows 7. I.E. Windows Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 Home Premium; Windows Vista Business to Windows 7 Professional; and Windows Vista Ultimate to Windows 7 Ultimate.  

Additionally, you will not be able to "upgrade" from a 32-bit version of Windows 7 to 64-bit -- the architecture between the two is too drastically different to allow such a change. Upgrading from a 32-bit operating system to 64-bit will require a custom install. To learn more about the differences between a 32-bit operating system and 64-bit please go to the following link: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows...asked-questions

Lastly,Microsoft does have an official Windows 7 Support Forum specifically for IT Pros located here http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums...tegory/w7itpro/ . It is supported by product specialists as well as engineers and support teams. You may want to also check the threads available there for additional assistance and feedback.

John M
Microsoft Windows Client Team
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walter.sk
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« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2010, 02:56:42 PM »
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Quote from: JohnMoss
Hello Walter.sk,

Just as an FYI, as many folks in the forum have given you good advice. Here is what you should know about the differences:
Here is a bit of info to understand the issues with 32-bit and 64-bit OS upgrades and later options that may or may not be available to you later:

When upgrading from Windows Vista to Windows 7 you must upgrade the version currently installed within Windows Vista to the corresponding version in Windows 7. I.E. Windows Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 Home Premium; Windows Vista Business to Windows 7 Professional; and Windows Vista Ultimate to Windows 7 Ultimate.  

Additionally, you will not be able to "upgrade" from a 32-bit version of Windows 7 to 64-bit -- the architecture between the two is too drastically different to allow such a change. Upgrading from a 32-bit operating system to 64-bit will require a custom install. To learn more about the differences between a 32-bit operating system and 64-bit please go to the following link: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows...asked-questions

Lastly,Microsoft does have an official Windows 7 Support Forum specifically for IT Pros located here http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums...tegory/w7itpro/ . It is supported by product specialists as well as engineers and support teams. You may want to also check the threads available there for additional assistance and feedback.

John M
Microsoft Windows Client Team
Thanks for the information.  I have already muddled through the MS website about 32- vs 64-bit Windows 7, and "upgrading" from 32=bit XP.  I also ran the Windows 7 upgrade advisor and found that my hardware is suitable for the 64-bit Windows 7.  Here is what I now understand, and the steps I'm taking:

1) I now have the Upgrade version of Windows 7 Ultimate, and will do a "clean" install of Windows 7 64-bit.
2) I made a regular backup of my C: drive and am currently in the process of making a bootable clone of that drive onto an external drive, "just in case."
3)When that finishes I will do my install of Win7 on the my C: drive and begin the process of installing those drivers that are newer than those I had been using, and wherever there are drivers for 64-bit available.
4) I will then upgrade my memory to 8GB.
5) I will reinstall my applications, downloading 64-bit versions where available.

I do believe I have done what I need to survive this.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2010, 05:20:39 PM »
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Quote from: nemophoto
Look into PCMover. It's really worth the price, and actually works as promised.
Nemo
Nemo:

I checked out the PCMover website, and also had a "chat" with one of their staff. I was told that I need to get PCMoverPro,  which is $60, which apparently has PCMover Upgrade Adviser in it, which would let me do the Win7 64Bit install and then have my old programs and settings migrate to Win7.

I have a number of external USB drives with picture files on them, as well as a 2nd internal HD for picture data and a 3rd internal HD to back up the picture data.  Will these be readable from the new Windows 7 drive?

Also what precautions do I need to take?  What happens with all of my actions and plugins for Photoshop?  What else do I need to know?

Do I sound nervous about this?  Nervous doesn't even begin to describe what I feel...

As far as buying or building a new computer, I can't at this point.  Mine is only a little over a year old, and the budget got busted on purchases of a 30" monitor and a couple of lenses.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2010, 05:23:39 PM by walter.sk » Logged
Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2010, 12:05:48 AM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I have a number of external USB drives with picture files on them, as well as a 2nd internal HD for picture data and a 3rd internal HD to back up the picture data.  Will these be readable from the new Windows 7 drive?

Yes. Windows 7 uses NTFS ust like every version of Windows since 2000.

Quote
Also what precautions do I need to take?  What happens with all of my actions and plugins for Photoshop?

If you buy a new hard drive and install Windows 7 on the new drive (after copying your old drive to the new drive to make sure the "upgrade" will work), there is very little risk. If anything goes wrong, simply remove the new drive and reinstall the old one.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2010, 08:11:01 AM »
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Quote from: Jonathan Wienke
Yes. Windows 7 uses NTFS ust like every version of Windows since 2000.

If you buy a new hard drive and install Windows 7 on the new drive (after copying your old drive to the new drive to make sure the "upgrade" will work), there is very little risk. If anything goes wrong, simply remove the new drive and reinstall the old one.

Thanks, Jonathan.  I guess the new hard drive is the best security.  That's what I'll do.
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