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Author Topic: Mailing pictures in tubes.  (Read 2262 times)
Bill Koenig
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« on: February 10, 2010, 02:07:54 PM »
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A friend sent me a file and wants me to print it 13x19 and mail it to her. She plans to have it matted and framed. I'm printing it on Epson Luster on my 3800.
As most of you that have handled this paper know, it pretty fragile and can kink quite easily.
I've never done this before, but my plan is to mail it in a tube, but once I roll it up and stick it in a tube, isn't it going to unravel in the tube and stick to the sides of the tube. Getting it back out, and not damaging the print might not be that easy, or is it?
I'm probably making a big deal out of nothing, but before I try this, I would like a little feed back on how to do this correctly.
Thanks for any help.
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Bill Koenig,
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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2010, 02:25:30 PM »
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A layer of paper between the print & the tube?
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michael a
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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2010, 03:02:14 PM »
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This is pretty easy:

(1) use a large diameter tube.  Prints have to be wound too tightly in a small diameter tube.  Large diameter tubes are hard to find in local stores.  I order mine from U-Line.

(2)  As suggested above, put a sheet of soft paper, like tracing paper, on the print.  

(3)  Yes, the print will unravel in the tube, making it impossible to remove.  Just roll it up to a slightly smaller diameter than the inner diameter of the tube.  Wrap it in a piece of paper and tape that shut to stop it from unraveling.  Now it will slide in and out of the tube with no problems
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 03:02:36 PM by michael a » Logged
Ken
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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2010, 03:31:09 PM »
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I agree with Michael's recommendations. (I presume you have already coated it with one of the protective sprays before you even think about handling it for a tube.) I always roll the paper image-side-in, and I don't roll it smaller than the inside tube diameter. True, that makes it harder to get out of the tube, but I feel that less movement during shipping, the better. Also, I trim the tube length so that the print has little opportunity to move. Then I stuff a couple of those air-filled plastic bladder packing material into the void at the center of the rolled-up print. Yazoo Mills' heavy duty mailing tubes are part Howitzer cannons. (http://www.yazoomills.com/mailing-tubes.aspx).
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agavephoto
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« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2010, 04:08:07 PM »
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I've also used the heavy duty mailing tuves from Yazoo Mills with great success. I put a piece of archival tissue over the actual print to help with any possible scuffing/scratching.



Quote from: Ken
I agree with Michael's recommendations. (I presume you have already coated it with one of the protective sprays before you even think about handling it for a tube.) I always roll the paper image-side-in, and I don't roll it smaller than the inside tube diameter. True, that makes it harder to get out of the tube, but I feel that less movement during shipping, the better. Also, I trim the tube length so that the print has little opportunity to move. Then I stuff a couple of those air-filled plastic bladder packing material into the void at the center of the rolled-up print. Yazoo Mills' heavy duty mailing tubes are part Howitzer cannons. (http://www.yazoomills.com/mailing-tubes.aspx).
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JohnBrew
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« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2010, 04:09:27 PM »
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I do this all the time. I slip the image into a plastic sleeve before I ship. The greatest chance for damage is when the customer opens the tube. I always put an arrow on the tube saying 'open this end' and I make certain the image is biased inside the sleeve towards the opposite end.
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 04:45:11 PM »
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I will echo with what everyone else has noted.  I have sent out numerous 13x19 prints in 4 inch Uline mail tubes.  This is a nice size tube to use and you don't have to roll the print up as tightly as with a 3 inch tube.  I roll the print so that the image is on the inside with a archival paper over the face of the print so that it's just slightly smaller than the tube diameter and tape a sheet of paper containing the print information and directions for framing around the print to keep it secure.  I put pieces of wadded paper at both ends of the tube so the print is held firmly (you could use excess bubble paper just as well).  This way it doesn't matter which end the customer opens and the print drops right out.  You can send the prints out via priority mail pretty cheaply and establish an account with the US Postal Service print out your mail labels on line (we also have personal UPS accounts through work but UPS runs about 75 cents more per package).  The Postal Service sends you an e-mail with the tracking number so you can see when it's delivered.  I've always had delivery within three days.  I also purchase the side loading packing list envelopes from Uline for putting the mail label into and then sticking this on the mail tube.  I've not had any complaints of prints being scuffed or scratched this way and I've shipped both matte and glossy prints.  You can go the extra step of getting polypropylene sleeves if you are concerned about the print surface (they are slightly more expensive than archival paper).

Hope this helps.
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BobShram
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« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2010, 06:12:44 PM »
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I use 4" pvc pipe from Home Depot, the thin type that goes under ground, has a white outer with a black felt type linning (makes it easyer to remove photo). They can be cut to size, I use a chop saw.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 06:20:47 PM by BobShram » Logged
artobest
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2010, 04:39:34 AM »
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I never roll the print with the image side facing inwards. Guess it's a hangover of dealing with artworks, you always roll with the painted side on the outside to prevent the paint deforming (particularly with oils and acrylics). Also, rolling with the image on the outside works with, rather than against, the inherent curl of the (roll) paper.
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