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Author Topic: That dog  (Read 6652 times)
fredjeang
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« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2010, 12:43:11 PM »
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Quote from: mtomalty
 
« Last Edit: February 22, 2010, 06:03:05 PM by fredjeang » Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2010, 01:40:11 PM »
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Quote from: Robert Roaldi
Wow, heavy stuff. Thank god it wasn't a cat.

Maybe it's time to turn this thread into another all-out Fanboy Flame war -- between the Kitty lovers and the Poochophiles.
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Rob C
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2010, 03:46:34 AM »
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Quote from: Rocco Penny
Friend;
You are my new Champion!
A trailblazer with a not so common flair for the maudlin!
A bleak and threatened view of the temporal
AND
spiritual.
Well, you sir
land squarely in the center of the least of my tempestuous moments!
It would be hard to find interesting people in this world if there were no adversity...
ell not to bring too fine a point to it,
but I'll read all your posts from now on
Have a nice day
Rocco




Mama mia - now a sense of responsibility heaped on top of everything else!

Ciao

Rob C
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schrodingerscat
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« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2010, 10:42:48 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
So that's what it means to think of life as a dog, then?

I think Velasquez is the wrong painter - maybe Goya's Black Paintings are closer to the truth?

Life as a journey is a strange sort of metaphor - it is often applied but seems oddly inappropriate somehow: a journey is supposed to be the route to somewhere, but life doesn't really take you anywhere at all; regardless of successes or failures, you end up in the same damn place, in your head at least, from whence you thought you'd set off on that wonderful trip. The problem is both mechanical and spiritual: your genes make you what you are and all the experiences in the world can't honestly change that. I have had personal experiences from a very young age that I wouldn't even recount here, anywhere in fact where I'm not personally known, because I would be written off as a romancer, a fibber of the first waters.

But where did any of it lead? I'm still me and the highs are now long gone; excitement was certainly enjoyable in youth but now would probably prove fatal; belief in a rosier tomorrow gets washed out of the system if only because of the unavoidable lessons of experience. I remember a time when one could depend on over 15% tax-free interest offshore - now, all you get is a hole in your capital and ever increasing bills. And no, it isn't a matter of life on any breadline - yet! - but something far more destructive. Think of your own history: how do you think you might feel if you come to realise you are the last of a certain section of a family's  generations, that there is nobody left alive with whom you can talk about things that happened in your youth; people who know the same people, songs and movies...? That's not to say there are not others much older around, simply that they are not part of a personal landscape of references. This could be taken as a huge dollop of introspective shmaltz, which it might be, but it is the truth nonetheless. Far from being on any journey I think we are all in a private little capsule which holds all of our references and experiences, dreams and fears. We bob about on a sea of random currents and imagine we are actually in control! The thing is, that little capsule contains everything you have in life, and as it decays from within there is no lifeboat able to come out and tow you away to your safe-haven.

But at least the dog doesn't know this - I hope!

;-)

Rob C

The dog doesn't know, nor does it care. The journey is the destination and more fun with your head out the window.
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Rob C
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« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2010, 04:01:56 PM »
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Quote from: schrodingerscat
The dog doesn't know, nor does it care. The journey is the destination and more fun with your head out the window.




This is all true, except that when you go into the tunnel you always get coal in your eye. It's a bitch... or a dog - I'm no expert at this distance.

Rob C
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fredjeang
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« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2010, 01:38:50 AM »
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Quote from: schrodingerscat
The dog doesn't know, nor does it care. The journey is the destination and more fun with your head out the window.
Yes, we are in the Tao now
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2010, 09:16:46 AM »
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Quote from: fredjeang
Yes, we are in the Tao now
"The Tao of Cat is manyfold mightier than the Tao of Dog."

--Anonymous 3rd century Master.  


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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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fredjeang
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« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2010, 09:42:24 AM »
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It seems that we have some enlightened masters here in the Luminous Landscape  
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Philmar
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« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2010, 12:46:44 PM »
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Quote from: michael
I always travel with life-sized stuffed dogs of different breeds, and position them strategically in my photographs.

Everyone knows that.

Michael

Well, I see no reason to doubt you.
I photographed that very bar last October. There was definitely no dog on the adjoining roof that day, or the next! Do yourself a favour Michael and have a drink inside - but after 5 PM. What a hoot.
You are lucky to be there for such an extended stay. Sadly I was only in San Miguel and the nearby city of Guanajuato for 4 short days. Both are incredible locations for a photographic journey.

http://www.fluidr.com/photos/phil_marion/s...157622470811739

Make sure you walk around as much as possible because you'll need to work off all the great food you'll eat. San Miguel has an incredible number of great (but somewhat pricey) restaurants for a city of that size. It has many bars like the one in your photo - seedy bars that look like a typical old fashioned western saloons, swinging doors, long bar.....cheap booze.

Someone told me the presence of the swinging doors meant that women were not allowed. I never thought to verify this.

So jealous, as we sit here in Toronto under a foot of fresh snow.
Keep living the dream, Michael.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2010, 01:08:11 PM by Philmar » Logged

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schrodingerscat
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« Reply #29 on: February 27, 2010, 12:05:38 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
This is all true, except that when you go into the tunnel you always get coal in your eye. It's a bitch... or a dog - I'm no expert at this distance.

Rob C


Hi Rob -

Yep, and the longer one hangs out on this plane the likelier the lumps of coal. When life hands you lemons, forget the lemonade and make pies. Then toss 'em in the face of adversity. Like cats, nothing irritates the gods more than being laughed at.

DG

PS - Back to the subject. Mexico is one of those Decisive Moment hotspots, perfect for just wondering around with a camera. In the old days used to carry a Polaroid as well to give subjects a photo of themselves. Excellent icebreaker.
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Philmar
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« Reply #30 on: April 14, 2010, 10:58:31 AM »
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Quote from: schrodingerscat
PS - Back to the subject. Mexico is one of those Decisive Moment hotspots, perfect for just wondering around with a camera.

Agree 100% - I was rather pleased with the opportunities I saw in my short week. I would still rate Cuba slightly higher  - thanks to the absence of commercialism, advertising and presence of mass media....plus the 50's cars don't hurt.

Michael - will you be posting more shots from San Miguel - as mentioned in my previous post above I was there for only 2 days and was taken aback by the numerous opportunities for photos.
Here's a gallery of the ones I took on my 48 hours there:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/phil_mari...57622470811739/

I really am looking forward to seeing more of your photos Michael - hopefully online...PLEASE don't make me take the subway to see them.
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An office drone pension administrator by day and a photo-enthusiast by night, week-end and on vacation who carries his camera when traveling the world:
Please have a chew on my photos:
http://www.fluidr.com/photos/phil_marion/sets
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