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Author Topic: When or when not to vignette...  (Read 4990 times)
KencoGoldACHLandscapes
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« on: February 26, 2010, 06:38:43 AM »
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Hi all!

First of all thank you for having me, this is my first post and it happens to be a question!  

So i created this website for a friend that does garden landscaping and obviously not being very good at photography I had to post edit some of his photos to make them look a little better, nothing special just cropping brightness contrast that sort of thing.

I did however come across an effect that astonished me ... vignette. Wow what a difference and dramatic effect it has on a photograph but and here in lies the question not on all photographs seemed to fit well.

Take for example this gallery of photos: Landscaper Garden Ideas [a href=\"http://www.achlandscapes.co.uk/garden-ideas.htm\" target=\"_blank\"]http://www.achlandscapes.co.uk/garden-ideas.htm[/a]

The first image or portfolio image was a color image cropped and a vignette added to try and bring focus onto the pond - it looked crap to say the least but the moment I desaturated the image to black and white it looked really good.

The second example is second from the left , this photo was scanned in, fixed up and then vignetted - a huge difference to say the least.

Then thirdly of all the other photos vignette just did not seem to fit right.

So I guess my question is , is there a theory or a rule of thumb per say on when to or when not to vignette ...

Thank you so much , I have already used a lot of tips from around the forums !
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2010, 07:09:40 AM »
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Quote from: KencoGoldACHLandscapes
So I guess my question is , is there a theory or a rule of thumb per say on when to or when not to vignette ...

Whatever looks good to you!

I'm not aware of any vignetting theory ... but I'm sure someone has one!

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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2010, 10:20:16 AM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
Whatever looks good to you!

I'm not aware of any vignetting theory ... but I'm sure someone has one!
I agree with Jeremy.

Vignetting is a tool that should probably be used sparingly. If you look at one of your images and say, "Maybe vignetting will help this," then go ahead and try it. Speculating, I'd say that a photo that invites attention on the center of the image might be a good candidate, or one that has lots of near white at the edges which is intended to be printed and matted on white mat board. But it's really a matter of personal taste.


Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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k bennett
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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2010, 01:12:51 PM »
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I tend to use the Vignette tool in Camera Raw on many, if not most, of my images. I am, of course, *adding* the vignette, which I suppose is the opposite of the intended use for fixing lens problems. I shoot people, mostly, and in the darkroom I would burn down the corners of many or most images, and the vignette tool lets me do that with little effort.
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2010, 08:48:28 PM »
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I agree with Eric - it's a tool and should be used as such, but if it's overused, then it becomes schtick.  You get to decide.

Mike.

P.S.  If you're using Lightroom and you want to give your image an old-fashioned snapshot look, use the following settings:

[attachment=20536:Vignette.jpg]

Mike.
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KencoGoldACHLandscapes
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2010, 05:50:28 AM »
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Thank you for taking the time to reply to my question, looking at it now it might have been a bit ambigous thinking that there is a cold calculated way to  achieve something so good.

What I guess I was hoping for was that by just looking at an photograph I would be able to say if a vignette would add to overall effect.

Thank you very much - I think I should just keep experimenting which is probably always best !

Cheers
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2010, 07:21:42 AM »
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Quote from: KencoGoldACHLandscapes
What I guess I was hoping for was that by just looking at an photograph I would be able to say if a vignette would add to overall effect.

Can't you?
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2010, 10:33:18 AM »
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Quote from: KencoGoldACHLandscapes
What I guess I was hoping for was that by just looking at an photograph I would be able to say if a vignette would add to overall effect.

Thank you very much - I think I should just keep experimenting which is probably always best !
I think if you keep on experimenting and comparing the with and without versions, you'll quickly learn to judge.

Eric


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stamper
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« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2010, 03:44:13 AM »
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Imo, the subject or focal point would have to be central in the image otherwise it would look strange? It can make an image if done properly.
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KencoGoldACHLandscapes
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« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2010, 05:25:56 AM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
Can't you?
Not really , some photographs that I think it might work on does not work at all , I guess it is something that you get a feel for the more you do you it.

Cheers
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2010, 05:58:10 AM »
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Quote from: KencoGoldACHLandscapes
Not really , some photographs that I think it might work on does not work at all , I guess it is something that you get a feel for the more you do you it.

Cheers

I think you will get the hang of it ... make a template/preset you can add and subtract quickly and play with it.

As others have said - look for strong central subjects ... and have fun!

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tokengirl
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« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2010, 04:11:36 PM »
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Quote from: stamper
Imo, the subject or focal point would have to be central in the image otherwise it would look strange?

Not necessarily.  For example, in Silver Efex Pro you can add a vignette AND move the center point of the vignette to wherever you want in the photo.  Come to think of it, that would be a nice feature for Adobe to implement in Lightroom 3.
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