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Author Topic: Reason for being  (Read 3871 times)
Ray
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« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2010, 11:47:05 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Shame on you Ray! Great Aunt Margaret did not move; she suffered from corner distortion of the lens, as I am sure she would have told you!

No wonder she was the favourite aunt - we all secretly love the rebellious spirit, as your Dad realised.

;-)

Rob C

Rob,
It's unlikely that corner distortion was so sudden and obvious in just one corner of the frame, even in 19th century lenses, so there's little doubt that she moved at the precise time the shutter was released. Nor is it likely that Great Aunt Margaret would have known about such things as corner distortion.

However, if she had, and if I'd been alive at the time and she'd offered such an excuse, being the perfect gentleman that I am, I would not have argued with her   .

I'm reminded of another snapshot of Great Aunt Margaret that my father took as a teenager (during the following century) with his first 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 'plate' camera. He inadvertently misframed her and cut off the top of her head. She was not only rebellious, but vain. She frequently poked fun at my father for that misdemeanor and he never, ever again chopped of the hands, feet or heads of any subject in subsequent photos, thus depriving himself of the creative freedom of modern art.
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Rob C
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« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2010, 03:21:29 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Absolutely. That's not innocence. THIS is innocence.

[attachment=20604:Me_and_T6.jpg]




Or just a quick route to a short back'n'sides?

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2010, 03:24:56 PM »
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Quote from: Ray
I'm reminded of another snapshot of Great Aunt Margaret that my father took as a teenager (during the following century) with his first 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 'plate' camera. He inadvertently misframed her and cut off the top of her head. She was not only rebellious, but vain. She frequently poked fun at my father for that misdemeanor and he never, ever again chopped of the hands, feet or heads of any subject in subsequent photos, thus depriving himself of the creative freedom of modern art.



Why does he remind me somehow of Henry VIII?

Rob C



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Ray
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« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2010, 03:13:06 AM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Why does he remind me somehow of Henry VIII?

Rob C

Rob,
I agree it does sound a bit bloody the way I described it. However, great Aunt Margaret was a hospital matron and would have been very familiar with the unpleasant sight of truncated limbs. Any suggestion in a photo that she had been given an extreme lobotomy would not have been appreciated   .
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stamper
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« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2010, 03:18:26 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Well, I'll have to admit that there's a lot of immaturity in those pictures, but innocence? I'm not so sure. I don't have any at that age with cameras in them -- just airplanes. Looks as if you were a reasonably good photographer though.

Are you saying that he isn't now?
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stamper
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« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2010, 04:41:03 AM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Okay, then, but at your own risk!

P.S. How do you like the minimalist string neckstrap? Poverty, poverty!

Looks like a young Rikki Fulton. For the benefit of the American audience Rikki was a famous Scottish comedian, now sadly departed.

http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....st&id=20592

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http...ved=0CCUQ9QEwBw

Rob have you come back to life and now living in Mallorca?
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 04:42:48 AM by stamper » Logged

Rob C
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« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2010, 04:01:10 PM »
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Quote from: stamper
Looks like a young Rikki Fulton. For the benefit of the American audience Rikki was a famous Scottish comedian, now sadly departed.

http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index....st&id=20592

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http...ved=0CCUQ9QEwBw

Rob have you come back to life and now living in Mallorca?





No, I don't think I died again recently, but the next time I'm gone, if I meet up with my favourite person again, we won't be comin' back no' mo'.

Mr Fulton! And I had fond ideas of being the Scottish James Dean, Frankie Avalon, Dean Martin and even, on a wild day, Gregory Peck! Perhaps the latter because I had a thing for Ava Gardener at the time, all mixed up with The Snows of Kilimanjaro. Well, once BB came on the scene, Ava had had it.

Makes me think about how those stars have gone, been replaced by zeros; where the Avas, the Ritas, the Susans, the Yvonnes, the Janes, the Marilyns, the hell, it just goes on and on. What a short sell today's lot is; nothing for anyone beyond the rabid teenager. It's a croc.

You know, we write reams of stuff about photography, why we do it, how we do it, but we never seem to get our heads around the idea that just about all the visual thinking we do has been more movie influenced than by anything we ever saw in print or on the wall.

Rob C

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kikashi
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« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2010, 03:28:00 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Absolutely. That's not innocence. THIS is innocence.

[attachment=20604:Me_and_T6.jpg]
Not to mention a degree of trust that nobody will press the start button while you're not looking.

Jeremy
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