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Author Topic: PA241W and Spectraview II  (Read 54714 times)
Czornyj
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« on: March 04, 2010, 08:00:42 AM »
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I'll have the new PA241W for tests next week, so I'm curious - when will it be supported by Spectraview II?
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probep
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2010, 09:08:13 AM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
I'll have the new PA241W for tests next week, so I'm curious - when will it be supported by Spectraview II?
In April.
Look at http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp...essage=34693323
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AdrianRogers
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2010, 11:02:57 AM »
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Presume there will be no option to upgrade later for EU customers ala current Spectraview situation?
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Czornyj
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2010, 12:28:19 PM »
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Quote from: probep
In April.
Thanks!

Quote from: AdrianRogers
Presume there will be no option to upgrade later for EU customers ala current Spectraview situation?

NEC Display Europe policy is different than NEC Display America policy - in Europe they're selecting best units, tag 'em with Spectraview label, and enable hardware calibration. In US there's more democratic approach, so you can have hardware calibration in any unit - but you can't get best units selected by NEC technicians.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2010, 12:32:42 PM by Czornyj » Logged

probep
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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2010, 10:27:10 PM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
NEC Display Europe policy is different than NEC Display America policy - in Europe they're selecting best units, tag 'em with Spectraview label, and enable hardware calibration. In US there's more democratic approach, so you can have hardware calibration in any unit - but you can't get best units selected by NEC technicians.
Yes, you are absolutely right. But "American" SpectraView II supports NEC MDSVSENSOR2 colorimeter that is "Custom Calibrated for Wide-Gamut NEC Displays". I like it. NEC MDSVSENSOR2 sensors are specifically calibrated for SpectraView II against a lab grade instrument to match a particular type of display.

BTW I have compared NEC MDSVSENSOR2 with some "generic" sensors for NEC 2690WUXi2 monitor. Here is the result.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 10:40:28 PM by probep » Logged
Czornyj
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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2010, 04:22:50 AM »
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Quote from: probep
Yes, you are absolutely right. But "American" SpectraView II supports NEC MDSVSENSOR2 colorimeter that is "Custom Calibrated for Wide-Gamut NEC Displays". I like it. NEC MDSVSENSOR2 sensors are specifically calibrated for SpectraView II against a lab grade instrument to match a particular type of display.

BTW I have compared NEC MDSVSENSOR2 with some "generic" sensors for NEC 2690WUXi2 monitor. Here is the result.

Very funny  Doesn't Spyder 3's "optical design and color engine enable precise calibration and profiling of the latest in wide gamut, LED backlight and AdobeRGB displays"?

AFAIK Karl Koch created correction tables for popular colorimeters, so Spectraview Display 4 (aka basICColor) should achive better results - as long as the inter-instrumental agreement of colorimeter is good enough
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probep
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2010, 05:52:25 AM »
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Very funny  Doesn't Spyder 3's "optical design and color engine enable precise calibration and profiling of the latest in wide gamut, LED backlight and AdobeRGB displays"?

AFAIK Karl Koch created correction tables for popular colorimeters, so Spectraview Display 4 (aka basICColor) should achive better results - as long as the inter-instrumental agreement of colorimeter is good enough
About Spyder3. I bought my Spyder3Elite one year ago and it's very inaccurate for wide gamut displays. NEC wrote: "Some early production units (Spyder3) did not produce acceptable results, however recent production units of the Spyder3 have shown some accuracy improvements when measuring wide color gamut displays. " Maybe that is the reason.

BTW SpectraCal company calibrates user's Spyder3 for CalMAN application. But: "You will send in your Spyder3 and it will be verified if it can indeed be calibrated. If its performance is too far out of range to correct, your Spyder3 will be returned to you"
« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 07:48:07 AM by probep » Logged
Anthony R
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2010, 11:40:31 AM »
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Have you received your unit yet? I'm quite interested in this monitor.
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Czornyj
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2010, 08:01:39 AM »
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Have you received your unit yet? I'm quite interested in this monitor.

It's beautiful - I highly recommend it. The uniformity is better than in x90 series, the tonality is better, the gamut is larger, the hardware calibration can be made thru USB interface (it is faster), and the display has unique feature to change it's color space, so it may emulate various synthetic editing spaces (something similar to HP2480zx function).
Unfortunatelly I have no acces to new Spectraview II (or III?), but the display seems to be a strong competitor to Eizo CG243W.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 08:02:28 AM by Czornyj » Logged

Anthony R
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2010, 10:45:20 AM »
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It's beautiful - I highly recommend it. The uniformity is better than in x90 series, the tonality is better, the gamut is larger, the hardware calibration can be made thru USB interface (it is faster), and the display has unique feature to change it's color space, so it may emulate various synthetic editing spaces (something similar to HP2480zx function).
Unfortunatelly I have no acces to new Spectraview II (or III?), but the display seems to be a strong competitor to Eizo CG243W.


Good to know, thanks. I'm currently using a CG211 and CG241W. I wonder why the price is so much lower than the x90 series and when a larger (26") might be available and at what price. What are you calibrating the monitor with?
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Czornyj
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2010, 11:01:44 AM »
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Quote from: Anthony R
Good to know, thanks. I'm currently using a CG211 and CG241W. I wonder why the price is so much lower than the x90 series and when a larger (26") might be available and at what price. What are you calibrating the monitor with?

There'll be no 26" - PA271W will be 27" panel with 2560x1440 resolution, an it should be available in a month or two

I use i1pro rev.D - I'll share my validation results as soon as I'll finish the test. It won't tell the whole story, because Spectraview II doesn't support PA241W so the most precise, hardware calibration is not available yet, but it'll give some idea of what's that display potential.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 11:02:02 AM by Czornyj » Logged

heinrichvoelkel
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2010, 03:34:04 AM »
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I wonder, at least in Germany, the price for this monitor is above the 2490.
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Paul Stalker
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« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2010, 10:47:42 AM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
It's beautiful - I highly recommend it. The uniformity is better than in x90 series, the tonality is better, the gamut is larger, the hardware calibration can be made thru USB interface (it is faster), and the display has unique feature to change it's color space, so it may emulate various synthetic editing spaces (something similar to HP2480zx function).
Unfortunatelly I have no acces to new Spectraview II (or III?), but the display seems to be a strong competitor to Eizo CG243W.

I was glad for the lucky timing in seeing your comments and would be keen on additional comments from anyone who is able to yet. I've got funds for a new display (to use with my year-old 3800) that must be spent in the next week. I've already decided on NEC and had been thinking since a few weeks ago of the 2690W2 (Spectraview-included version of 2690WUXi2) when I read about the imminent arrival of the PA241W. These are listed but not available yet in North America (I've heard from a week overdue to 6-10wks away). I could easily live with a screen that's 1.4in smaller and would probably prefer taking that size hit if it's a better display. And is it that much better to make it worth slightly more than a bigger 2690WUXi2 (as listed here in NA)? I'm willing to prepay & then wait if necessary but am hesitant without seeing a major review or additional comments from LuLa users. I would presumably get Spectraview (III?) later. Thanks for comments or advice.
cheers,
Paul
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Roy
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« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2010, 05:53:07 PM »
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Quote from: PaulStalker
I was glad for the lucky timing in seeing your comments and would be keen on additional comments from anyone who is able to yet. I've got funds for a new display (to use with my year-old 3800) that must be spent in the next week.

Paul,

CDW (cdw.ca) is now listing the PA241W at $1230 Cdn. Vistek is also listing it but at 1349!

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Roy
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« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2010, 06:03:32 PM »
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Quote from: Czornyj
Unfortunatelly I have no acces to new Spectraview II (or III?), but the display seems to be a strong competitor to Eizo CG243W.

What is interesting about the unit, and it will be even more interesting to see how it pans out for users, is you don’t have to use an instrument or SpectraView II to calibrate it unless you wish to. The monitor is factory calibrated using a very expensive lab grade color sensor and is capable of tracking how colors change over time and temperature, brightness etc. The color engine allows you to set in a specific luminance, white point, gamut etc. which it will then use to set this all out without the need for an external sensor.
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Andrew Rodney
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Roy
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« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2010, 08:01:50 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
What is interesting about the unit...

Andrew, sounds wonderful, tell more!

Calibrated to what? Doesn't my software need a monitor profile to know how to manage it?
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Roy
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« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2010, 08:03:33 PM »
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Quote from: Roy
Calibrated to what? Doesn't my software need a monitor profile to know how to manage it?

There are target calibrations such as Adobe RGB (1998), sRGB, full gamut, then you tell the software the cd/m2 values you wish. It then builds a profile to reflect that.
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Andrew Rodney
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Roy
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« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2010, 08:12:34 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
There are target calibrations such as Adobe RGB (1998), sRGB, full gamut, then you tell the software the cd/m2 values you wish. It then builds a profile to reflect that.

My VISA card may get some use tomorrow! This sounds like the next step. My Apple 23" display may soon be on Crag's List.

I have good calibration gear (iOne pro and display), so do I put that away, or use it?
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Roy
digitaldog
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« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2010, 08:49:52 PM »
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Quote from: Roy
My VISA card may get some use tomorrow! This sounds like the next step. My Apple 23" display may soon be on Crag's List.

Well its still a pre-production unit I’m looking at so you might want to wait until the dust settles, the product is actually released and it gets a more through review from others.
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Andrew Rodney
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Paul Stalker
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« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2010, 10:53:53 PM »
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The last week of March came and went without my new display being purchased---my organization changed the rules and allowed a 1yr-max roll-over for "time-limited" funding. So I decided to wait to find out more about the PA241W. My main question is how does this fit into NEC's line-up? Is this a replacement for the 2690WUXi2 or will the 2690WUXi2 continue to be sold with the PA241W being a junior model to it? Since most high technology changes quickly it's usually a smarter purchase to buy the latest model. Is that true in this case?

So far the PA241W features look very intriguing but info seems to be coming so slowly on this that I'm worried I'm going to soon be tempted to then wait for the PA271W (June?)! I don't know how much longer my old display can hold out.

BTW, CDW.CA is now finally listing actual PA241W stock in the tens of units but only in the Calgary & Vancouver warehouses.

cheers
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