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Author Topic: PA241W and Spectraview II  (Read 49843 times)
Czornyj
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« Reply #120 on: January 11, 2011, 02:04:18 PM »
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I am concerned about the
Pixels per inch (PPI) or Pixel Density of just 94

Everything will be to large, what can I do about this.

My W701 has a PPI of 133

Slide it backwards!
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Manuel_A
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« Reply #121 on: January 11, 2011, 02:35:39 PM »
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Slide it backwards!


Hi Czornyj,

Say what...
Please explain
« Last Edit: January 11, 2011, 02:38:10 PM by Manuel_A » Logged
AndrewKulin
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« Reply #122 on: January 12, 2011, 06:01:19 PM »
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I just received a PA271W last week and have downloaded the 2-week trial of BasICColor.  I also managed to find enough desk space to also keep my old Dell FPW2405 in use in a dual monitor set-up.

What I find odd however is that as others have noted for the NEC monitors (PA241W or PA271W) all 4 calibration methods are available for my PA271W.  But the odd part is, all 4 calibration methods are also shown as available for my close to 6-year old Dell monitor (and this includes Hardware calibration (Monitor LUTs)).  I am surprised the Dell has such a capability, to the point where I question if the software is properly identifying what methods are really available. 

Any thoughts?
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Dan Sroka
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« Reply #123 on: January 17, 2011, 09:53:22 AM »
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I just purchased the NEC PA271W with SpectraVision II. I'm interested to know what SpectraVision settings other people are using for photo editing. I started with their "Photo Editing" settings, and just knocked Intensity down to 120 to make it better suited for my workspace (see attached). Anyone else do anything different?

I have a few other questions about how to best use/understand the new power this monitor and software give me:

(1) in what situations might you want to change Color Gamut to AdobeRGB, or change Contrast Ratio to a specific setting?
(2) under Preferences/Calibration, there's an option for Calibration Priority (Max contrast ratio vs Best Greyscale) -- what are people's experiences with these?
(3) when I wake the monitor up from sleep, it seems to take a minute to "settle in", with the monitor flickering different colors. Is this normal?

Any other photography workflow suggestions? (I wish NEC's manual gave more concrete advice/examples for their end users!)
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 10:04:14 AM by dansroka » Logged
rmyers
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« Reply #124 on: January 17, 2011, 04:25:48 PM »
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I just purchased the NEC PA271W with SpectraVision II. I'm interested to know what SpectraVision settings other people are using for photo editing. I started with their "Photo Editing" settings, and just knocked Intensity down to 120 to make it better suited for my workspace (see attached). Anyone else do anything different?

I have a few other questions about how to best use/understand the new power this monitor and software give me:

(1) in what situations might you want to change Color Gamut to AdobeRGB, or change Contrast Ratio to a specific setting?
(2) under Preferences/Calibration, there's an option for Calibration Priority (Max contrast ratio vs Best Greyscale) -- what are people's experiences with these?
(3) when I wake the monitor up from sleep, it seems to take a minute to "settle in", with the monitor flickering different colors. Is this normal?

Any other photography workflow suggestions? (I wish NEC's manual gave more concrete advice/examples for their end users!)

1)  If you were going to output it in Adobe RGB.  sRGB for web browsing or looking at photos you were going to post on the web.  

Contrast ratio can be used for print matching.  A print will probably not have a contrast of over 300:1.  I set up a profile for a semi gloss paper that had white point at 6K, luminance at 100 cd/m2 and contrast 200:1.  I sent some files to an online printer and compared them when they came back.  Pretty dang close.  I will fine tune it.  When I get that match where I want it, I will name that profile with the name of the paper and the online printer.

2) Pretty sure that Best Grayscale will not work with anything other than native contrast.  Will have to look at manual tonight.  Others might chime in that know for sure.

3)  Mine seems to take a minute or two after I turn it on to stabilize, almost like warming up.  I would like to know if this is common as well.

Another feature is that you can use ICC profiles for soft proofing.  I am new to this monitor as well and am reading and studying at a slow pace.  I bought Digital Dog's book and am in the process of learning about color management and specifically the use of ICC profiles currently.  It will be a while before I can utilize all the features of this monitor.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 04:27:58 PM by rmyers » Logged
Dan Sroka
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« Reply #125 on: January 17, 2011, 07:46:38 PM »
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Thanks for the feedback.

2) Pretty sure that Best Grayscale will not work with anything other than native contrast.  Will have to look at manual tonight.  Others might chime in that know for sure.

Yes, that's true. Wish the description was a bit more detailed about what it actually *does*.

Quote
3)  Mine seems to take a minute or two after I turn it on to stabilize, almost like warming up.  I would like to know if this is common as well.

Well, both of ours do it, and it seems to mimic the behavior when you switch profiles, so it looks like it is by design.

Quote
Another feature is that you can use ICC profiles for soft proofing.  I am new to this monitor as well and am reading and studying at a slow pace.

I just discovered this feature in MultiProfiler, but need read up some more as well.
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davidh202
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« Reply #126 on: January 19, 2011, 09:26:53 PM »
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1 Contrast ratio can be used for print matching.  A print will probably not have a contrast of over 300:1.  I set up a profile for a semi gloss paper that had white point at 6K, luminance at 100 cd/m2 and contrast 200:1.  I sent some files to an online printer and compared them when they came back.  Pretty dang close.  I will fine tune it.  When I get that match where I want it, I will name that profile with the name of the paper and the online printer.

 3)  Mine seems to take a minute or two after I turn it on to stabilize, almost like warming up.  I would like to know if this is common as well.
 

I have the 241 and view in a darkened environment and am using the same settings with very good results with an Epson 7900.
The monitor, or I should say the Spectraview software goes through a 1 minute 'tune up', when first turned on I get a small splash screen with a 60 second countdown.
All monitors need at least 20 minutes or so to warm up and stabilize before doing any calibrating or profiling.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 09:30:57 PM by davidh202 » Logged
ejnewman
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« Reply #127 on: February 04, 2011, 04:40:26 AM »
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I decided this should be a new post, please see:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=50961.0
« Last Edit: February 04, 2011, 06:43:04 AM by ejnewman » Logged
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