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Author Topic: Wireless Printing  (Read 2684 times)
T_om
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« on: March 06, 2010, 09:03:37 AM »
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Due to space and wiring runs, we are thinking about putting a 24" Canon ipf6100 on a wireless hookup.

Since what I know about such things could be inscribed on the head of a pin with a cold chisel, I would appreciate some advice from those of you with wireless setups.  We already have a wireless router going and things like our laptop "sees" it and talks back and forth with no input from us.  Thankfully.

If you have time, please explain in terms adapted to a child of, oh, about 6 years old.  What gear is needed?  Is speed adversely effected?  Anything info all would be helpful.

Tom
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2010, 11:28:49 AM »
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I actually print a lot via my wireless connection.  Naturally a wireless router is a must and the printer can be hooked up to a main computer (that's always on) as a shared printer or you can attach it to a print server or if the printer is ethernet ready you can just plug that into your router and you will always have access to that printer regardless of which computers are on.  It's very simple process.  

Funny you ask about the speed, because I never did any tests.  At first blush the speed shouldn't be affect accept possibly by huge files and then only during the spooling process.  I've never noticed any delays in printing via my wireless connection.  

Wireless router, pick one there's a lot of good ones by netgear, linksys, belkin etc.  follow the router manufacturers instructions, networking can be done by a 6 year old day compared to 10+ years ago.  Your printer will have instructions on wireless connections I'm sure, some printers not all the features work as far as preview printing or ink levels, YMMV
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T_om
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2010, 01:05:41 PM »
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Quote from: Gemmtech
I actually print a lot via my wireless connection.  Naturally a wireless router is a must and the printer can be hooked up to a main computer (that's always on) as a shared printer or you can attach it to a print server or if the printer is ethernet ready you can just plug that into your router and you will always have access to that printer regardless of which computers are on.  It's very simple process.  

Funny you ask about the speed, because I never did any tests.  At first blush the speed shouldn't be affect accept possibly by huge files and then only during the spooling process.  I've never noticed any delays in printing via my wireless connection.  

Wireless router, pick one there's a lot of good ones by netgear, linksys, belkin etc.  follow the router manufacturers instructions, networking can be done by a 6 year old day compared to 10+ years ago.  Your printer will have instructions on wireless connections I'm sure, some printers not all the features work as far as preview printing or ink levels, YMMV


Thanks for the info.  We already have a wired/wireless router hooked up to the main computer.  It came with our Internet and WiFi capable phone.  What I was hoping for is a magic box I could just plug into the printer LAN connection (the ipf6100 has a LAN plugin socket but not built-in wireless) and then send files from the main computer to the printer.  The main computer would do the work, I just need to replace the physical wire between the router and the printer.  Is that doable?

Tom
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2010, 02:02:42 PM »
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Then just use a wireless print server, linksys, netgear etc make them.
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T_om
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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2010, 06:34:51 PM »
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Quote from: Gemmtech
Then just use a wireless print server, linksys, netgear etc make them.

See post number 1 above.

Tom
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ghaynes754
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« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2010, 11:17:34 PM »
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Tom

You didn't mention your operating system, but....if you are on a Mac the Apple Airport Extremes work flawlessly.  There are a couple of us on LL using them.  At a high level you need 2.  One to act as your primary wireless/router hub and the other as an extension of that hub.  The extension is the unit that runs your printer.  I use mine with an Epson 9900.  While a bit tricky to setup I'd be happy to send you the configuration settings if this is the route you take.

I run the primary hub which feeds all of my other wireless devices and also is hardwired into a remote standard hub to distribute hard wire to the rest of the house.  I also run an Ooma VOIP unit (VOIP like Vonage but no monthly charges) and everything has been solid.

Gary
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keithrsmith
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2010, 02:38:18 AM »
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If you have printers connected via wireless, I suggest you make a point of setting their addresses rather than using DHCP.  If you turn the printers off they may pick up the wrong address next time and you won't be able to print to them.

Keith
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kikashi
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« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2010, 03:37:09 AM »
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Quote from: T_om
Due to space and wiring runs, we are thinking about putting a 24" Canon ipf6100 on a wireless hookup.

Since what I know about such things could be inscribed on the head of a pin with a cold chisel, I would appreciate some advice from those of you with wireless setups.  We already have a wireless router going and things like our laptop "sees" it and talks back and forth with no input from us.  Thankfully.

If you have time, please explain in terms adapted to a child of, oh, about 6 years old.  What gear is needed?  Is speed adversely effected?  Anything info all would be helpful.

Tom
Rather than wireless, you could consider using the various ethernet-over-mains (not to be confused with power-over-ethernet) solutions, which essentially use the mains electrical wiring as networking cable. I bought mine from Amazon in the UK but the US site seems to have a similar thing here.

Changing from a wireless to a wired connection using these gadgets took me all of five minutes (no setup at all other than plugging in the ethernet cables) and tripled the speed of my Internet connection.

Just a thought.

Jeremy
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T_om
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« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2010, 08:44:37 AM »
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Quote from: ghaynes754
Tom

You didn't mention your operating system, but....if you are on a Mac the Apple Airport Extremes work flawlessly.


Mea culpa.  I should have put that in the first post.

WinXP Pro

Tom
« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 08:44:54 AM by T_om » Logged
T_om
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« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2010, 08:46:22 AM »
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Quote from: kikashi
Rather than wireless, you could consider using the various ethernet-over-mains (not to be confused with power-over-ethernet) solutions, which essentially use the mains electrical wiring as networking cable. I bought mine from Amazon in the UK but the US site seems to have a similar thing here.

Changing from a wireless to a wired connection using these gadgets took me all of five minutes (no setup at all other than plugging in the ethernet cables) and tripled the speed of my Internet connection.

Just a thought.

Jeremy

Jeremy, thanks for that link.  I had no idea something like that existed.  From the reviews it seems to be as simple as plugging the thing in.  I can manage that.

Tom
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DaveRichardson
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« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2010, 02:14:33 PM »
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I use a Belkin Network USB Hub (I am sure other manufacturers also make them). It was very simple to set up. An ethernet cable plugs into the hub and into my wireless router.  A piece of software sits on each of my PCs (installed from a disk that came with the hub). The hub has 5 USB ports into which I have printers and scanners. As far as software is concerned the printers, and scanners, look just like they are connected directly to a USB port on my PC.

I hope this helps

Dave
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kikashi
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« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2010, 02:36:02 AM »
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Quote from: T_om
Jeremy, thanks for that link.  I had no idea something like that existed.  From the reviews it seems to be as simple as plugging the thing in.  I can manage that.

Tom
Those were my thoughts and it was all I had to do!

Jeremy
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