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Author Topic: 10d sharpness  (Read 2067 times)
Jonathan Wienke
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« on: August 29, 2004, 01:57:09 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Canon DSLRs need good glass to reach their full potential. Many Sigma lenses do not make the grade. Try a good quality lens like the 24-70 f/2.8L, 70-200L (either f/4 or 2.Cool, 135 f/2, or 100 f/2.[/font]
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2004, 10:28:26 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']There have been many "reported" problems of "Back focus" issues with the 10D. These are listed ad nauseum on the 10D forum on dpreview.com. But beware....[/font]
[font color=\'#000000\']I have an article explaining many of the instances of back-focusing calledFocus-Recompose Sucks. There are times when the photographer's technique is flawed, and not the camera.[/font]
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Evan
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2004, 01:17:17 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']I would take your 10D body to the camera store and try out a good canon lens with USM drive for the auto focus (or maybe rent?).  I have had poor focusing problems (eg, very slow to lock in single shot or too slow for AI servo) with aftermarket lenses though I do not have experience with sigma.[/font]
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markomarko
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2004, 04:40:06 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Be warned, the focus issue caused some Canon supporters to react with religious fervor. Part of it is in reaction to inexperienced users complaining about what is actually user error and part of it is due to bizarre brand-loyalty behaviour.

If you are a good photographer with lots of experience, it is fairly likely the camera is at fault. I'm ditching my 10D asap because of focusing issues. Our newsroom 1D mark II has also had auto focus issues from the get go, so I'm not sure what my replacement will be.

And yes, I use L glass with constant 2.8 aperatures. And no, these issues cannot be attributed to focus-recompose. I don't consider manual focus to be a fix since I paid for auto focus that works.[/font]
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wjy
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2004, 01:05:51 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']I started shooting with a 10d about 3 months ago.  Before I was using a canon a2e.  The 10d has been a bit of a headache.  I get noticeably softer (blurry) images directly from the 10d than my friends get from both the d70 and the mark II, understandably the mark II is a better camera.  Many reviews post the image quality as excellent, and I have read a lot of them.  I also get bad results using the AI servo for action.  Does anyone know of any focus problems in 10d's, or anything that might help me?  I shoot in raw, adobe rgb, with sigma EX digital lenses.  I have tried lots of tests including manual focusing, with not much clearer results.  I get much better results at close focus (under 5 feet) than at wider angle shots.  I have a degree in photography and have been shooting for 10 years with good results from film cameras.  I think I know enough about taking a good picture, but I could be laking some digital know how.  I can get satifactory results using unsharp mask printing at 300 dpi but other shots are too blurry for even that to fix.  sample images I have seen on the web from other photographs using the 10d look sharp.  Can anyone offer me some advice? Huh

Oh yeah canon customer service claims there have been no problems at all with 10d autofocus.
Thanks
William Y.[/font]
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boku
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2004, 06:22:54 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']There have been many "reported" problems of "Back focus" issues with the 10D. These are listed ad nauseum on the 10D forum on dpreview.com. But beware...

1) The main thrust of that forum is to whine about every camera, feature, manufacturer. Oddly, every DSLR at some point is claimed to have major focusing problems by someone. They even bitch about the poor focusing of the 20D, a camera that hasn't even been released yet.

2) If there really is a problem, Canon would deny it. Send it in for a true evaluation.

3) I have a 10D. My images are sharp as a tack. I manually focus and have middle age vision.

4) I use "entry level" Canon L glass (17-40/4, 70-200/4), so I cannot speak about the merits of the EX Sigma stuff, really. I bought a middle priced Sigma zoom about a year ago and sold it after a week. I immediately realized just how important the glass was. Jonathan may make a good point.[/font]
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Bob Kulon

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Clint S
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2004, 12:56:11 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Hi there,
I use a 10d for sport action shots and have been pretty happy with most of the results. Sometimes the images are not as sharp as they should be - but I normally put that down to poor technique, and cheaper lenses. I am usually very happy if i can keep around 1/3 of the pics I take - but the true keepers would be even less. Ie if I shot 600 shots in 1 full day at a track - I'd consider it a fantastic day if I came away with 40-60 quality shots. I only use canon lenses so cant say anything about the lenses that you use. www.gravelbed.com if you want to see motorsport using a 10d.

For back focus,a simple test is to line up a series of dice each about an inch apart, and on a tripod focus on various dice having the lens wide open. You could also try this on a ruler, focus 5in in - and check the results on your pc to see where the camera is focussing. Also check your dioptre on your camera if you are manually focussing.
Good luck[/font]
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Dare to Dream - Dare to Follow your Dream
catama
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« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2004, 05:33:58 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']When you say directly from the camera, do you mean wihtout any post processing? If so, then try sharpening the image with Unsharp Mask in Photoshop or with a third party program like Focal Blade.  The camera's default settings apply no sharpness or saturation to the RAW images, so they will look fuzzy when first loaded. My 10D pictures shine after applying the post processing sharpening and saturation. I also found that Canon L glass improved the clarity and sharpness, but I had more than acceptable results with non-L glass.[/font]
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2004, 12:20:17 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Be warned, the focus issue caused some Canon supporters to react with religious fervor. Part of it is in reaction to inexperienced users complaining about what is actually user error and part of it is due to bizarre brand-loyalty behaviour.[/font]
[font color=\'#000000\']All I can say is that many of the "focus problems" I have looked into have been user error, like improper use of focus-recompose (which is why I wrote the article I mentioned earlier) or just silly stuff like shooting hand held with a 100mm lens at 1/30 and getting motion blur. There have been a few cases where the camera or lens was not calibrated properly, but Canon has been able to solve most of those the first time the unit was sent in for adjustment. I have a 10D, a 1D-MarkII, and a 1Ds, and 8 lenses, and have not encountered front or back focusing problems with any of my gear. Canon isn't perfect, but they're no worse than any other camera manufacturer. If you're having problems with Canon gear, send it in for a warranty repair. If you haven't even done that, then it's sill to complain about them.[/font]
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