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RSL
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« Reply #40 on: April 28, 2010, 05:37:55 AM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Looking or not looking a pussycat in the eye isn't the point: the point is avoiding ever being in the same place as said cat!

Rob C

Exactly!
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Rob C
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« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2010, 12:51:27 PM »
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Russ, after much casual wondering about your picture on the right, here, which had me thinking self-portrait playing piano, I finally realise it's the 'little girl' shot! I also thought much of the Egret in the Sun. At least you didn't waste your time all these years, unlike someone I know too well.

Rob C
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 12:51:53 PM by Rob C » Logged

RSL
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« Reply #42 on: April 28, 2010, 06:39:40 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Russ, after much casual wondering about your picture on the right, here, which had me thinking self-portrait playing piano, I finally realise it's the 'little girl' shot! I also thought much of the Egret in the Sun. At least you didn't waste your time all these years, unlike someone I know too well.

Rob C

Rob, Thanks for the kudos. That kind of appreciation, especially from a pro is always welcome, but I don't know which little girl shot. I've made a lot of them.
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Rob C
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« Reply #43 on: April 29, 2010, 07:38:28 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Rob, Thanks for the kudos. That kind of appreciation, especially from a pro is always welcome, but I don't know which little girl shot. I've made a lot of them.



Hi Russ

It's in the far eastern section I think - just the same shot but, obviously, larger.

Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2010, 09:03:36 AM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Hi Russ

It's in the far eastern section I think - just the same shot but, obviously, larger.

Rob C

This one? It's from Can Tho, Vietnam, in 1965.

[attachment=21738:The_Frown.jpg]

It's one of my all-time favorites. I often wonder what kind of life this kid had. She's be pushing sixty by now.
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Rob C
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« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2010, 12:59:30 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
This one? It's from Can Tho, Vietnam, in 1965.

[attachment=21738:The_Frown.jpg]

It's one of my all-time favorites. I often wonder what kind of life this kid had. She's be pushing sixty by now.


Russ, you need to look at your site more often: ASIA, 40/42!

;-)

Rob
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RSL
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« Reply #46 on: April 29, 2010, 01:18:18 PM »
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Okay. Yes. Now I get it. My avatar. That picture came from Can Tho too, along with the other three little Vietnamese girls. All those kids would be pushing sixty now. When I had some time off I used to drive around town shooting pictures like those. Helped keep me from going nuts.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #47 on: April 29, 2010, 03:39:48 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Russ, after much casual wondering about your picture on the right, here, which had me thinking self-portrait playing piano, I finally realise it's the 'little girl' shot! I also thought much of the Egret in the Sun. At least you didn't waste your time all these years, unlike someone I know too well.

Rob C

Hey Rob,


If you had said left instead of right it might have been easier to guess that you meant Russ's avatar.

Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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Rob C
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« Reply #48 on: April 29, 2010, 04:50:41 PM »
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Quote from: Eric Myrvaagnes
Hey Rob,


If you had said left instead of right it might have been easier to guess that you meant Russ's avatar.

Eric




Eric, it's all done with mirrors; just like with a Rolleiflex TLR, if you think about it.

Rob C
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« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2010, 11:31:13 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Eric, it's all done with mirrors; just like with a Rolleiflex TLR, if you think about it.

Rob C
I can't read what you wrote, Rob. It looks upside down to me (like on a view camera ground glass.)   



Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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PhillyPhotographer
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« Reply #50 on: May 06, 2010, 09:41:17 AM »
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My preferred genre is now "street photography". Over the last year I've spent hundreds of hours roaming the streets of New York City and Philadelphia, I can't imagine doing anything else. I still do landscape, architectural and long exposure photography but none of them gives me the true feeling of being a photographer than being in the middle of a crowded street during the day and an desolate street at night. It takes a person willing to get over their fears of getting really close to strangers and taking photos without worrying about strange looks or being yelled at which still hasn't happened to me. The first thing I noticed too was an increase in my reflexes and ability to compose an image, it's a great photographic exercise. The genre has gown be leaps and bounds over the last 5 years with magazines purely dedicated to it and the amount of exhibitions.

"Street, what to do with it after you shoot it." , what ever you want, most street photographers take photographs for themselves not because they think they can sell them, that's an added bonus.


PS you can see some of my work in June's issue of B&W Magazine when it's released
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 09:55:01 AM by PhillyPhotographer » Logged

RSL
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« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2010, 05:07:00 PM »
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Right on, Michael. Most people who finally get over their shyness and take a shot at serious street photography soon find that it's far more satisfying than landscape or any other kind of photography.

I'll be looking for your stuff in the next B&W. I have an ad in that issue too -- not street -- can't use that kind of thing in an ad without model releases -- but street's always been my favorite kind of shoot.
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PhillyPhotographer
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« Reply #52 on: May 16, 2010, 05:49:28 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Right on, Michael. Most people who finally get over their shyness and take a shot at serious street photography soon find that it's far more satisfying than landscape or any other kind of photography.

I'll be looking for your stuff in the next B&W. I have an ad in that issue too -- not street -- can't use that kind of thing in an ad without model releases -- but street's always been my favorite kind of shoot.

Do you know about this ?
http://www.in-publication.com/home

You might want to keep an eye out for this book when it's released in the fall.
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michswiss
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« Reply #53 on: August 06, 2010, 11:50:30 AM »
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What to do with it afterwards?  I think for most, it's an extended journey to even feel that you are able to truly capture the essence of a moment involving a person or people candidly that has a timelessness to it.  On the road to that point it's possible to get many, many interesting, provocative, humorous images that are fun to have, fun to share and in some cases possible to put to other uses in stock or the occasional art sale.

Similar to Mike, I've also spent many hundreds of hours out in the cities I live and work taking street photographs.  But different in so much as I've strayed into a more documentary-style as I began to realise I had the bones of a project that I became compelled to get to some level of completion.  Subjective as it may be, I think I've grown extensively as a photographer as a result.  Since the only other time I've posted here, I've been on a cover of a commercial magazine in the US and exhibited in Shanghai.

I won't, can't stop taking long walks or finding a perspective from a corner or an alcove in the city that has potential and seeing what I can do with it visually.   And while I definitely enjoy having the images myself, they only take on meaning when shared and seen by others.
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RSL
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« Reply #54 on: August 06, 2010, 12:15:58 PM »
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Quote from: PhillyPhotographer
Do you know about this ?

You might want to keep an eye out for this book when it's released in the fall.

Michael,

I don't know how I missed your post. I guess it's because I was moving into my new studio. I'll certainly keep my eye out for this one. Unfortunately, the hyperlinks on the site don't seem to work.
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Rob C
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« Reply #55 on: August 07, 2010, 04:01:33 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Michael,

I don't know how I missed your post. I guess it's because I was moving into my new studio. I'll certainly keep my eye out for this one. Unfortunately, the hyperlinks on the site don't seem to work.



Russ, have you been kicked out of your house?

Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #56 on: August 07, 2010, 09:50:39 AM »
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Rob, No. Just the reverse. For decades I've had an office in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs, about five miles from my home in Manitou Springs, just below Pikes Peak. Last year, since my wife and I both do things that require more space than we had, we converted our interior garage to workrooms and storage, then built a detached two-car garage with a workroom (studio) above it. This year, when we returned from our winter in Florida, I closed my downtown office and moved home -- into the studio. I've attached some pics. I shot these just after I moved my stuff in. Now there are a lot more pictures on the walls, etc., but it's the same space. I'm going to have a hard time giving it up for the winter when we go back down south.

[attachment=23555:Looking_East.jpg]     [attachment=23556:Looking_North.jpg]
[attachment=23557:Looking_South.jpg]     [attachment=23558:Looking_West.jpg]
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Rob C
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« Reply #57 on: August 07, 2010, 11:30:13 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Rob, No. Just the reverse. For decades I've had an office in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs, about five miles from my home in Manitou Springs, just below Pikes Peak. Last year, since my wife and I both do things that require more space than we had, we converted our interior garage to workrooms and storage, then built a detached two-car garage with a workroom (studio) above it. This year, when we returned from our winter in Florida, I closed my downtown office and moved home -- into the studio. I've attached some pics. I shot these just after I moved my stuff in. Now there are a lot more pictures on the walls, etc., but it's the same space. I'm going to have a hard time giving it up for the winter when we go back down south.

[attachment=23555:Looking_East.jpg]     [attachment=23556:Looking_North.jpg]
[attachment=23557:Looking_South.jpg]     [attachment=23558:Looking_West.jpg]


What a great working space, Russ!

If I were to try posting a shot of mine, I'd first need an ulta-wide optic... My dream had been (lottery permitting) to take the plan of the apartment we have and plonk it in the middle of an orchard or Mallorcan wilderness and then have a space with no interior walls built up on top of that, one part for computing and the other for a wide Colorama roll or a solid curved floor/wall line.

However, if the numbers come up, the first priority after the initial divestment of most of it to the yonger set would be that two-seater de luxe and a tour of some of Europe's top hotels, the Côte d'Azure again and Switzerland and northern Italy. That's today; in the event, the shock of the win might just kill me. Willing to chance it, though!

Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #58 on: August 07, 2010, 12:01:09 PM »
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Well, I'm not in an orchard or a Mallorcan wilderness, but this view out the south window of my studio is a fair substitute. I just stepped outside and shot with a 24mm lens on a full-frame camera, so that hill is a lot steeper than it appears in this picture.  If I climb the path, which is a hell of a lot harder to do at 80 than it was at 70, I can stay on the ridge, walk around to the right, and be in Garden of the Gods. It's as close to wilderness as I want to be while I'm working.

[attachment=23559:Back_Yard.jpg]
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Rob C
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« Reply #59 on: August 07, 2010, 02:01:40 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Well, I'm not in an orchard or a Mallorcan wilderness, but this view out the south window of my studio is a fair substitute. I just stepped outside and shot with a 24mm lens on a full-frame camera, so that hill is a lot steeper than it appears in this picture.  If I climb the path, which is a hell of a lot harder to do at 80 than it was at 70, I can stay on the ridge, walk around to the right, and be in Garden of the Gods. It's as close to wilderness as I want to be while I'm working.

[attachment=23559:Back_Yard.jpg]




Very nice too; if you've done the climb at 70, then no need to do it again today; unlikely that too much has changed other than that the trees/bushes have grown...

There's a hedge and then a farmer's abandoned field across from our terrace - south-facing. The pines are growing nicely where once there was cereal, and in a year or two they will have masked completely the high-tension wires that run across the field. Downside? Well, the walls are made of breeze block and so they are home to colonies of ants which take mad turns and come out of the electricity sockets now and again. There are largish spiders that like to try to break and enter in the darkness, but the glass stops them when they attempt it, so if they are there in the morning, I get the broom and scoop them back into the field whence they came. They have stopped being so persistent since we had a watering system installed for the lawn - took them  a year or two to get the message, though, but they are clearly not natural swimmers.

I admire rats. I once made a bird bath out of steel conduit tubing and a plastic tray. The thing was about six feet tall and one day, watching to see what might arrive for a drink, we were stunned to see this large rat climb the tubing, reach around the underside of the tray and swing free and then pull itself up from the edge. Its way off was easier: it just leaped right onto the hedge, a foot or so away. Amazingly acrobatic animals; shame they are so doubtful in the hygiene department and have such a bad press. Of course, they do still spook me.

Rob C
« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 02:03:15 PM by Rob C » Logged

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