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Author Topic: Pros and cons - H3D-II 39 v H4D-40 v H4D-50  (Read 6203 times)
Quentin
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« on: March 27, 2010, 08:22:17 AM »
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Hasselblad have three cameras with similar resolution but different sensors, and because I am becoming increasingly interested in buying one, I have begun to wonder about their respective pros and cons

 - H3DII-39 is "yesterdays" technology and lighty used cameras can be picked up at good prices, so it the "bargain" of these three choices?  But how does the 39mp sensor stack up against the newer 40mp sensor (I realise the newer sensor is more "cropped", but I am thinking more in absolute image quality terms).

- H4D-40.  Hassys new "Entry level" H4D but with a generous 40mp sensor and from the few samples I have seen it looks to be fo exceptional quality.

- H4D-50.  bigger sensor physically sand in pixel count, but is it as "good" in absolite terms as the newer 40mp model?  Is the resolution difference noticeable?  It is also significantly more expensive.

I discount the 60 because the price hike is too extreme.

A side by side comparison would be interesting, or observations from anyone who has used them all.

I don't discount Phase One's offerings, but for the moment, I am looking just at the pros and cons of the Hassys mentioned.

Quentin

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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2010, 08:47:15 AM »
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It does depend what you want to do with the camera...

Today I photographed pairs of people, and found that the AF focused on the wall behind them - so the APL on the  H4 would be a major advantage.

If you intend to use it on a view camera with large movements the 39, 50 and 60 are the best options, as they do not have micro-lenses.

Phocus 2.1, in my opinion, would make Hasselblad the obvious choice, particularly if you do any landscape.
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Quentin
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2010, 08:59:05 AM »
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Quote from: Dick Roadnight
It does depend what you want to do with the camera...

Today I photographed pairs of people, and found that the AF focused on the wall behind them - so the APL on the  H4 would be a major advantage.

If you intend to use it on a view camera with large movements the 39, 50 and 60 are the best options, as they do not have micro-lenses.

Phocus 2.1, in my opinion, would make Hasselblad the obvious choice, particularly if you do any landscape.


Well I wonder how the H4D-40 would get on using tilt and shift.  It might be a limitation, so its a good point.

I'd be using it for quite a wide range of applications - studio, portaits and landscape.  So it has to be general purpose.

Cheers

Quentin
« Last Edit: March 27, 2010, 09:00:19 AM by Quentin » Logged

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bwphoto
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2010, 10:43:03 AM »
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I am in the same situation as you right now but I am leaning towards the 50MS.  

Important to me:

wide angles will be wider because of larger sensor.
going to be producing very large prints so 50 is nice, agree with you the 60 was too big of a jump.
True focus
ease of use on a view camera in the future.
MS for art repro work.
Mostly studio work.

Everyone's requirements will be different so make sure you ask yourself what you are going to be using it for.
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Quentin
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2010, 01:21:41 PM »
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Quote from: bwphoto
I am in the same situation as you right now but I am leaning towards the 50MS.  

Important to me:

wide angles will be wider because of larger sensor.
going to be producing very large prints so 50 is nice, agree with you the 60 was too big of a jump.
True focus
ease of use on a view camera in the future.
MS for art repro work.
Mostly studio work.

Everyone's requirements will be different so make sure you ask yourself what you are going to be using it for.

MS would be great - but its expensive!  

I wonder about true focus.  Sounds good on paper.

There are huge price differences at work here.  Used H3D-II-39 can be had for around half the price of a new H4D-40 and a third the cost of an H4D-50.  

Quentin
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zazoumarie
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2010, 05:41:39 AM »
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I just bought a couple of month ago a H3DII39 And I am very very happy with it. I had a CF22 before (I still have it :-) great for food shooting, 80% of my work but limited when moiré occure! I was looking for an other back my debate was 50 or 39, I test both i must say the difference is so small really go for a 39 it is the best !
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John.Williams
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2010, 10:43:04 PM »
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IMHO -

It is hard to beat the H3DII-39 in the price/performance ratio of single shot. All the DSLR features of real-time, focus adjustment throughout the aperture range of HC autofocus lenses, and lens correction with older CF lens via the CF lens adaptor. Compatible with SanDisk ExtremePRO 90mb/s CF cards, and large LCD screen. Field/Location and Studio friendly.

Also uses both Zooms (35-90mm, 50-110mm) and the HTS 1.5 tilt/shift lens adaptor - all from same company. Additionally, if you are not familiar with the recent H3DII-31 pricing, you should contact your Hasselblad reseller for local reference information.

The H4D series (40MP & 50MP) bring the TrueFocus technology to augment the items above. Focus, rotate, shoot  - keeps original focus area sharp in the recomposed frame.

The 40MP model utilizes microlenses (like the 31MP) and provides a shifted dynamic range of ISO 100-1600 due to the efficient manner of directing the photons into the pixel wells across the surface of the sensor. I would recommend the 40MP if you are using available light most of the time.

The 50MP model has a dynamic range of ISO 50-800 and will provide the largest original file to exploit downstream, including the multi-shot model (MS). Multi-shot captures four shots, moving the sensor in a square pattern (over, down, over, up) to overcome the color interpretation of single shot (from the bayer pattern covering the sensor.) Detail is enhanced from the contrast in all four shots and is the pinnacle of image quality. This is the choice if image quality is the highest priority.

Everyone is different, and the Hasselblad models address a range of shooting needs - get a demo of your final select(s), it is the only way to know for sure.

John
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Quentin
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« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2010, 06:46:30 AM »
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I'm inching toward the H4D-50.  There is a decent discount off the new price for the 50 if you trade in a medium format digital, but that offer does not apply o the H4D-40.  I will be trading in a Mamiya ZD camera.

I have arrranged a demo for next Tuesday.  I'l post my thoughts here then

Quentin
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
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