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Author Topic: best primer for filming with the 5d2  (Read 2966 times)
geesbert
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« on: March 30, 2010, 01:23:14 PM »
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Sometimes Google isn't really my friend....I've been  looking around, but I cannot find a good primer to get into filming with the 5d2 or any similar cam. I really need the basics, my knowledge of the moving digital image is zero.

thanks

Stefan
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bill t.
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2010, 11:28:24 PM »
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First fill up at least a 1.5GB disc chock full o' footage.  Then try to edit together as many 3-cut scenes as you can, then see if you can edit those together.  Other than that try to keep the tangential action to a minimum, real movies should work mostly in the z-axis aka along the line of sight.  Which is how people mostly move.  Then go look at the books.

Otherwise best advice for a cine-newbie is to watch Citizen Kane 10 times in a row until you are no longer deceived by the current cloyingly affected fad for super shallow focus.  Deep Focus is beautiful, God Bless Gregg Toland!  This is far from Gregg's best clip, but it is what was meant to be.  Anybody less would have jerked our eyes around with 17 cuts.  Looks easy but that camera move took some awesome dolly work and there were probably 15 rehearsals and 10 takes minimum on this one scene.  We got away from deep focus not because of the way it looked, but because making movies that way was too hard and too time consuming.  Scenes built out of closeups shoot faster and leave you more leeway in editing and open the door for rearranging the entire sense of the scene, all of which has been the death of too many movies.  There should be a Happy Face in here somewhere, so here it is...  

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index.jsp?cid=1531
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geesbert
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2010, 02:11:11 AM »
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Man, I really loved that scene! you're right about that movie teaching a lot. I really wonder how they managed to move that dolly through the table...

though I am rather looking into the technical aspects of digitsl video, like file formats and editing and so forth. before I can tackle what I want to show and how I want to narrate it, I need the basics how to get it done.


Stefan
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bill t.
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2010, 02:43:13 AM »
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Best ask that on the bazillions of 5D cinema forums, this is a good one...
http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/canon-eos-5d-mk-ii-hd/

In the clip, the wall and table were probably pushed in right after the dolly passed.  That's what grips are for and why ADR is so important.  If you look close at the nearby wall you can suspect it is still moving for the first few frames where it is visible.  Walls-on-wheels are pretty common in sets that are used a lot, like for TV series.
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