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Author Topic: Spring Bloom California  (Read 3872 times)
tim wolcott
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« on: March 31, 2010, 02:21:47 PM »
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Every year thousands roam the countryside looking and hoping to obtain the magical spring landscape shot.  California is starting to go off.  With a state so big and vast its hard for one to get handle of when and where.  So after taking a 700 hundred mile gander to find out where everything is and how for along it is.  

Spring has sprung but close to peak, should the recent storm hitting us today drop some of the life giving rain it should really help the bloom.  From the Tejon ranch to California valley including the Wind Wolves preserve is very nice.  Wind Wolves will go fast due to its soil content.  But Tejon is going nuts and will peak in the next week or two.  California Valley will be peaking very soon also but is about a weak behind.  More to come as to I will be traveling over the next 3 weeks doing my annual photographic workshops.

Here are some new ones from the workshop last week and some ones from last year.  Tim

You can see more here at   http://www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com/
« Last Edit: April 01, 2010, 11:16:25 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2010, 06:27:25 PM »
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I like these much more than I thought I would when I first glanced at the thumbnails. Composition, light, color and DOF work very nicely in these. Good work.
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bill t.
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2010, 11:59:55 PM »
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First class work, Tim!

Yup it's all about doing the research, and then the footwork, and putting in the time, and of course the luck of the weather!
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2010, 01:15:54 AM »
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Some good work, Tim.  Thanks for sharing them!

Mike.
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2010, 04:09:35 AM »
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Lovely images !

I wonder how you got the colors how they are?
Did you use a polarization filter?
Did you do anything specific in postprocessing?
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Justan
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2010, 08:49:14 AM »
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Thanks for sharing.

It’s always a pleasure to see some of your work!
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2010, 10:05:40 AM »
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Wow!  A bunch of winners!  What really sets these apart, in my opinion, is your capture of alternating shadow patterns and stark color contrasts.  These elements make several of these shots almost abstract for me.  Excellent!

John
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HarryHoffman
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« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2010, 10:48:13 AM »
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Excellent group of images
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2010, 12:23:46 PM »
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Quote from: ChristophC
Lovely images !
Thanks I glad you liked them.  Tim
I wonder how you got the colors how they are?

I wait for the right light in this case it took 2.5 hours for those beams of light to come down where I wanted them to light up the hills.
Did you use a polarization filter?

No people use them way to much, in this case I couldn't and wouldn't lose 2 stops of light.  "Hate the polarizer" If you look at the image you can see that it wasn't used for the shot, and I rarely if ever use them.

Did you do anything specific in postprocessing?  I only use Capture One, I spend all of 30 seconds processing my files.  I use it because there is less interpolation involved.

I'm not a software junkie by any means, even my friend John Paul laughs at me and I lecture against photoshop because it is over used.  You can't replace great light, composition, depth of field and discipline a waiting for what you want when you click the shutter.

It does not matter how many gimmicks the software companies give us, it still won't change the way we should shoot.  It will never ever replace the art of seeing and composing an image.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2010, 12:24:24 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2010, 01:51:37 PM »
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Great to read that it was "just" light and sharpness adjustments!  (I assume you "Scheinpfluged" the DOF?)

But isn't it a pity, that we live in times where one of the first thoughts you get seeing certain images:
Hmmm ... what technical/digital/software gimmick did he use?

Not that I'm against digital - I myself work hybrid in the moment with film and a scanner and I love the levels and curves tools especially.
But somehow I wished I could be free of such thinking.

Thanks for your detailed answer!
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GrantKaye
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2010, 03:59:03 PM »
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Excellent images - no sign of spring here in Truckee though, 24" of new snow Wednesday and currently blizzarding outside!
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John R
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2010, 08:08:16 PM »
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Some excellent work Tim. And I applaud your emphasis on visual design and expression rather than post processing.

JMR
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2010, 12:30:06 PM »
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Excuse my ignorance but what is Scheinfluged.  Not sure what you are talking about on the light and sharpness adjustment either.  This was captured in one shot.  

You know I was the father of digital printing in the 1990's.  I helped invent most of what you are all using today, but it still is about the capture.  Sure you can control your image better, that was what was so nice about what we were doing and the fact you could make images near permenant, look more realistic and eco-friendly.  Here is an article on my work and the way I think.

http://www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.c..._standard1.html

 

Can you elaborate.  On the above.

Thanks Tim    www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com

Quote from: ChristophC
Great to read that it was "just" light and sharpness adjustments!  (I assume you "Scheinpfluged" the DOF?)

But isn't it a pity, that we live in times where one of the first thoughts you get seeing certain images:
Hmmm ... what technical/digital/software gimmick did he use?

Not that I'm against digital - I myself work hybrid in the moment with film and a scanner and I love the levels and curves tools especially.
But somehow I wished I could be free of such thinking.

Thanks for your detailed answer!
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2010, 11:36:50 PM »
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Tim, can you tell the rest of us who couldn't go with you on your workshop this spring where the flowers are on the blooms, what's happening and where.

I know you spend alot of time and money but, this would have been a good one for me to go on, nut work schedule interferes with pleasure.  But I will joining you this fall for a workshop shooting the fall colors.  By the way which one will be best for the colors on the shore.

I have 2 days coming and want to shoot some flowers.  Thanks JP
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #14 on: April 04, 2010, 12:24:09 PM »
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I find that when I do lectures, that this is becoming even rarer in this world.  I find it hard that in such a short time that photographers seem to have moved from waiting and waiting for just the right lighting to just shooting like a photo journalist and hoping they get something.  I guess this is what happens when photoshop says just fix it with our software.

But if you look at an image you fix lighting, composition, depth of field, angle of view and picking the right lens for the job with photoshop.

Is photoshop a great tool of course it gives you control over your image.  Just like when we invented inkjet, its great technology and printer but it doesn't replace the art of printing.

But I thank you John, for your appreciation I work hard at composing the shot and waiting for just the right light to create my pre-visualization.  

Quote from: John R
Some excellent work Tim. And I applaud your emphasis on visual design and expression rather than post processing.

JMR
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2010, 01:36:38 PM »
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Quote from: tim wolcott
Excuse my ignorance but what is Scheinfluged. Not sure what you are talking about on the light and sharpness adjustment either. This was captured in one shot.
....(omitted)...
Can you elaborate. On the above.
Thanks Tim http://www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com[/quote

I'm sorry, most likely I was not exact enough.
I'm not a native speaker, so language errors slip in at times.

Concerning the sharpness I was assuming you were using a technical camera or
tilt/shift lens and using the Scheimpflug principle to get that big DOF.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheimpflug

I didn't mean you were using different shots - I was astonished you were "just" using the
basic photographic means of getting the right light and that DOf technique.
When I was reading your answer, that you did only little/minimal postprocessing
and it was mostly "just" the shot itself, I was reflecting what made me think of
postprocessing and filters and stuff.

And I think I am not used anymore to see good/ awesome/ stunning/
compelling/fill-in-whats-your-favourite-positive-adjective-here images that were produced
using the basic techniques that were used nearly from the beginning of photography.

So - take it as a compliment that my first thought was the wrong assumption you did it
with some additional digital means instead of thinking of the means you took to achieve what you did.
I believe this thinking of mine is an artifact of the digital era we live in.

The happier I was to read you didn't use anything sophisticated/very special software-wise.

I hope I could clear it now and sorry again for my ambiguous writing before.

Cheers
~Chris
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2010, 07:19:00 PM »
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No problem Chris,  Sorry for the delay, just got back from doing some private workshops and wanted to respond before I head off to do some more in Texas for the bloom.  Will share the new images in a new thread very soon.  Hopefully before I head to texas.  I'm a bit wired at the moment but will in the next few days start a new thread.  Thanks for the compliments on my work, but you are not alone in your thoughts, I get that alot,  I find when photographers visit the gallery they mostly have the same opinion at first then I show them how to look for the telltale signs.  

In the old days, before digital we all did it this way for black and white, we should all be doing it this way for color also.  Hope life finds you well.  

www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com              

Quote from: ChristophC
I'm sorry, most likely I was not exact enough.
I'm not a native speaker, so language errors slip in at times.

Concerning the sharpness I was assuming you were using a technical camera or
tilt/shift lens and using the Scheimpflug principle to get that big DOF.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheimpflug

I didn't mean you were using different shots - I was astonished you were "just" using the
basic photographic means of getting the right light and that DOf technique.
When I was reading your answer, that you did only little/minimal postprocessing
and it was mostly "just" the shot itself, I was reflecting what made me think of
postprocessing and filters and stuff.

And I think I am not used anymore to see good/ awesome/ stunning/
compelling/fill-in-whats-your-favourite-positive-adjective-here images that were produced
using the basic techniques that were used nearly from the beginning of photography.

So - take it as a compliment that my first thought was the wrong assumption you did it
with some additional digital means instead of thinking of the means you took to achieve what you did.
I believe this thinking of mine is an artifact of the digital era we live in.

The happier I was to read you didn't use anything sophisticated/very special software-wise.

I hope I could clear it now and sorry again for my ambiguous writing before.

Cheers
~Chris
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2010, 04:29:43 AM »
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Quote from: ChristophC
Concerning the sharpness I was assuming you were using a technical camera or
tilt/shift lens and using the Scheimpflug principle to get that big DOF.
~Chris
Re Schiempflug see also:

Merklinger
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2010, 10:12:28 AM »
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THanks guys for the info, very interesting.  Sorry got somewhat a good night sleep.  So getting back to myself before I leave again.

I find that I have insomnia when I'm out shooting.  I guess to much pre-visualization.  But it helps my mind see so much clearer.  I did the same thing when I was a professional sprinter.

Some of those were shot with a 8x10, 4x5 but most with the amazing P45 phase One camera. Man I love the range of light you can capture.

For many years I found myself being paid and being to self indulged in technical world of photography.  I was one of the founders of Evercolor and inkjet as well as designing printing processes and papers for the Government and the Smithsonian.  It was fun, but like Michael you get burned out and need to focus on what makes us fly.  Shooting and creating the very best image.

Know I only focus on what helps me shoot, equipment wise and help redesign it.  

But to answer your question don't have a tilt shift.  except for the images shot with the 4x5 and 8x10.  

You can achieve the same look by using the right focal length lens for the image you are shooting by setting the hyper-focal-distance correctly.  You are shooting right to the end of your lens but it works and makes shooting very easy.  You just need to make sure the lenses are accurate, most are built very sloppy.  Like the image below set the lens and never focus it again, in the canyon.  I shot this on my workshop, I know its not a spring image but used to show how it worked, I know some know this but when I do lectures nearly everyone does not.  


Hope life finds you all well.     Tim

www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com



Quote from: Dick Roadnight
Re Schiempflug see also:

Merklinger
« Last Edit: April 12, 2010, 11:03:58 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2010, 02:20:28 PM »
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Quote from: tim wolcott
You can achieve the same look by using the right focal length lens for the image you are shooting by setting the hyper-focal-distance correctly.  You are shooting right to the end of your lens but it works and makes shooting very easy.
www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com
I see so many images with the foreground and background OOF, and nothing in the middle.
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Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
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