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Author Topic: Manual canvas stretching machines  (Read 12089 times)
alan a
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« on: April 28, 2010, 02:53:36 PM »
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I'm an amateur but am nonetheless considering a stretching machine.  It is difficult and time consuming to do large canvas stretches of 40" to 60".  But since I'm an amateur and not doing large production runs, the cost is a definite consideration.  Copied at bottom are the links and prices for machines that I found that can do a wrap at 60".   I'd like to have a machine that do a gallery wrap on 60" bars, which means using canvas that is 65" to 66".  If it can even do a wrap larger than that -- that would be an added bonus.

The first unit at only $650 is a case of "you get what you pay for."  It is three 10" clamps spaced out.  Has anyone ever seen one in operation?

The next two, the Canvas Stretch (Cutting Edge Designs) and the EZ Stretch, are both manual.  The first is "open ended" meaning that it can accomodate canvas longer than 60" for a 60" bar.  Not sure about the EZ Stretch.  The price is more reasonable, at $1,150 or $1,350.  

Has anyone ever used or seen either of those machines?

The Gallery Stretcher is $2,000 more -- at $3,150.  Several of you have raved about it, and it appears to be easiest to use, and can definitely do up to and beyond 60" bars.  But it is roughly three times more expensive.

The Tensador appears to be overpriced and has signficant limitations.  It is the most expensive, and you have to reach behind to do stapling.  It is also strictly limited to only 60" of canvas?  If so, the maximum bar size would be 55" or 56".

As an amateur, I'm considering the unit by Cutting Edge Design, but their web site has almost no information, although I called the owner and asked him to send me an owners manual.

I guess their is another manual machine not listed below called the Stretch Aire, but I couldn't find it on the web.  Frederics has a pneumatic machine with that name but that is a different machine.

Here are the links to the various machines:

*************

http://wholesaleartsframes.com/stretcherba...CFYd-5QodpQz4FA

Canvas Stretching Machine

(Three separate 10" clamps spaced out over 50".  60" not available)

$650

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http://www.cuttingedgedesigns.org/index.htm

The Canvas Stretch

$1150  

Can stretch canvas longer than 60" on 60 inch bars.  Manual

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EZ Stretch / Easy Canvas Stretcher

http://canvasstretcher.com

$1350

Can NOT stretch canvas longer than 60" on 60 inch bars??  Manual

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Gallery Stretcher

http://www.canvas-stretching-machine.com/

Can stretch canvas longer than 60" on 60 inch bars.  Staple from the front.  Pneumatic.

$3,150

*******************

Tensador II

http://tensadorii.com/home

$3,525 plus addtional $230 for long nose stapler = $3,755 total

Can NOT stretch canvas longer than 60" on 60 inch bars?  Requires stapling from behind.  Pneumatic.




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Dan Berg
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2010, 03:16:03 PM »
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The first problem with Cutting Edge Design is why no physical address. Yes we are in an era of being paranoid about what we want to tell everyone about ourselves. Business is a different story. I would not send these folks a dime without knowing where the heck they are in south Florida. That aside they may have a pretty good product but I would want to see at least a video of it in action before buying. See also if you can get several customer references to check out.
My Gallery Stretcher is top notch. For the money you cannot go wrong.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 03:20:31 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

alan a
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2010, 03:55:31 PM »
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Quote from: Dan Berg
The first problem with Cutting Edge Design is why no physical address. Yes we are in an era of being paranoid about what we want to tell everyone about ourselves. Business is a different story. I would not send these folks a dime without knowing where the heck they are in south Florida. That aside they may have a pretty good product but I would want to see at least a video of it in action before buying. See also if you can get several customer references to check out.
My Gallery Stretcher is top notch. For the money you cannot go wrong.

The problem with Cutting Edge Design is not paranoia but almost total ignorance of the modern electronic age!  When I gave him my email address ending in @gmail.com -- I had to spell "gmail" twice!  By his own admission, he has almost no knowledge of the internet.  I pointed out that he has no information on his product on his web site -- no video, no manual, and not even a price.  At the moment he is shipping out of the northeast and not Florida.  He claims to have sold a fair number of units over the last six years.  But if that is true, someone who posts here should own one of the units.

Dan, have you ever seen the EZ Stretch which is a similar design?

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Dan Berg
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2010, 04:33:42 PM »
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I'm sorry I have not seen that unit. I did some pretty extensive research several years ago when I purchased the Gallery Stretcher model.
Just a note when I purchased my stretcher unit I had no canvas orders and was just setting up the business. It was used several days a week through my business setup. If you can afford it I would not worry so much about it sitting around unused for several weeks. Still quite a few models for you to look at and sorry I cannot be of more help.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 06:46:33 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

ghaynes754
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2010, 12:05:25 AM »
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CanvasStretch - Saw this at the West Coast Fine Art show (mainly a framing show for the Professional Framer Association).  Saw them demo it and while it looks a bit rough did seem to do the job.  Wonder about the consistency.  Not sure if it was the same company but the unit looked the same.

Gallery Stretcher - This is what I bought.  I'm also low volume but wanted something that would last.  Same reason I buy Hasselblad or Canon.  Works excellent.  Yes it is pneumatic.  You will also want a pneumatic stapler.  Unless you want Arnold Schwarzeneger hands.

Tensador- The other great machine.  Yes it is also pneumatic.  And yes it needs a long nose pneumatic stapler but that isn't any more expensive than a standard length if you are buying a quality stapler.  I have watched John, the owner, use the machine and he staples by reaching over the top of the unit.  Man is he fast....  Most other seem to simply reach or walk around the back side and do the stapling.

I bought the Gallery Stretcher and placed it in front of my work table.  Dan Berg posted a couple of photos of his work space.  Or see the video/photos at their site.  Just made sense for my limited space.  Tensador takes up a bit more space but either one is excellent and you can't go wrong.  Probably why you very seldom see them listed in the used category and when you do they are gone before you call.

Gary
relflectionsimaging.com
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mgibson80
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2010, 08:35:17 AM »
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alan a - have you seen The Quickmate Canvas Stretcher?  

I'm just getting started with printing on canvas and I feel that I'm just not producing a quality product stretching by hand... yet my volume doesn't seem like it will require one of the more expensive pneumatic solutions at this time.  I'm working to gather materials to build something like the Quickmate myself to see if that provides more consistency. Although it's only $400, it appears to be limited to 30" which is why I'm building my own.  My plan is to try a 48" version to see how it works for me... then maybe make some other sizes.

Links: (sorry for using tinyurl, but these links were LONG)

http://tinyurl.com/245yfmf (UK Manufacturer - Tabmaster w/ video)
http://tinyurl.com/237nou7 (USA East reseller)

If my plan doesn't work out, I'll likely end up with the Gallery Stretcher Machine.  Like others, I've done extensive research and feel that would be the best machine for me... It's just a question of having the volume to justify the investment.

Best,
Matt
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2010, 12:13:57 PM »
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Just look at it like buying a snow blower. Its not how many times you use it rather that it's there when you need it. My business  is very low volumn but I would not or could not do without my Gallery Stretcher.
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iCanvas
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« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2010, 07:52:36 AM »
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I recently bought the canvas stretching machine from www.canvas-stretching-machine.com. I bought the 36" for $1995. I mainly do 8x10's, 12x16's, 16x20's, 12x24's. My larger canvas I would rather stretch by hand. The stretching machine is good as long as you have at least 1.5-2.0 inches of canvas to work with. If it is below that then the stretching machine won't be able to hold the canvas. You have to take that into consideration when buying the machine. I don't do gallery wraps. I just use your normal stretcher bars for my clients. So far the machine has worked well and saved me a lot of time. Hope this helps.

Gar
Pittsburgh, PA
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2010, 10:21:26 AM »
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Quote from: iCanvas
I recently bought the canvas stretching machine from www.canvas-stretching-machine.com. I bought the 36" for $1995. I mainly do 8x10's, 12x16's, 16x20's, 12x24's. My larger canvas I would rather stretch by hand. The stretching machine is good as long as you have at least 1.5-2.0 inches of canvas to work with. If it is below that then the stretching machine won't be able to hold the canvas. You have to take that into consideration when buying the machine. I don't do gallery wraps. I just use your normal stretcher bars for my clients. So far the machine has worked well and saved me a lot of time. Hope this helps.

Gar
Pittsburgh, PA

Could you explain what you mean by
"I just use your normal stretcher bars for my clients" and "I don't do gallery wraps".
No problems ,just not sure what you mean and what kind of work you are putting out.
Is the 36" model new to there line? First I heard they make a shorter one.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2010, 10:24:09 AM by Dan Berg » Logged

John Nollendorfs
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2010, 03:50:07 PM »
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The problem with Cutting Edge Design is not paranoia but almost total ignorance of the modern electronic age!  When I gave him my email address ending in @gmail.com -- I had to spell "gmail" twice!  By his own admission, he has almost no knowledge of the internet.  I pointed out that he has no information on his product on his web site -- no video, no manual, and not even a price.  At the moment he is shipping out of the northeast and not Florida.  He claims to have sold a fair number of units over the last six years.  But if that is true, someone who posts here should own one of the units.

Sorry for coming to the party so late, but thought I would reply regarding the Cutting Edge Design Machine. I bought the 30" model in July, after talking to the engineer that designed it. True, there are no videos, or explicit instructions on use. But the machine works VERY well for both conventional wrap, and with the optional Gallery wrap attachments. I have wrapped up to 46" side of inkjet prints with no problems, by just finishing off the sides by hand. (most of the stretching has been done with the 30" of the machine)

John Nollendorfs
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NWFAP
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« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2010, 10:31:41 PM »
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Could you explain what you mean by
"I just use your normal stretcher bars for my clients" and "I don't do gallery wraps".
No problems ,just not sure what you mean and what kind of work you are putting out.
Is the 36" model new to there line? First I heard they make a shorter one.

Dan, the Gallery Stretcher launched a 36" machine a few months ago, if you are on their mailing list you probably received an email about it.  http://www.canvas-stretching-machine.com/products.cfm (scroll down and you will see the 36" machine).  Also, I visited your site today, very impressive set up!  Really like your site.     

I have gallery stretcher Pros and work well. We do hundreds of canvases on them.  About ready to buy the 96" model modified to meet our needs.  I switch out the guns because the stretcher pros use the unicatch gun on his newer models and the older models used another gun (I've found that both guns and the sliding track that comes with the Pro *not on the normal model* tend to stick and misfire consistently).  We take the Senco upholstery gun and attach it to the machine.  Works well, and the staple drives deeper into the canvas so when we finish out the back with framing paper you can't see the staples. 

After using manual equipment, we could never go back from pnuematic equipment, especially the staple guns! 
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Bob Smith
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2010, 03:09:13 AM »
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I see this is an old thread but I'll add a data point.  I've had the EZ Stretch for a few years.  It's built like a tank and works easily/quickly.  The 60" model refers to the width of the slot for holding the canvas so the max size stretcher bars would be somewhat less than that.  I've done only gallery wraps with it.  When doing those you stretch by dropping the print down as you staple from the backside.  The demo that I think is online shows this well.  Because of that you'd need a very tall stand to do anything really large.  I've done 36" x 48" gallery wraps with ease.  I could probably go a bit larger with increasing difficulty.  A little larger on standard wraps would be easier.  I have my unit mounted on the front edge of a tall table that allows swinging a 48" print down for stretching.  That's a height that's comfortable to use easily for much smaller prints as well.

The guy that sells the thing is retired from the aircraft industry.  The way the thing is built shows that.  It's made from very well machined aluminum.  Durability would not be a problem.  Very simple design that should do loads of canvases for ages with little or no maintenance.

Bob Smith
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