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Author Topic: Canvas Coatings - Gloss, Semi-Gloss  (Read 13255 times)
Colorwave
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« Reply #40 on: June 29, 2010, 08:19:31 PM »
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Larry-

Unless you just like to be around sawdust, I'd have a hard time imagining it worth your while to make a quality 24" x 30" x 1 1/2" deep stretcher, when you can buy them for $7.30 for all 4 pieces online (Gallery Pro bars), with dirt cheap shipping (unless you are in Hawaii, like me).  I've priced the DIY option, and it just doesn't seem to make much sense when you look into the cost of materials.  I think that 1 1/2" deep stretchers look the nicest for gallery wraps, and 24" x 30" is about as big as I like to go without center supports or diagonal bracing.

http://www.aswexpress.com/search/?search=s...s=1&start=0
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Roscolo
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« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2010, 09:37:27 AM »
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Quote from: larryg
This is a great thread.  I am now interested in trying the Gallery wrapping myself.  Actually I have done some but it has been several years.


I will start with the roller method  but also am interested in making my own stretcher bars (what the canvas is stapled to).


for 11x14 to 24x30   what size wood would be best  and do you reinforce/brace the frame/stretcher bar or is this needed for smaller enlargements.


This thread has been very interesting and helpful to me

Thanks

If you have a wood shop and the skills, making your own stretcher bars could be worthwhile. I used preconstructed, prestretched canvasses. I just stretched my canvas over the existing canvas. Worked great, and was less expensive than ordering stretcher bars (if you order more than 6) and they show up ready to use. I don't think you will need a brace for 11x14 to 24x30. Mine have no braces and they are very solid. This is for 1.5" profile stretchers. You might need a cross brace for the thinner, shallow profile stretcher bars.



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Colorwave
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« Reply #42 on: June 30, 2010, 12:12:34 PM »
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Hmmm . . . I've thought about just stretching over an existing, pre-stretched canvas before, when I've been in a bind.  I can't buy deeper stretchers a la carte locally, and if someone wants one quickly, the best option is to use a prestretched one.  The double fold thickness at the corners is what ultimately made me decide to remove the old canvas and just recycle the frame.  Has that not been an issue for you?  I cut away a good portion of the canvas at the corner and use a fold technique like the manufactureed canvases, but there is still a folded under tab that has a slight lump on the top and bottom of each corner.  I didn't want to see that thickness doubled by stretching over the one underneath.
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Roscolo
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« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2010, 12:55:14 PM »
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Quote from: Colorwave
The double fold thickness at the corners is what ultimately made me decide to remove the old canvas and just recycle the frame.  Has that not been an issue for you?  I cut away a good portion of the canvas at the corner and use a fold technique like the manufactureed canvases, but there is still a folded under tab that has a slight lump on the top and bottom of each corner.  I didn't want to see that thickness doubled by stretching over the one underneath.

It's not an issue. I cut off the corners, but if you fold under and crease it, the canvas will show you where you can cut away virtually all of the excess canvas, so no lump. This HP video pretty well shows the technique I use:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tdzh8JSnW04

Thanks for the link to the gallery pro stretcher bars. The blick prestretched worked great for me under a deadline, (they got here FAST) and for smaller sizes, but I'm going to try the gallery pro bars for some 40x50's.



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John Nollendorfs
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« Reply #44 on: June 30, 2010, 09:43:11 PM »
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While we are still going hot on canvas stretching, any one have experience with staplers? I've got a Heavy Duty Arrow, but would not like using it for more than an occasional frame. And if it hits a hard spot. . .

Seem to be several electric models, but doing some preliminary research, sounds like most of these under $50 models don't perform that well for driving anything heavier than 3/8". And they seem to malfunction.

Then there's Harbor Freight air models for $20. Sounds like these would drive 1/2" staples better.

John Nollendorfs
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larryg
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« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2010, 09:51:22 PM »
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Quote from: Roscolo
If you have a wood shop and the skills, making your own stretcher bars could be worthwhile. I used preconstructed, prestretched canvasses. I just stretched my canvas over the existing canvas. Worked great, and was less expensive than ordering stretcher bars (if you order more than 6) and they show up ready to use. I don't think you will need a brace for 11x14 to 24x30. Mine have no braces and they are very solid. This is for 1.5" profile stretchers. You might need a cross brace for the thinner, shallow profile stretcher bars.

I certainly do not have any particular skills (although I have a miter saw)  but I looked up stretcher bars with LexJet and it was like $70 but for under $10 there is no way I would bother with doing it on such a small volume.

Thanks for the very valuable information.

I am planning on manually stretching (there is a stretching tool that will aid this)  rather tedious but for starters it will do.


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Colorwave
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« Reply #46 on: June 30, 2010, 11:45:28 PM »
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I think what you saw, Larry, on the LexJet site was probably Hahnemuhle gallery wraps, which are a totally different animal.  They have a unique design, and the corners look quite slick, with the canvas folded inside the corners of the frame's mitre, but they are a highly engineered product, not unlike something sold at Ikea.  There isn't a sliver more wood than they need, and the fact that double-sided tape is used in the assembly means that these are depending on an adhesive product for a portion of their longevity.  It's quite likely that they will last a very long time, as the design is undeniably clever, but the high cost and untested technology (over time) makes me reluctant to try them over less expensive but more safe options.  All that said, for someone who has not stretched canvases before, these seem like a great way to get their feet wet with canvas stretching.
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larryg
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« Reply #47 on: July 01, 2010, 08:30:56 AM »
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Quote from: Colorwave
Larry-

Unless you just like to be around sawdust, I'd have a hard time imagining it worth your while to make a quality 24" x 30" x 1 1/2" deep stretcher, when you can buy them for $7.30 for all 4 pieces online (Gallery Pro bars), with dirt cheap shipping (unless you are in Hawaii, like me).  I've priced the DIY option, and it just doesn't seem to make much sense when you look into the cost of materials.  I think that 1 1/2" deep stretchers look the nicest for gallery wraps, and 24" x 30" is about as big as I like to go without center supports or diagonal bracing.

http://www.aswexpress.com/search/?search=s...s=1&start=0


I looked at the site.  I think I will try these at various sizes.   Do you staple these together or underpin/nail them?
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natas
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« Reply #48 on: July 01, 2010, 09:05:50 AM »
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Just an FYI to everyone.

Framedestination makes premade stretcher bars that are really really nice. Luckily for me they are local, so I put my order in and I get a call the next day to pick them up. The bars are very high quality and perfectly straight.
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larryg
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« Reply #49 on: July 01, 2010, 10:06:30 AM »
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Quote from: natas
Just an FYI to everyone.

Framedestination makes premade stretcher bars that are really really nice. Luckily for me they are local, so I put my order in and I get a call the next day to pick them up. The bars are very high quality and perfectly straight.


Thanks for the link.  certainly would work for a reasonable price.

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natas
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« Reply #50 on: July 01, 2010, 10:24:11 AM »
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Quote from: larryg
Thanks for the link.  certainly would work for a reasonable price.

They really are high quality. Much better than anything you can buy at a store and staple/nail together
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dsgnr
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« Reply #51 on: September 06, 2012, 03:23:18 PM »
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Hello - new here,
I'm looking for some guidance on varnished / glazes on printed canvases. Current problem is that the glaze (574 Clear Acrylic Glaze / http://www.superfpaint.com/cal-western-artistic-acrylic-colors/) and printed canvas (Artex Canvas is a 9 oz. canvas textile with a PVC coating... / http://www.ultraflexx.com/products/specialty-media/artex-canvas) combination has left the end product 'tacky / sticky' to the touch.

I'd like to know if its the PVC coating on the canvas mentioned causing the glaze to be 'tacky' or if it could be that the glaze needs to be diluted with water (1:1)?

Or in other words, what solutions have people found in resolving a 'tacky / sticky' finish to a canvas after it has been glazed / varnished?

Side note: Have recently purchased trial roll of Breathing Color Lyve and would like to know what glazes / varnishes are recommended? Have not tested the canvas yet but afraid that if I use the '574 Clear Acrylic Glaze' as-is, that it will dry 'tacky / sticky'

Help, guidance, assistance would be much appreciated.

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kdphotography
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« Reply #52 on: September 06, 2012, 04:33:49 PM »
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Try Breathing Color's Glamour II or Breathing Color's Timeless.

You can try rolling, which can be an art in itself  Wink, but it's easier to apply by hvlp sprayer.
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