Transitions / Photochromic eyeglasses any experience?

(1/3) > >>

Ed Taylor:
Hi,

A couple of years I started needing glasses for reading and computer work. This has extended a bit into my distance vision.

I currently wear a pair of progressives for computer and close-up work, and they work fine for that. I can wear them for shooting, but my distance vision suffers obviously.

With my next pair of progressives I'm considering transitions / photochromic lenses as I hate constantly having my prescription pair on and sunglasses on my head/collar or vice versa. The constant transitioning when going from sun to indoors is a pain as well.

FTR, I'm also getting a pair of prescription polarized glasses for long drives/bright sun conditions, just to protect my eyes.

I've researched the topic and people either love them or hate them.

Hard to find photographers opinions though, anyone?

Love them? Hate them?

Do they get completely clear indoors? How long does it take?
Do they still darken under fluorescent lighting?
After a while do they never completely clear?

Any and all thoughts would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Ed

Paul Sumi:
Quote from: Ed Taylor

Hard to find photographers opinions though, anyone?

I normally wear contact lenses (near-sighted) and regular sunglasses.  But I have a pair of transitions glasses (corrected for distance vision) and used them a lot on a recent photography trip to Death Valley.  

They still do not get as dark as regular sunglasses and need direct exposure to sunlight to darken (not great for driving).  They do get completely clear indoors.  Overall they did a good job (definitely IMO, YMMV) when I was outdoors.

From a photography point of view, I have mixed feelings because any darkening/polarization/tinting changes how you visualize the image.  In particular, the variable darkening was tough to get used to.

Paul

Richard Morwood:
Quote from: Ed Taylor

Hi,

A couple of years I started needing glasses for reading and computer work. This has extended a bit into my distance vision.

I currently wear a pair of progressives for computer and close-up work, and they work fine for that. I can wear them for shooting, but my distance vision suffers obviously.

With my next pair of progressives I'm considering transitions / photochromic lenses as I hate constantly having my prescription pair on and sunglasses on my head/collar or vice versa. The constant transitioning when going from sun to indoors is a pain as well.

FTR, I'm also getting a pair of prescription polarized glasses for long drives/bright sun conditions, just to protect my eyes.

I've researched the topic and people either love them or hate them.

Hard to find photographers opinions though, anyone?

Love them? Hate them?

Do they get completely clear indoors? How long does it take?
Do they still darken under fluorescent lighting?
After a while do they never completely clear?

Any and all thoughts would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Ed
Hi Ed
If you are going to choose photochromic lenses then Transitions VI are probably the best. (I have no allegiance to any manufacturer but I am an optometrist so I have prescribed quite a few different ones over the years. I don't use them myself because if I want sunglasses I want SUNGLASSES and when I want clear I really want CLEAR and not a compromise,. The compromise being that they aren't dark enough for me as sunglasses and not crystal clear indoors.
Do the go completely clear? No but it really depends on what you benchmark for clear is. An uncoated plastic lens transmits 92% of the incident light whilst an uncoated (no anti-reflection coating) Transitions lens transmits 89%. Add a good AR coat to both(eg Nikon/Zeiss and others) and a clear lens will transmit 99%+ whereas a Transitions lens transmits 95%. Now that is very good and it IS clearer than uncoated plastic but for me not as clear as I want indoors. I want as invisible as possible. However everyone is different and many people love photochromic.
I dislike doing photography in any form of sunglass as I find it harder to judge the colours/polarising effect etc and in fact I will mostly wear contact lenses and no sunglasses at all just because that is how I like it.
When they darken Transitions go to between 23 - 12% transmission depending on temperature. The cooler it is the darker the lenses go. Time taken to darken varies with lens colour. The brown version is slower that the grey but you will get a tint of 25-20% transmission within a minute but it takes a lot longer to fade. After 5 minutes you will have gone from  eg 15% transmission to about 65% transmission. Ten minutes and you are at 75% transmission. I don't know exactly but I would guess 20+ minutes until you are back to the starting point.
All photochromic lenses need UV light to react and hence artificial light has no effect on them. This is also why they don't work well in a car. The windscreen absorbs UV and so it isn't transmitted to the lens, but if you drive a convertible then you are ok!! Rodenstock produce their own photochromic lens which uses UV and blue light to react and it will give a partial reaction in the car because blue light is transmitted through the windscreen. However it doesn't compare with proper sunglasses for driving.
As they age all photochromic lenses will be a bit darker inside and don't go quite as dark in the sunshine.
Many of my patients who have discontinued using photochromic stopped because they didn't like the look of them in certain conditions. Outdoor photographs often have someone wearing "sunglasses" because they have forgotten that the UV and/or cold have triggered them off. Also for many they weren't effective enough, took too long to clear or just too much of a compromise. But I do still have many, many people happily using them. Can't think of many photographers though.
Hope this helps.
regards
Richard

Ed Taylor:
Quote from: Paul Sumi

I normally wear contact lenses (near-sighted) and regular sunglasses.  But I have a pair of transitions glasses (corrected for distance vision) and used them a lot on a recent photography trip to Death Valley.  

They still do not get as dark as regular sunglasses and need direct exposure to sunlight to darken (not great for driving).  They do get completely clear indoors.  Overall they did a good job (definitely IMO, YMMV) when I was outdoors.

From a photography point of view, I have mixed feelings because any darkening/polarization/tinting changes how you visualize the image.  In particular, the variable darkening was tough to get used to.

Paul

Hi Paul,

Thanks for your thoughts.

I hear you about the inability of transitions to get as dark as conventional sunglasses. I've included in my budget a set of conventional aviator sunglasses with my progressive prescription and polarized lenses for those times when the sun is strong, or I know I'll be driving for a significant amount of time.

I'm looking for them as more of a day to day convenience. I'll also carry my other pair which are corrected for reading and computer for those times when the darkening is an issue. My uncorrected distance vision is more than good enough to judge as scene for values, etc.

If I may ask, how long do you estimate it takes for them to get "clear" indoors?

Thanks again!

Best,

Ed

Paul Sumi:
Quote from: Ed Taylor

If I may ask, how long do you estimate it takes for them to get "clear" indoors?

Hi Ed,

Unfortunately I don't wear my transitions glasses enough to have any idea how long it take for them to get "clear" indoors.  I normally wear contacts and carry reading glasses for closeup work and regular sunglasses for driving.

The transitions are for those times when contacts (mine are gas permeable daily wear) are not convenient and also as back up should I somehow lose a contact.

In that role (my transitions also went camping on Hunts Mesa in Monument Valley last year), they work well for me.

Sorry I can't give you any more definitive answers.

Paul

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page