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Author Topic: Does black screen save wear on LCD monitor?  (Read 2128 times)
walter.sk
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« on: May 11, 2010, 07:23:43 PM »
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I've been using an NEC LCD 3090 for several years.  Recently, when backing up huge drives necessitating keeping the computer (and monitor) on all night and more, I decided to hide the icons on the desktop, and then to change the desktop to black, hoping to be a bit easier on the fluorescent tubes, which aparently wear out sooner than the actual LCD's.

Am I correct with this, or does it not make any difference?
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PeterAit
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2010, 07:49:57 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I've been using an NEC LCD 3090 for several years.  Recently, when backing up huge drives necessitating keeping the computer (and monitor) on all night and more, I decided to hide the icons on the desktop, and then to change the desktop to black, hoping to be a bit easier on the fluorescent tubes, which aparently wear out sooner than the actual LCD's.

Am I correct with this, or does it not make any difference?

Any reason you can't just turn the monitor off? Or activate a screen saver?
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Tom Montgomery
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2010, 08:12:54 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
Am I correct with this, or does it not make any difference?
It doesn't make any difference because the flourescent background is still shining behind those black pixels.  The only way to save the flourescent light source is to put the monitor into standby (or 'sleep'), or simply to turn it off when you don't need it.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2010, 10:56:26 AM »
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Quote from: Tom Montgomery
It doesn't make any difference because the flourescent background is still shining behind those black pixels.  The only way to save the flourescent light source is to put the monitor into standby (or 'sleep'), or simply to turn it off when you don't need it.
Thanks, Peter and Tom.

Would turning the monitor off, and then back on while the computer is sending the video signal damage the monitor?  If not, I would shut the monitor off rather than run it for 6-8 hours needlessly.

Using a screen saver doesn't address the issue of saving the monitor from unnecessary use.
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John R Smith
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2010, 03:04:44 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
Thanks, Peter and Tom.

Would turning the monitor off, and then back on while the computer is sending the video signal damage the monitor?  If not, I would shut the monitor off rather than run it for 6-8 hours needlessly.

Using a screen saver doesn't address the issue of saving the monitor from unnecessary use.

Walter

There is no problem at all about turning the monitor off while the PC is running. Just power it down while you are running your overnight jobs, and it can take a well-earned snooze along with your goodself.

John
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John.Murray
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2010, 05:24:47 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I've been using an NEC LCD 3090 for several years.  Recently, when backing up huge drives necessitating keeping the computer (and monitor) on all night and more, I decided to hide the icons on the desktop, and then to change the desktop to black, hoping to be a bit easier on the fluorescent tubes, which aparently wear out sooner than the actual LCD's.

Am I correct with this, or does it not make any difference?

is there any reason you can't alter your desktop power settings to just sleep (effectively shutting off the backlight) the monitor after some reasonable period of time?
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Justan
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2010, 05:40:16 PM »
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I routinely use the computer’s power saving settings to have the monitors go to standby after 30 minutes of non-use of the mouse/keyboard. This put the monitors into power saving mode. Moving the mouse or pressing a key turns it back on. I've done this with hundreds of monitors and never a problem. Service life is not shortened.

In some cases where the customer doesn’t want this (such as at a server console where people will start power cycling the servers if the monitor is off), I put the monitor on a timer. The timer shuts off the monitor after people leave in the evening and turns it back on a little before the first arrives. In this case I have to replace the timer every couple of years because they fail.
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