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Author Topic: Catalog files, Images, and program files  (Read 2236 times)
Adam L
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« on: May 19, 2010, 08:43:53 AM »
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I have a new system and am in process of setting up LR3.   I need advice on where to store files to optimize system performance.

Internal 1TB drive for OS and programs.   I have the Lightroom program stored on this drive

DAS storage w/3 1.5 TB drives in raid 0.   I have the raw images stored on this drive.

I am uncertain of where to store the LR catalog - on the images drive or the OS/program drive?

Running Win7 64 bit.

Thanks for your help!

Adam
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JRSmit
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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2010, 02:42:46 AM »
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Quote from: Adam L
I have a new system and am in process of setting up LR3.   I need advice on where to store files to optimize system performance.

Internal 1TB drive for OS and programs.   I have the Lightroom program stored on this drive

DAS storage w/3 1.5 TB drives in raid 0.   I have the raw images stored on this drive.

I am uncertain of where to store the LR catalog - on the images drive or the OS/program drive?

Running Win7 64 bit.

Thanks for your help!

Adam

I assume the DAS is connected via eSATA.

Wrt to the LR catalog there are two aspects to cover:
The catalog with its preview files (and presets) and the Cache directory(actually the CR cache directory).

Regarding the catalog:
It can be that storing the LR Catalog on the DAS is the faster option, but i am in doubt if it is noticable, unless you use the previews in Library mode often and extensive (zoom-in/out). Note: The presets are normally under the "C:\Documents and Settings\<User>\Application Data\Adobe\Lightroom", but as an option can be stored with the catalog (in its folder structure).

Regarding the cache:
You also need a cache, this holds the previews you use when in the Develop mode (the previews you see in the Libray mode are stored in the catalog folder structure)
This folder is best on the DAS for the best performance (This cache path is set in the Lightroom preferences panel, and the cache size should be made quite big, go for 50GB or more.)


Be aware though that RAID-0 will provide faster disk i/o but at the expense of increased risk of disk-failure (the raid-0 is seen as one "disk"). So do set up a proper back-up. A minimum would be to create a regular backup of your catalog to your OS drive, you can use the backup option of LR for this.

Wrt to the image files:
RAID-0 gives a better performance, but depending on the file-format of your original image files it is more or less noticable.
If camera-specific raw's, you will notice it only during import, once imported it does not really matter as LR does not use the original raw's for read/write once imported. If so selected, metadata is also real-time written in XMP sidecar files, but these are small, and i doubt if it is noticable during LR use.
If DNG or TIFF or JPG, this may differ, as metadata is stored in those files, then when metadata is saved to those files from LR, the performance during development may be noticably better when these files are in a RAID-0 drive.

Again, for security against loss, do set up a proper back-up!!!
There is a commonly accepted rule of thumb: 3-2-1: 3 copies (1 working, 2 backup copies), 2 different storage systems used, 1 copy off-site; This should give you the best protection against fatal loss of images and catalog.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2010, 02:53:55 AM by JRSmit » Logged

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John.Murray
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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2010, 07:56:23 PM »
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This is a very scary setup for several reasons:

Nearly all Hardrives are rated at a MTBF of 2^14, or 1 uncorrectable error every 12GB/Year.  You can therefore expect at least one hard error within 3 years.  A hard error will render the *entire* array useless (RAID 0), resulting in a total loss of data.

Another thing to consider is that the array is external; unless you are using a separate SATA channel to each drive, the benefits of RAID 0 will largely be lost.

edit:  I'm assuming SATA of course, but the first point would still apply even if you are using SAS or FC
« Last Edit: May 20, 2010, 07:57:53 PM by Joh.Murray » Logged

boneywhitefoot
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2010, 04:59:00 AM »
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the idea is to run your main cat and images on your raid and backup BOTH your cats and images on a slower single drive at your leisure,that way you enjoy speed and security.I use a internal drive as a backup for just the images and an external for a complete backup, a clone of the raid array with the whole cat and Karrrbooodle .
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andyptak
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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2010, 07:20:32 AM »
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Get Seth Resnick's D65 book. It's the ultimate for LR operation and set-up. You won't regret it.
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sakharov
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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2010, 11:25:09 AM »
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RAID 0 is really bad idea. It is not reliable enough. If you have only 3 disk slots in DAS, it is better to configure it as RAID5.
If it is not possible, probably you can install a second DAS and mirror it with the first one. You will have RAID10.
If your DAS has more slots, it should be better to create RAID6.

If you can install 2nd internal disk, you can place cache files at this disk.
So, you will have catalog at system disk, cache files at 2nd internal disk and image files at DAS.
Theoretically it could give you better performance for disk subsystem.
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