Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Photographic Philosopy  (Read 5273 times)
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« on: May 25, 2010, 03:32:25 PM »
ReplyReply

Rather than muck it up second-hand:

http://www.ernst-haas.com

Rob C

Edit: apologies for the boob in  the title!
« Last Edit: May 25, 2010, 03:45:39 PM by Rob C » Logged

John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2010, 08:22:06 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Rob C
Rather than muck it up second-hand:

http://www.ernst-haas.com

Rob C

Edit: apologies for the boob in  the title!
Hey thanks for the link. Really interesting. I am going to read it all! I should have guessed there would be a site on Ernst Hass. I do recall coming across his book "The Creation," which according to old reviews was an outstanding success at the time. I was very much taken by the audacity of the "Rose" image. Whether current or older photographers, we are all influenced by these great masters through those who have been influenced by them and who in turn pass on their legacy to us.


JMR
« Last Edit: May 26, 2010, 08:28:50 AM by John R » Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7473



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2010, 08:38:16 AM »
ReplyReply

Yes, thanks for the link, Rob. It's a very thoughtful and insightful set of essays.

But I'm curious, Rob: Many of your posts have suggested that the "art" of photography can't be taught, and that you either "have it" or you don't. It seems to me, however, that a young photographer just starting out could learn a great deal from Haas's philosophy writings. I note that he doesn't tell you how do do anything (no "rules" at all). But he does urge thinking about the right questions, which I believe will help any photographer figure out the best ways to use whatever talent he or she has.

This is what I call good teaching, that helps you focus on what's important. It's a far cry from the drivel that probably gets "taught" in most photography classes. But I wouldn't know about that, because I have only ever studied with Masters (Minor White, Paul Caponigro, Rembrandt, RobC, ...)  

Anyway, it's a great read, Rob.

Eric

Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2010, 04:18:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Eric Myrvaagnes
Yes, thanks for the link, Rob. It's a very thoughtful and insightful set of essays.

But I'm curious, Rob: Many of your posts have suggested that the "art" of photography can't be taught, and that you either "have it" or you don't. It seems to me, however, that a young photographer just starting out could learn a great deal from Haas's philosophy writings. I note that he doesn't tell you how do do anything (no "rules" at all). But he does urge thinking about the right questions, which I believe will help any photographer figure out the best ways to use whatever talent he or she has.

This is what I call good teaching, that helps you focus on what's important. It's a far cry from the drivel that probably gets "taught" in most photography classes. But I wouldn't know about that, because I have only ever studied with Masters (Minor White, Paul Caponigro, Rembrandt, RobC, ...)  

Anyway, it's a great read, Rob.

Eric



I'd be a bit careful about depending too much on the RobC chappie, Eric... never heard of him myself.

Glad you enjoyed the link and yes, I certainly do hold the view you attributed to me about talent being there or not. But I also wonder if anyone without it would really be aware of the fact - I know that even editing can be a problem at times and that says nothing about how confused and blinded I can find myself becoming if I spend too long trying to colour correct images. As I made a reasonable life out of photography I suppose I must have had something, but you can never be sure in your own mind.

There is usually the feeling inside my head that the less I think about photography and just go with my first instincts the better the thing turns out to be. I was reading something a day or so ago that one of my respected snappers had written about never pre-planning his work, just turning up and doing it on the wing. I can't for the life of me remember who it was (could even have been Haas), but I do reflect that in my own modus op. It might be seen as lack of concentration, but I can only say that a sense of urgency has to be there in order for me to function well. I think that's one of the reasons I sort of depended on assignment offshoots for stock material, quite apart from not wanting to spend my own money on that kind of risk which I always felt was rather unfair on the photographers. My view was that the snapper took the major part of the risk with no guarantees whilst the agency did] have a form of guarantee in that it only employed the staff it had to employ to cover the business activity it already had. 'Just in time' management, if you like.

Take care,

Rob C
« Last Edit: May 30, 2010, 04:31:20 PM by Rob C » Logged

graeme
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 265


« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2010, 05:44:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for that link Rob - v interesting.

Graeme
Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7473



WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2010, 08:02:33 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Rob C
I'd be a bit careful about depending too much on the RobC chappie, Eric... never heard of him myself.

Glad you enjoyed the link and yes, I certainly do hold the view you attributed to me about talent being there or not. But I also wonder if anyone without it would really be aware of the fact - I know that even editing can be a problem at times and that says nothing about how confused and blinded I can find myself becoming if I spend too long trying to colour correct images. As I made a reasonable life out of photography I suppose I must have had something, but you can never be sure in your own mind.

There is usually the feeling inside my head that the less I think about photography and just go with my first instincts the better the thing turns out to be. I was reading something a day or so ago that one of my respected snappers had written about never pre-planning his work, just turning up and doing it on the wing. I can't for the life of me remember who it was (could even have been Haas), but I do reflect that in my own modus op. It might be seen as lack of concentration, but I can only say that a sense of urgency has to be there in order for me to function well. I think that's one of the reasons I sort of depended on assignment offshoots for stock material, quite apart from not wanting to spend my own money on that kind of risk which I always felt was rather unfair on the photographers. My view was that the snapper took the major part of the risk with no guarantees whilst the agency did] have a form of guarantee in that it only employed the staff it had to employ to cover the business activity it already had. 'Just in time' management, if you like.

Take care,

Rob C
This line says it very well, and I am in total agreement: "There is usually the feeling inside my head that the less I think about photography and just go with my first instincts the better the thing turns out to be."


I have been fortunate in never needing to depend on photography to make my living. But it took me many years to learn to trust my instincts and stay out of my own way.

So let me tell you about this RobC chappie. He has some good things to say sometimes (as does ErnstH).


Cheers,

Eric

Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
James Godman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 01:12:08 AM »
ReplyReply

Some great reading thanks Rob!  I love the "don't ever try to arrive" comment.  So true.
Logged

James R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 250


« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2010, 02:42:48 PM »
ReplyReply

Wanted to read the article and got caught up in the beautiful photography.  Those B&W images are amazing art.  Now I'll read the damn article.
Logged
tsjanik
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 493


« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2010, 09:46:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Rob C
Rather than muck it up second-hand:

http://www.ernst-haas.com

Rob C

Edit: apologies for the boob in  the title!
Rob:

Thank you for posting this and calling attention to the philosophy.  Ernst Haas was my first inspiration in photography after a friend introduced me to the The Creation in 1972 and for me he remains a gold standard.  Although I've visited this site, I've never read the philosophy section prior to your post.  My favorite quote: " Arrival is the death of inspiration".

Tom
Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2010, 10:51:12 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: tsjanik
Rob:

Thank you for posting this and calling attention to the philosophy.  Ernst Haas was my first inspiration in photography after a friend introduced me to the The Creation in 1972 and for me he remains a gold standard.  Although I've visited this site, I've never read the philosophy section prior to your post.  My favorite quote: " Arrival is the death of inspiration".

Tom



You know, Tom, this is also true (for some of us) of life beyond art. In happier times, when my wife and I used to drive from Spain up through France to Scotland, I wanted to get north as quickly as possible, spend the required, politically correct time there, and start the southern journey as soon as we could.

The journey was the buzz - my own, private Route 66, but with four seats. (Can't have everything!) The wish was to dawdle on the homeward trip to the sunshine but my better thought the opposite - as I said, can't have everything - so we seemed to spend more time going north than south. Maybe that meant something that I was too thick to see at the time and now I will never know. Whatever it was, trips like that were worth their weight in gold to me; probably cost as much too, but I was willing. I often think about doing it again for old-time's sake but have mixed feelings about bitter-sweet. Maybe this autumn, late September when the toursits have all gone back north, the roads are fairly empty and the local kids are back in school...

But yes, far better to travel in hope than just arrive. Maybe a slogan there for the budget airlines.

Rob C
« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 01:51:34 PM by Rob C » Logged

tsjanik
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 493


« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2010, 09:22:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Rob C
You know, Tom, this is also true (for some of us) of life beyond art. In happier times, when my wife and I used to drive from Spain up through France to Scotland, I wanted to get north as quickly as possible, spend the required, politically correct time there, and start the southern journey as soon as we could.

The journey was the buzz - my own, private Route 66, but with four seats. (Can't have everything!) The wish was to dawdle on the homeward trip to the sunshine but my better thought the opposite - as I said, can't have everything - so we seemed to spend more time going north than south. Maybe that meant something that I was too thick to see at the time and now I will never know. Whatever it was, trips like that were worth their weight in gold to me; probably cost as much too, but I was willing. I often think about doing it again for old-time's sake but have mixed feelings about bitter-sweet. Maybe this autumn, late September when the toursits have all gone back north, the roads are fairly empty and the local kids are back in school...

But yes, far better to travel in hope than just arrive. Maybe a slogan there for the budget airlines.

Rob C
Rob:

I think Nissan already used the idea in their "enjoy the journey" ads, but that doesn't make it any less true.
Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2010, 09:16:18 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: tsjanik
Rob:

I think Nissan already used the idea in their "enjoy the journey" ads, but that doesn't make it any less true.



Unless I was still half-asleep this morning, I think I saw a commercial for KLM with a small girl by the sea, where she raises her hand and a distant 'plane flies across the screen. I am sure the voice says somethng to the effect that 'some people now care about the journey as they once used to do' or words to that effect...

As usual, too late by the time I think of anything.

Rob C
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad