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Author Topic: Photographing Waterfalls  (Read 15028 times)
tim wolcott
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« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2010, 01:30:58 PM »
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Quote from: laughingbear
Hello Tim,

I am puzzled by the second (615.19k) picture. Would I be wrong to assume that this is digitally composed?

I mean the leaves show no movement at all, hence I came to think, that you might have shot a few with high speed, and later imposed them onto the long exposure.

... not sure though.

Thanks for showing, most inspiring they are!

Best
Georg

Georg, yes you would be wrong.  I'm not tech software geek.  Please no one take any offense to that.  I shoot everything in one shot.  But yes your right the day must be perfect to shoot that.  I believe the image you are talking about was a 15 sec exposure in Pennsylvania.  T
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2010, 01:38:17 PM »
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Quote from: RobSaecker
Georg,

those are fallen leaves lying on the rock, they would not be in motion.

There is something slightly artificial looking to some of the leaves, but I take that to be an artifact of a low resolution image on screen.

I was teaching a workshop at the time this was taken.  WE all had scouted our location we were going to shoot the next morning and hiked in at 4:50 am.  I was shoot ing that one when a leaf from the tree above landed in the water and stuck to the rock just long enough for the shot to have been taken.  

Your right the image look artificial because of the low res jpeg.  But it looks unbelievable at 60 inches tall.  Thanks Tim
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laughingbear
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« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2010, 05:34:04 PM »
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Quote from: tim wolcott
I was shoot ing that one when a leaf from the tree above landed in the water and stuck to the rock just long enough for the shot to have been taken.

Yeah, that explains it.  

Of course, the impression of a 50inch print is an entirely different scenario. When I look at the screen representation of my own work and have my 11880 turn out a 60 inch wide bamboo print.... no comparison.
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Fine_Art
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« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2010, 01:48:35 PM »
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I really enjoyed Mark's waterfall article. Thanks Mark.

This article made me think a tip jar should be there. Imagine a helpful forum where people can choose to leave small tips for the help. That would encourage good posts.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 01:49:23 PM by Fine_Art » Logged
JamiePeters
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« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2010, 10:14:46 AM »
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I also enjoyed both articles but I believe you can learn more from looking at photographs and studying them.  For instance I would by looking at the photographs that Tim you don't shoot like a guy.  You don't crop tight like most guys do.  But I will have to say that by you studying paintings, photographs and folding screens it has influenced your style of shooting for elegance.  

By the way where did you shoot those fall images.  Its nearly impossible such elegant places with waterfalls.  JP
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2010, 09:40:49 PM »
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Hey are you on a trip,  I want to go on a trip to see these can you tell us where some of these are taken.  JP
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #26 on: July 05, 2010, 11:11:50 PM »
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Jamie, these were shot in Pennsylvania, utah and california.  Fall images from Penn and New york.  Sorry to everyone I spent a good deal of my time re-building the first green gallery in the world two blocks down.

It really came out great, sorry for the delay response.  I very sore from all the building and moving.   T
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2010, 11:44:25 PM »
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I have friends coming up this week to their cabin.  I will be joining them.  Hope your around, can't wait to see the new gallery.  JP
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WillHastings
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« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2010, 01:27:01 PM »
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This is such an interesting thread. I am trying to get to a point in my photography where I find my own voice. I am always disappointed in myself when I find myself trying to more or less copy another photographer. I love the idea of taking more inspiration from and learning from non photographic works. Tim I was wondering if you could talk more about specifically what sorts of things you have gleaned by studying past masters, and how you incorporate them into your photography.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2010, 11:55:00 PM »
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Well, trying to answer this question is long and tedious.  It spans the learning of everything I have thought about over 25 years.

So where to start.  What I like to look at is the black and white images of how they compose and how what they were looking for in lighting when they created the image.  So I study the great paintings and have the privilege to be a consultant with the Smithsonian Here in my spare time I studied paintings, photography, japanese and chinese folding screen and many other inspirational artworks.  Remember there are old ways of capturing images that can be dome today to create a unique look with our camera systems today.

For instance, stitching images should be thought about in the way of how a Banquet cameras took images.  This I should and have been asked to do in a video.

But I have had the ability to show and exhibit my work with Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter and others.  But I'm not looking to mimic them but to see what they see and improve upon it in a number of ways.  Wether its lighting, use of composition, elegance of style in shooting ect.

And please don't take this as arrogance, I believe we are only as good as the way we see and pre-visualize.  I spend a tremendous amount of time trying to envision what I hope to see and compose and then create and print.  I have a method to my madness and Michael and others have witnessed it when being around me.  I believe this is what allows me to shoot such elegant images and see lighting in a new way.

Color, I believe has been thought about wrong.  My friend John Paul gets it right.   Its not about the color its about the lighting the color just has to be there.  But most people stop when when they see bright colors.  Getting images to have dimension can be emphasized with color tones, lighting difference, focal length and unique lighting like fog, sheening light, illuminated light, reflected light and color ect.  This is very hard to write about, but is very easy to show with my prints or slide shows.  I wish everyone could see my new gallery and then they will see what I'm talking about.

Anyway I'm not a writer, but do have a nice lecture and its easier for everyone to see what I'm talking about.  But in short, its like a puzzle picking every aspect of what you want in your final image and create it with the right Lighting, composition, depth of field, right angle to shoot the image, right focal length and the right relationship of your main subject matter to its surroundings of your highlights to your shadow area with detail.  Hope this helps, maybe if you want you can talk by phone sometime.  Tim



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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2010, 05:28:10 AM »
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I believe we are only as good as the way we see and pre-visualize.
Is it not nice that to have a member who appreciates art, and knows what he is doing?

It reminds me of a comment I made recently:

"I would like to take photography back to days when..."
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Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
DRSeay
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« Reply #31 on: August 12, 2010, 09:52:50 AM »
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Was the image "In Search of the Ancient" taken at Antelope Falls also known as Bumble Bee Creek Falls? Looks really familiar, if so when was this taken? Thanks for the beautiful images
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #32 on: August 12, 2010, 05:24:58 PM »
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Dick, not sure what you mean by this.  I just have a unique way of looking at things and a way that works for me. 
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kenben
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« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2010, 09:24:55 AM »
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During the past year and a half I have been doing a look of my photographing on the Aux Sauble River North of Massey and the Wakonassin River North of Webbwood in Northern Ontario.I spend a great deal of time hiking along the river looking for photographic opportunities and enjoying the wilderness.Waterfalls are my favourite.But I look within the waterfalls for my subject matter.You can check out my blog and my FAA site to view my photos.

http://kenben.wordpress.com/

http://ken-bennison.artistwebsites.com/
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #34 on: August 28, 2010, 12:25:41 AM »
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Taken in Escalante Nat'l Park.  It a great hike and there is a smaller one up river and is hard to find.  Tim
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mitchallenphoto
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« Reply #35 on: August 29, 2010, 11:53:53 AM »
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Very nice shot! I like in the rivers path the best, but they are all really nice.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #36 on: August 30, 2010, 10:23:55 PM »
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I agree this one is very nice as a black and white and color image.  When I saw the scene, I felt that it was an image the Paul Caponigro would like to have shot.  It has the look of something a Japanese Garden would have made to show zen.

THey all act on each other and still is a very good seller.  But only sells to men.  Glad you like this,  I posted them all for certain reasons and represent different ideas of nature but they all have elegance.  Tim
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #37 on: September 22, 2010, 12:31:20 AM »
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I got your amazing book and I think I like the Secret Garden.  What an amazing complex shot.  Jp
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #38 on: September 22, 2010, 02:36:02 PM »
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Was the image "In Search of the Ancient" taken at Antelope Falls also known as Bumble Bee Creek Falls? Looks really familiar, if so when was this taken? Thanks for the beautiful images

It's lower calf creek falls located between the towns of Boulder and Escalante on UT highway 12 (one of the most secnic roads in North America).  It's about a 6 mile hike (round trip) over mostly flat ground with some slickrock and some sand.  Info Here.

Taken in Escalante Nat'l Park.  

Pssst Tim, there is no such place (yet).  Technically it's the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.  Smiley I have about 10 favorties in all of those.  

Its not about the color its about the lighting the color just has to be there.  But most people stop when when they see bright colors.  Getting images to have dimension can be emphasized with color tones, lighting difference, focal length and unique lighting like fog, sheening light, illuminated light, reflected light and color ect. 

VERY well said.  My quote of the day for sure.  Thanks for that.
I hope they inspire you to find your magical spots.  

This is my magical spot.  If you've ever been to Zion and rode the bus up the canyon, you've been within 100 yds of this spot, but I bet you missed it...  Wink


« Last Edit: September 22, 2010, 02:43:45 PM by Lonnie Utah » Logged
tim wolcott
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« Reply #39 on: November 21, 2010, 10:15:19 PM »
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Here are a few more.  Tim
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